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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 23, 1993
ARLES, France -- Hubert Yonnet breeds bulls and horses on the Camargue's wild marshlands, where the Rhone meets the Mediterranean. Cowboys ride his ranch, birds squawk overhead, and change comes with the cadence of the seasons. But the steady life on the Yonnet ranch is now affected by a turnabout of tastes in this earthy part of southern France.The tradition of bullfighting, which had diminished to a trickle, is coming back with vigor. It has already increased the demand for Yonnet bulls and for several seasons filled this region's arenas with roaring spectators.
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
Alexander Morris gently plated seasoned chicken pieces atop creamy risotto and garnish, while Tyler Weedon whisked a fish reduction, a brownish sauce. Nearby, Kara Lovalvo used a meat thermometer to measure the heat of a lobster tail, and Eric Orlean assembled the dessert - a banana chocolate Bavarian. Though preparing the gourmet items posed a challenge for the culinary-minded teenagers from Howard County, the kitchen conditions made Wednesday's statewide cooking contest for high-schoolers even more daunting: Teams had to make the meal in one hour using only two butane burners for heat.
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NEWS
May 6, 1992
ARLES, France -- The world's oldest citizen, the doyenne of humanity, can remember meeting the impressionist painter Vincent Van Gogh when she was a teen-ager more than 100 years ago.Jeanne Calment is now 117.She has been widowed for longer than most people are married -- more than 30 years -- but still enjoys the good things in life like chocolate and the odd glass of port. She even allows herself an occasional cigarette after lunch.A source of pride in her hometown of Arles in the south of France, she is modest, even a little skeptical, about her title of doyenne, as figured by the Guinness Book of Records.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | February 18, 2007
With an appetizer of crab-stuffed ravioli and rockfish, an entree of pork tenderloin, and cream-filled empanadas for dessert, the cooking team from Howard County's Applications and Research Lab won the Maryland ProStart Student Invitational for the third year in a row. "We felt that it went well," said Ryan Meliker, 16, the team leader. Even before the winner was announced, he said, "We knew we were going to do pretty well, maybe not win. But I think we knew we did pretty well." Students on the winning team were Kevin Gonsales and Crystal Rivera of Long Reach High School; Meliker of Centennial High School; Pete Gallagher of Wilde Lake High School; and Jason Cohen of River Hill High School.
NEWS
By Colleen M. Webster | January 27, 1995
She was speakingas the car swerved by lit developmentswhere families ate through Jeopardyand yawned through Beverly Hills 90210.''You know, about Gauguin, his colorswere never the same after Martiniqueand Panama with Charles Laval.Still, he had his son, Emile,with him in Paris, the other fourwith his wife in her home, Holland.It was mainly the brush strokesthat Gauguin changed, VanGogh andhe not agreeing right up tothe night Vincent cut off his ear.Yes, Gauguin was there, the twoof them fighting across theArles countryside and absinthesinstead of dinner when theycould afford only one or the other.
NEWS
By Susan Goldman Rubin | November 28, 2001
* Editor's note: Two legendary artists live and work side by side. One day in the spring of 1888, Vincent van Gogh put on his straw hat, gathered his art supplies and went out to paint. Peach trees, irises and buttercups bloomed in the orchards and meadows. But Vincent's favorite was the sunflowers. At the end of the day, when Vincent finished painting, he returned to his Yellow House. Because he had just recently moved to Arles, a town in the south of France, he had only a few friends.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 10, 2004
In the musical The Highest Yellow, the title is Vincent van Gogh's description of a color so intense that it is "where I know no fear,/where I disappear." Yet in this stunning musical - receiving its world premiere at Signature Theatre in Arlington, Va. - a young doctor is the character in greatest danger of losing himself, of disappearing. With an intricate score by Broadway composer Michael John LaChiusa and an incisive libretto by Washington playwright John Strand, the musical focuses primarily on Dr. Felix Rey, the intern assigned to treat van Gogh in the hospital in Arles, France, where the artist is admitted after cutting off his ear. The result is a show whose central theme is not the painter's artistic process; that theme was mastered in another musical about a post-Impressionist painter - Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's Pulitzer Prize-winning Sunday in the Park with George.
FEATURES
By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 10, 1997
AIX-EN-PROVENCE, France -- Painters know the region well because it has served so beautifully as subject matter: the French-blue Mediterranean, gnarled black-and-silver olive trees, chalky mountains, flirtatious villages, timeless brasseries and, of course, the ruins of an ancient Roman domain.Last fall, that fabulous setting attracted a swarm of amateur artists from Santa Barbara, Calif., who gathered noisily one rainy October morning in the medieval darkness of the breakfast room at Hotel Les Augustins.
NEWS
March 26, 2006
On March 23, 2006, ARLING J. (nee Steinert); beloved wife of the late Clarence L. Burger, Sr.; devoted mother of Clarence L. Burger, Jr. and his wife Angelina, Gerard R. Burger and his wife Patricia and the later Charles J. Burger; loving grandmother of Lynette Burns, Christopher M., Steven E. and Charles J. Burger; loving great-grandmother of Madeline and Emilia Burns; dear sister of Eugenia M. Wahl. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at the family owned Duda Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, Inc., 7922 Wise Avenue on Sunday at 8 P.M. Interment private.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 11, 2004
New principals have been named for eight Howard County schools and the Applied Research Laboratory, which houses technology education. Assignments and reassignments for the fall semester were announced yesterday during a school board meeting: Applied Research Laboratory: Mary Day (current principal of Howard High) Centennial High: Scott Pfeifer (current principal of River Hill High) Clemens Crossing Elementary: Peggy Dumler (current assistant principal at Talbott Springs Elementary) Glenelg High: Karl Schindler (current assistant principal at Howard High)
NEWS
March 26, 2006
On March 23, 2006, ARLING J. (nee Steinert); beloved wife of the late Clarence L. Burger, Sr.; devoted mother of Clarence L. Burger, Jr. and his wife Angelina, Gerard R. Burger and his wife Patricia and the later Charles J. Burger; loving grandmother of Lynette Burns, Christopher M., Steven E. and Charles J. Burger; loving great-grandmother of Madeline and Emilia Burns; dear sister of Eugenia M. Wahl. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at the family owned Duda Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, Inc., 7922 Wise Avenue on Sunday at 8 P.M. Interment private.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 10, 2004
In the musical The Highest Yellow, the title is Vincent van Gogh's description of a color so intense that it is "where I know no fear,/where I disappear." Yet in this stunning musical - receiving its world premiere at Signature Theatre in Arlington, Va. - a young doctor is the character in greatest danger of losing himself, of disappearing. With an intricate score by Broadway composer Michael John LaChiusa and an incisive libretto by Washington playwright John Strand, the musical focuses primarily on Dr. Felix Rey, the intern assigned to treat van Gogh in the hospital in Arles, France, where the artist is admitted after cutting off his ear. The result is a show whose central theme is not the painter's artistic process; that theme was mastered in another musical about a post-Impressionist painter - Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's Pulitzer Prize-winning Sunday in the Park with George.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 11, 2004
New principals have been named for eight Howard County schools and the Applied Research Laboratory, which houses technology education. Assignments and reassignments for the fall semester were announced yesterday during a school board meeting: Applied Research Laboratory: Mary Day (current principal of Howard High) Centennial High: Scott Pfeifer (current principal of River Hill High) Clemens Crossing Elementary: Peggy Dumler (current assistant principal at Talbott Springs Elementary) Glenelg High: Karl Schindler (current assistant principal at Howard High)
NEWS
By Susan Goldman Rubin | November 28, 2001
* Editor's note: Two legendary artists live and work side by side. One day in the spring of 1888, Vincent van Gogh put on his straw hat, gathered his art supplies and went out to paint. Peach trees, irises and buttercups bloomed in the orchards and meadows. But Vincent's favorite was the sunflowers. At the end of the day, when Vincent finished painting, he returned to his Yellow House. Because he had just recently moved to Arles, a town in the south of France, he had only a few friends.
FEATURES
By Robert Cross and Robert Cross,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 10, 1997
AIX-EN-PROVENCE, France -- Painters know the region well because it has served so beautifully as subject matter: the French-blue Mediterranean, gnarled black-and-silver olive trees, chalky mountains, flirtatious villages, timeless brasseries and, of course, the ruins of an ancient Roman domain.Last fall, that fabulous setting attracted a swarm of amateur artists from Santa Barbara, Calif., who gathered noisily one rainy October morning in the medieval darkness of the breakfast room at Hotel Les Augustins.
NEWS
By Colleen M. Webster | January 27, 1995
She was speakingas the car swerved by lit developmentswhere families ate through Jeopardyand yawned through Beverly Hills 90210.''You know, about Gauguin, his colorswere never the same after Martiniqueand Panama with Charles Laval.Still, he had his son, Emile,with him in Paris, the other fourwith his wife in her home, Holland.It was mainly the brush strokesthat Gauguin changed, VanGogh andhe not agreeing right up tothe night Vincent cut off his ear.Yes, Gauguin was there, the twoof them fighting across theArles countryside and absinthesinstead of dinner when theycould afford only one or the other.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
Alexander Morris gently plated seasoned chicken pieces atop creamy risotto and garnish, while Tyler Weedon whisked a fish reduction, a brownish sauce. Nearby, Kara Lovalvo used a meat thermometer to measure the heat of a lobster tail, and Eric Orlean assembled the dessert - a banana chocolate Bavarian. Though preparing the gourmet items posed a challenge for the culinary-minded teenagers from Howard County, the kitchen conditions made Wednesday's statewide cooking contest for high-schoolers even more daunting: Teams had to make the meal in one hour using only two butane burners for heat.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | February 18, 2007
With an appetizer of crab-stuffed ravioli and rockfish, an entree of pork tenderloin, and cream-filled empanadas for dessert, the cooking team from Howard County's Applications and Research Lab won the Maryland ProStart Student Invitational for the third year in a row. "We felt that it went well," said Ryan Meliker, 16, the team leader. Even before the winner was announced, he said, "We knew we were going to do pretty well, maybe not win. But I think we knew we did pretty well." Students on the winning team were Kevin Gonsales and Crystal Rivera of Long Reach High School; Meliker of Centennial High School; Pete Gallagher of Wilde Lake High School; and Jason Cohen of River Hill High School.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 23, 1993
ARLES, France -- Hubert Yonnet breeds bulls and horses on the Camargue's wild marshlands, where the Rhone meets the Mediterranean. Cowboys ride his ranch, birds squawk overhead, and change comes with the cadence of the seasons. But the steady life on the Yonnet ranch is now affected by a turnabout of tastes in this earthy part of southern France.The tradition of bullfighting, which had diminished to a trickle, is coming back with vigor. It has already increased the demand for Yonnet bulls and for several seasons filled this region's arenas with roaring spectators.
NEWS
May 6, 1992
ARLES, France -- The world's oldest citizen, the doyenne of humanity, can remember meeting the impressionist painter Vincent Van Gogh when she was a teen-ager more than 100 years ago.Jeanne Calment is now 117.She has been widowed for longer than most people are married -- more than 30 years -- but still enjoys the good things in life like chocolate and the odd glass of port. She even allows herself an occasional cigarette after lunch.A source of pride in her hometown of Arles in the south of France, she is modest, even a little skeptical, about her title of doyenne, as figured by the Guinness Book of Records.
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