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By DAN BERGER | September 8, 1995
Cal who?So the bomber McVeigh and neo-Nazi gun freak paranoids were right about Ruby Ridge. What does that prove?The issue is whether the voters credit the Schmoke Administration with The Streak.Mrs. Clinton went to Mongolia, where the Chinese believe she belongs.Now let's see. The Arkansas governor is off the hook because an Arkansas judge said the wrong prosecutor went after him.
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NEWS
March 15, 2011
For a governor, the politics of parole are terrible. Just ask Mike Huckabee. The former Arkansas governor faced tough questions in his run for president three years ago about his role in the release of Wayne DuMond, a convicted rapist who went on to rape and murder at least one other person, and if he ever gets closer to the presidency, you can bet Mr. Huckabee will face attack ads that make the infamous Willie Horton spot look soft. It is at least in part the legacy of that advertisement attacking former Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis that has made ambitious governors — particularly Democrats — wary of anything that makes them look soft on crime.
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NEWS
November 4, 1992
More than eight months ago, we quoted Gov. Bill Clinton as saying of his second-place finish in the year's first presidential primary, "New Hampshire tonight has made Bill Clinton the comeback kid." He was referring to the fact that after explosive revelations about his womanizing and his draft avoidance had knocked him out of first place in the public opinion polls, he gained back about half his loss to finish behind Paul Tsongas.We took the conventional view that former Senator Tsongas was the real comeback kid. He doubled his support to win the New Hampshire primary.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 22, 2010
Who among us can contain their excitement? The GOP presidential primary season has begun! By my count, there are 24 people who are beneficiaries of nontrivial presidential buzz: Sarah Palin, Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich, John Thune, Tim Pawlenty, Mitch Daniels, Mike Pence, Rick Santorum, Haley Barbour, Mike Huckabee, Bobby Jindal, Paul Ryan, David Petraeus, Ron Paul, Jeb Bush, John Bolton, Bob McDonnell, Jim DeMint, Chris Christie, Herman Cain,...
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Urging President-elect Bill Clinton to honor promises made to black and urban voters, the Rev. Jesse Jackson says he expects the new administration to create jobs for the unemployed and to seek statehood for the District of Columbia."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 26, 1997
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Decades after their bid to enter an all-white school sparked one of the most volatile state-federal conflicts since the Civil War, nine black men and women scaled the steps of Little Rock Central High once again.But unlike the day in 1957 when the "Little Rock Nine" were greeted by a violent, spitting mob outside the school, yesterday the mayor, governor and president of the United States showed up to welcome them as heroes."Forty years ago, they climbed these steps, passed through this door, and moved our nation," President Clinton told cheering onlookers, most born long after an Arkansas governor had deployed the National Guard in a futile effort to block integration of the imposing, five-story school.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | April 30, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Bill Clinton courted congressional Democrats yesterday and wound up on a political blind date, one that was a little awkward but still worth the effort.The Arkansas governor, who has criticized Washington and the perks and privileges of Congress in his campaign, wooed and won the support of an additional 31 lawmakers, including Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, for a total of 123 of the 275 congressional "superdelegates" who will attend the July convention.But the Democratic outsider came "inside" to Capitol Hill not really knowing what to expect wile insisting he was still the "agent for change."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Staff Writer | April 1, 1992
NEW YORK -- Gov. Bill Clinton and former Gov. Jerry Brown labored through an hourlong debate on the problems of urban America last night with scarcely a spark of friction.Mr. Clinton had welcomed the confrontation as an opportunity to attack Mr. Brown's plan for a 13 percent flat tax on businesses and individuals.The Arkansas governor waited until the debate was 45 minutes old before calling the plan "the biggest rip-off in American politics."Then, with only five minutes left, Mr. Clinton reiterated his complaint that the flat tax would favor the rich and destroy the Social Security system.
NEWS
By JULES WITCOVER | October 20, 1992
EAST LANSING, Mich. -- With his back to the wall, President Bush gave it his best shot in the third and final presidential debate last night, and it proved to be the same argument, more aggressively presented, that he has been making all fall -- that Bill Clinton can't be trusted with the presidency.The president, after relatively benign performances in the first two debates, came out much more focused -- on what he repeatedly called a "pattern" of Mr. Clinton's flip-flopping on positions and on the Arkansas governor's 12-year record of stewardship in his economically poor state.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | February 23, 1992
Bill Clinton launched his bid yesterday for the support of Maryland Democrats in the March 3 presidential primary, with bTC Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke hailing his vision and leadership from the pulpit of a major black church.Calling for a "new covenant" between a demoralized people and their government, the Arkansas governor promised "not just a deal, but a solemn agreement to create new opportunity" in the United States.The nation has been divided deliberately along racial and class lines by Republican politicians for the last 12 years, he charged -- but he quickly added: "I don't care whose fault it is anymore.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and By Tom Dunkel,Sun Staff | September 2, 2005
Running for governor of Arkansas was a snap compared with running around the governor's mansion. At first, Mike Huckabee couldn't finish the third-of-a-mile loop. He maxed out at about 50 yards. "I understand why people aren't healthy," says the 50-year-old Republican, now midway through a second four-year term and rumored to be eyeing the White House in 2008. "I am sort of the role model of worst behavior." Too many years of too much eating and too little exercise. Next thing you know, the bathroom scale reads 280 pounds.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 26, 1997
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Decades after their bid to enter an all-white school sparked one of the most volatile state-federal conflicts since the Civil War, nine black men and women scaled the steps of Little Rock Central High once again.But unlike the day in 1957 when the "Little Rock Nine" were greeted by a violent, spitting mob outside the school, yesterday the mayor, governor and president of the United States showed up to welcome them as heroes."Forty years ago, they climbed these steps, passed through this door, and moved our nation," President Clinton told cheering onlookers, most born long after an Arkansas governor had deployed the National Guard in a futile effort to block integration of the imposing, five-story school.
NEWS
By Susan Baer | May 30, 1996
The guilty verdicts this week in the first Whitewater trial are of great interest to the special prosecutor, to President Clinton and to the president's Republican foes.For the prosecutor, the verdicts could accelerate other parts of his investigation. For Republicans, they are ammunition in an election year. For the White House, there is only the modest comfort that the president himself had little to do with the case just concluded.Susan Baer of The Sun's national staff takes a look at what the trial means to the Whitewater saga -- and what it doesn't.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 29, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In a major victory for the Whitewater special prosecutor, Arkansas Gov. Jim Guy Tucker and two of President Clinton's business partners were found guilty yesterday of fraud charges that grew out of the Arkansas land deal that has dogged the president.The verdict, by a federal court jury that deliberated for eight days in Little Rock, was loaded with convictions -- 24 guilty counts out of a possible 30 -- and represents a serious blow to Clinton's efforts to put the Whitewater saga behind him.It gives new momentum to Kenneth W. Starr, the independent counsel who has been investigating Whitewater for nearly two years and is likely to seek more indictments, as well as to congressional committees investigating the deal.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 8, 1995
Cal who?So the bomber McVeigh and neo-Nazi gun freak paranoids were right about Ruby Ridge. What does that prove?The issue is whether the voters credit the Schmoke Administration with The Streak.Mrs. Clinton went to Mongolia, where the Chinese believe she belongs.Now let's see. The Arkansas governor is off the hook because an Arkansas judge said the wrong prosecutor went after him.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service J JTC | August 18, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A federal grand jury has indicted the Clintons' business partners in the Whitewater land venture and the governor of Arkansas on 21 counts of fraud, conspiracy and making false statements in obtaining millions of dollars of federally backed loans in the 1980s.The indictment, handed up yesterday by a federal grand jury in Little Rock, Ark., charged that the two partners, James B. McDougal and his former wife, Susan H. McDougal, concocted a series of fraudulent loans from Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan, an Arkansas savings association at the center of the Whitewater investigation.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Staff Writer | March 25, 1992
Angry Connecticut voters slammed the brakes on Bill Clinton's nomination express yesterday, handing Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr. an upset victory in his first head-to-head duel with the Arkansas governor.The startling results were a clear setback to Mr. Clinton, the Democratic front-runner. They indicate the party's voters aren't ready to endorse the notion that he has the nomination sewed up. They also put heavy pressure on Mr. Clinton to recoup two weeks from now in the New York primary.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 30, 1992
TOLEDO, Ohio -- Down to the very end, Democratic nominee Bill Clinton is adhering to the basic strategy that has marked his long campaign: Never let an attack go unanswered and, if possible, turn the attack onto the attacker.This approach, which saw Clinton through some of the toughest periods of his campaign this year, is marking his windup on the stump as President Bush attempts to drive home the issue of trust against him as the best hope to salvage his own re-election.The core of the president's attack is that the Arkansas governor has neither the experience nor the trustworthiness to be counted on to make life-and-death decisions in the Oval Office.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Lyle Denniston contributed to this article | June 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Arkansas Gov. Jim Guy Tucker, whose business dealings have come under scrutiny as part as the investigation into President Clinton's financial affairs, was indicted yesterday by the Whitewater grand jury on charges of lying to obtain a $300,000 government-backed loan.The Tucker indictment does not relate to Mr. Clinton directly.But some of the figures involved in the case against Mr. Tucker have been linked to Mr. Clinton's financial affairs before he became president.Mr. Tucker, a Democrat who succeeded Mr. Clinton as governor, was charged, along with an associate, with making false claims to a lending company backed by the federal Small Business Administration.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President-elect Bill Clinton, alumnus of Georgetown and Oxford, is no hick. But every once in a while he lets fly with an expression that comes straight from his small-town Arkansas roots.Appearing on Arsenio Hall's late night talk show in June, the ultra-hip host asked the Arkansas governor to list his shortcomings. Mr. Clinton said they'd have to hold a "bunking party" to allow him time to detail them all.That's what they call a slumber party or sleepover down in Arkansas.
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