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Arlington Road

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | July 11, 1999
When Mark Pellington showed his new movie, "Arlington Road," at the Maryland Film Festival in April, what might have been a giddy homecoming for the Baltimore native turned out to be an evening of more mixed emotions.Just four days earlier, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris had killed themselves, 12 of their classmates and one teacher at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo. And Screen Gems, the division of Sony Pictures that is releasing "Arlington Road," had informed Pellington the night before that they would be changing the film's release date from May until mid-July.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | July 11, 1999
When Mark Pellington showed his new movie, "Arlington Road," at the Maryland Film Festival in April, what might have been a giddy homecoming for the Baltimore native turned out to be an evening of more mixed emotions.Just four days earlier, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris had killed themselves, 12 of their classmates and one teacher at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo. And Screen Gems, the division of Sony Pictures that is releasing "Arlington Road," had informed Pellington the night before that they would be changing the film's release date from May until mid-July.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 9, 1999
Rarely has suburbia looked as blandly malign as it does in "Arlington Road," Mark Pellington's taut, harrowing and thought-provoking new suspense thriller.As early as the movie's first scene, of a young boy staggering down a well-kept street, the movie's atmosphere and emotional tone are made clear, driven home by images of benign domesticity -- a flag, a bird feeder, clothes flapping on a line -- shown in striking photographic negatives. In this disquieting movie, paranoia and suspicion rule the day, and even something as innocent as a Dalmatian gnawing a bone looks frighteningly ominous.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 9, 1999
The past year has been something of a limbo contest for filmmaker Mark Pellington. First his film "Arlington Road," the first feature film he has made to reach wide audiences, was delayed because its parent studio, Polygram, was acquired and subsumed by Universal Pictures.Then the movie's new parent studio, Sony Pictures, chose to push the movie back from its scheduled release date in May to mid-summer. Then the geniuses in the company's marketing department chose to spoil what should be a twisty psychological suspense thriller by giving nearly everything away in a tell-all trailer.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 2, 1999
The Maryland Film Festival has nabbed the regional premiere of "Arlington Road," the new thriller by Baltimore native Mark Pellington.Pellington's new film, which stars Jeff Bridges as a college professor who studies extremist groups and Tim Robbins as a neighbor he suspects of being a terrorist, will be shown April 24. "Father's Daze," Pellington's 1993 documentary about his father, former Baltimore Colt Bill Pellington, and his struggle with Alzheimer's Disease,...
FEATURES
April 23, 1999
When Baltimore magazine published a story about "Homicide: Life on the Street" in 1997, it ran a couple of photographs of rehearsals. The actors Yaphet Kotto and Andre Braugher were identified. The tall, powerfully built and bespectacled director was not.The omission was ironic, since the director, Mark Pellington, would have made a pretty good subject for an article in his own right.The son of Bill Pellington, the Baltimore Colts linebacker who helped his team win the NFL championship in 1958, Mark grew up in Timonium and attended St. Paul's School.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 9, 1999
The past year has been something of a limbo contest for filmmaker Mark Pellington. First his film "Arlington Road," the first feature film he has made to reach wide audiences, was delayed because its parent studio, Polygram, was acquired and subsumed by Universal Pictures.Then the movie's new parent studio, Sony Pictures, chose to push the movie back from its scheduled release date in May to mid-summer. Then the geniuses in the company's marketing department chose to spoil what should be a twisty psychological suspense thriller by giving nearly everything away in a tell-all trailer.
NEWS
October 3, 1990
The Eastern Regional Service Center of the state Department of Natural Resources will be moving to the Salisbury District Court/Multi-Service Center Oct. 11 and 12.The center's current facilities, at 122 Arlington Road, Salisbury, will be closed those days. The center's new location will open Oct. 12.The new address is: Department of Natural Resources, Eastern Regional Service Center, 201 Baptist St., Room 3340, Salisbury 21801-4969.The new telephone number is 301-543-6740.
NEWS
July 1, 2005
On Wednesday, June 29, 2005, RUTH ALLEN SISKIND, age 86, of Bethesda, MD beloved wife of the late William Siskind; devoted mother of Marian (Charles) Osher, Robert (Barbara) Siskind and Sherry (the late David) Trahan; beloved sister of the late Zelda Goodman and the late Josephine Cohen; cherished grandmother of Joshua and Erica Osher, Leah (Jarlath) Treacy, Robin Siskind, Samuel and Benjamin Trahan. Funeral services will be held on Sunday, July 3, 2005 at 10 a.m. at Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home, 11800 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD. Interment to follow at Judean Memorial Park in Olney, MD. Family will be observing Shiva at the residence of Marian and Charles Osher on Sunday and Monday.
NEWS
July 16, 2005
On July 13, 2005, BETH SUZANNETARQUINI (nee Young), of Finksburg, MD. Beloved wife of Frank Edward Tarquini. Devoted daughter of James Douglas and Patricia Louise Stevens Young. Loving sister of Amy Daniele Young-Buckler and Karen Michele James. Also survived by her grandfather Raymond Wilson and aunt of Joseph, Alyssa, and Anthony Gonnella. A Prayer Service will be held at the family owned Mc Comas Funeral Home, Abingdon, MD on Sunday, July 17 at8 P.M. Friends may call at the funeral home in Abingdon on Sunday from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M. A Memorial Service will be held at a later date.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 9, 1999
Rarely has suburbia looked as blandly malign as it does in "Arlington Road," Mark Pellington's taut, harrowing and thought-provoking new suspense thriller.As early as the movie's first scene, of a young boy staggering down a well-kept street, the movie's atmosphere and emotional tone are made clear, driven home by images of benign domesticity -- a flag, a bird feeder, clothes flapping on a line -- shown in striking photographic negatives. In this disquieting movie, paranoia and suspicion rule the day, and even something as innocent as a Dalmatian gnawing a bone looks frighteningly ominous.
FEATURES
April 23, 1999
When Baltimore magazine published a story about "Homicide: Life on the Street" in 1997, it ran a couple of photographs of rehearsals. The actors Yaphet Kotto and Andre Braugher were identified. The tall, powerfully built and bespectacled director was not.The omission was ironic, since the director, Mark Pellington, would have made a pretty good subject for an article in his own right.The son of Bill Pellington, the Baltimore Colts linebacker who helped his team win the NFL championship in 1958, Mark grew up in Timonium and attended St. Paul's School.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 2, 1999
The Maryland Film Festival has nabbed the regional premiere of "Arlington Road," the new thriller by Baltimore native Mark Pellington.Pellington's new film, which stars Jeff Bridges as a college professor who studies extremist groups and Tim Robbins as a neighbor he suspects of being a terrorist, will be shown April 24. "Father's Daze," Pellington's 1993 documentary about his father, former Baltimore Colt Bill Pellington, and his struggle with Alzheimer's Disease,...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2000
The best movie thrillers, no matter how outrageous the plot twists or how fickle the characters, exhibit their own sense of logic. The stories may turn on a dime, the narrative may leave the viewer with a severe case of whiplash, but the audience keeps believing. Then there are the thrillers where the writers insert a plot twist just because it's time for a plot twist, shift a character's mood simply because they can and carefully calculate the number of turns-on-a-dime. The audience never starts believing.
NEWS
May 13, 2004
KAREN B. (Jones) KING, 35, died at approximately 11:30 P.M. on May 9 in Felton. Karen was born on October 1, 1968 in Baltimore, MD. She is the daughter of Vickey L. (Schuman) Meyers and husband Paul of Brogue and father Harold E. Jones, Sr. of Baltimore, MD. She was a 1986 graduate of Kenwood High School in Baltimore, MD. Karen was a Quality Assurance Manager for First Quality Janitorial Service in York. She attended North Hills Bible Church in York and was a member of the Liberty Club in York.
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