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NEWS
July 24, 1999
Sen. Arlen Specter, a Pennsylvania Republican, is the latest lawmaker to try to prevent sports teams from jilting cities and demanding tax dollars for stadiums.A bill he introduced would shield the National Football League from antitrust lawsuits when it blocks a team move -- protection Major League Baseball already has. While the NFL has sought this in the past, the rest of the bill is something it and baseball oppose: requirements that the leagues pay for their stadiums.It would require the two leagues to put into a trust fund 10 percent of their network TV revenues each year.
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NEWS
By Arlen Specter | July 23, 2011
Washington traditionally boasts about its' profiles in courage. Today, facing arguably the greatest potential financial crisis in American history, politics trumps economics as officials focus on the next election instead of the public interest. The leader of the parade in profiles in cowardice is Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell with his ingenious, diabolical proposal, which avoids tough votes for Republicans and places all the blame on Democrats. It's all inside the beltway maneuvering and hard to explain, but it is indispensible for the American people to understand it so public opinion can be mobilized to stop it. Senator McConnell wants an act of Congress to give the president the authority to raise the debt ceiling on his own and then to decide where federal expenditures would be cut. Congress could overrule the president with a resolution of disapproval calculated to fail because it would be vetoed and an override by two-thirds of both houses would be a practical impossibility.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 30, 1992
Bill put the character issue behind him. Unfortunately, close behind.If you can't get Clarence Thomas, at least get Arlen Specter.Cheer up. The economy grew at an annual rate of 2 percent in the first quarter. George is in.After all this politics, it's nice to see a real circus come to town.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | May 20, 2010
Let me begin with a confession: I voted for Arlen Specter in one of his five successful elections to the U.S. Senate as a Republican from Pennsylvania. In my defense, the vote was accidental; I didn't mean to do it, but for a reason or reasons that remain unknown to me, my finger flipped up the tab next to his name and I then pulled the lever, finalizing this mistake. Luckily, he won by more than a single vote. Senator Specter, turncoat extraordinaire, onetime Democrat turned Republican turned Democrat and finally turned out of office Tuesday at the tender age of 80, is, to me, the very epitome of the self-serving career politician who will do anything to keep his spotted hands on the levers of power.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,The Almanac of American Politics, 1996; U.S. Census Bureau; Pennsylvania State Board of Elections/ROBERT CRONAN : SUN STAFF Pub Date: 5/20/96 SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 20, 1996
HARRISBURG, Pa. -- If you want to chart the presidential campaign of 1996, this is as good a place to start as any.2 (Those of Hispanic descent may be of any race)Political lineupGovernor: Tom Ridge (R), elected 1994U.S. Senators: Arlen Specter (R), elected 1980Rick Santorum (R), elected 1994House of Representatives: 21 total (11 D, 10 R)Registered Voters6,389,163 -- (March 1996)Democrat -- 49.3%Republican -- 43.3%Other -- 7.4%How State Voted in Recent Presidential Elections:1992: Clinton (D)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 28, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Trying to improve national readiness for a potential outbreak of the avian flu, the Senate approved nearly $8 billion yesterday to stockpile vaccines and other drugs to combat the disease and to bolster local health agencies and hospitals. "Alarm bells must be rung," said Sen. Tom Harkin, an Iowa Democrat. "The warning signs are there, and we have to start preparing. The time for planning and thinking about it is past." The money was approved as part of a $145 billion spending measure that covers health, education and labor programs.
NEWS
February 3, 1995
FROM CNN's William Schneider, commenting on a report that Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan briefed talk show host Rush Limbaugh on the Mexican aid package proposed to Congress by President Clinton and withdrawn in favor of action that did not need congressional approval:"Limbaugh has more influence in the new Congress than the chairman of the Federal Reserve does. That's how much politics has changed."* * *BEST quip from the Washington Press Club Foundation's annual Salute to Congress dinner went to Republican Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison of Texas.
NEWS
April 22, 2004
PRESIDENT BUSH has spent hours in public, on radio and on television this week arguing in defense of the USA Patriot Act as if the uber-security legislation was in some kind of imminent danger. Except that, uh, it's not. Raising a ruckus over this non-issue is seriously misleading. Sections of the law aren't due to expire until next year, and other sections aren't due to expire ever. Congress isn't even considering it right now. Crying "The sky is falling!" over the Patriot Act won't distract from the more sky-damaging testimony of the 9/11 commission or the parade of errors in Iraq.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | March 30, 1995
Campaigning in Baltimore, Republican presidential candidate Lamar Alexander said yesterday that a controversial $236,000 payment to him from Lockheed Martin Corp. is no big deal.The money -- part of an $82 million payout to outgoing officials of Martin Marietta, which has merged with Lockheed Corp. -- represents "my pay for being on the board," Mr. Alexander said."It is the amount of money that I would have been entitled to whether I stayed or whether I went," he said.Mr. Alexander is leaving Martin Marietta's board this month because of the merger.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | October 31, 1991
Washington -- HE WAS leaving a forum in Pittsburgh Monday when a woman rushed up to Sen. Arlen Specter and said, "Arlen, I'm still with you, but you were too tough on Anita Hill."One more American woman firing a shot in the gender war that has no signs of a truce.The faces of Anita Hill and Clarence Thomas faded off TV screens two weeks ago. I can't recall a Washington event that left such rumbling aftershocks. It was the political version of the 1989 San Francisco earthquake.For many women -- and politicians ensnared in the Hill-Thomas teledrama -- the seismic blasts opened an emotional crevasse.
NEWS
By James Oliphant and James Oliphant,Tribune Washington Bureau | February 9, 2009
Washington -With the Obama administration facing a make-or-break week for enacting a major economic stimulus package, officials increased pressure on lawmakers yesterday to waste no time sending the bill to the president for his signature. President Barack Obama planned to hit the road this week to sell the package directly to the public. He'll spend today in Indiana and tomorrow in Florida, and he will hold his first prime-time news conference tonight. The White House wants the president's stimulus message transmitted without distraction - so much so that it delayed the planned rollout of the Treasury Department's revised formula for rescuing the financial sector from today until tomorrow.
NEWS
By Maura Reynolds and Maura Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Supporters of a comprehensive immigration reform bill have successfully repelled a series of attacks on the Senate floor, ensuring that the bill would survive its first week and significantly raising the prospects that the Senate will pass the controversial measure. The fragile bipartisan coalition behind the bill thwarted a bid yesterday to end the temporary worker program after five years, a one-vote victory they saw as a signal that they will be able to parry efforts to undermine the bill.
NEWS
By FAYE FIORE and FAYE FIORE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee called yesterday for criminal prosecution of The New York Times, saying that its report Friday on U.S. government surveillance of confidential banking records "compromised America's anti-terrorist policies." Interviewed on Fox News Sunday, Rep. Peter T. King, a New York Republican, accused the newspaper of compromising national security when it exposed a Treasury Department program that attempts to track terrorist financing by secretly monitoring worldwide money transfers.
NEWS
January 29, 2006
Invoking Sept. 11 an offensive gambit One of the most offensive arguments offered to justify the president's unconstitutional warrantless wiretapping is that had such a system been in place before Sept. 11, 2001, the attacks could have been prevented ("Defense of NSA invokes Sept. 11," Jan. 24). In fact, the government had plenty of legally obtained information before the attacks that might have helped prevent them. But from FBI field reports of strange pilot training requests to presidential briefings about Osama bin Laden planning to strike in the United States, it was ignored.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 28, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Trying to improve national readiness for a potential outbreak of the avian flu, the Senate approved nearly $8 billion yesterday to stockpile vaccines and other drugs to combat the disease and to bolster local health agencies and hospitals. "Alarm bells must be rung," said Sen. Tom Harkin, an Iowa Democrat. "The warning signs are there, and we have to start preparing. The time for planning and thinking about it is past." The money was approved as part of a $145 billion spending measure that covers health, education and labor programs.
NEWS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist might be next. Or will he? Seemingly frail from his struggle with thyroid cancer, the chief justice defied expectations in the past week by not announcing his retirement. Instead, Justice Sandra Day O'Connor turned out to be the retiree who caused an explosion of Washington buzz. But Rehnquist is still considered a good candidate for retirement because of his poor health, possibly giving President Bush the rare opportunity of naming two Supreme Court justices at about the same time.
NEWS
May 29, 2005
THERE IS A POWERFUL dynamic under way in the Republican-led Congress that is blowing holes in its normally rigid party discipline. Fifty House Republicans defied President Bush last week and joined the vast majority of Democrats in voting to lift Mr. Bush's restrictions on federal spending for embryonic stem cell research. In the Senate, Republican sponsors of a companion measure say they have enough votes not only to block a filibuster but to override a presidential veto. Call this a triumph of experience over doctrine, prompted by a shift in debate from theoretical concepts affecting others to issues with which lawmakers are intimately familiar.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- We're sorry. All circuits are busy now. Will you please try your call again later?If you had automatic redial yesterday, you were lucky. If you got through to a senator, you were blessed.Hundreds of thousands of calls flooded Washington yesterday as citizens dialed their senators and the White House to express opinions on the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, leaving in their wake thousands more who got busy signals or recordings saying that all circuits were busy.
NEWS
May 29, 2005
THERE IS A POWERFUL dynamic under way in the Republican-led Congress that is blowing holes in its normally rigid party discipline. Fifty House Republicans defied President Bush last week and joined the vast majority of Democrats in voting to lift Mr. Bush's restrictions on federal spending for embryonic stem cell research. In the Senate, Republican sponsors of a companion measure say they have enough votes not only to block a filibuster but to override a presidential veto. Call this a triumph of experience over doctrine, prompted by a shift in debate from theoretical concepts affecting others to issues with which lawmakers are intimately familiar.
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