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Arizona Lottery

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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1996
The company that will be taking over Maryland's $1 billion-a-year lottery business is having big troubles in Arizona, where persistent glitches have marred its first few months of running that state's lottery.The problems have worried the treasurer of Kentucky, where a lottery contract with the company is pending, and prompted speculation about what is in store for Maryland.The contractor, Automated Wagering International Inc., is facing hefty fines over computer problems that have kept the Arizona lottery from collecting more than $14 million in instant ticket receipts from stores.
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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
The company that took over Maryland's $1 billion-a-year lottery business last month is up for sale, raising questions about its future here.Automated Wagering International Inc. yesterday cited uncertainties surrounding its possible sale as a reason for withdrawing its offer to run the Kentucky lottery.AWI's parent company, Video Lottery Technologies, disclosed that it was "entertaining offers for the purchase of AWI" in a letter to Kentucky Lottery President Arthur L. Gleason Jr.The announcement raises questions about how the potential sale could affect the company's $53 million contract to run the Maryland lottery for five years.
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NEWS
June 6, 1996
STATE LAWMAKERS are rightly concerned about the State Lottery Agency's transition to a new computer system next month, when AWI Inc. succeeds GTECH Corp. as the contractor running the lottery games. AWI, after all, just lost its Arizona lottery contract over allegations of poor performance. Will that happen here?The legislature's fiscal analysts indicated there might be problems. But the evidence turned out to be superficial at a hearing this week. It badly misled state lawmakers, who thought (incorrectly)
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1996
Maryland lottery players and sellers yesterday reported a lessening of the computer problems that beset them Monday, but some of the pink computers continued to work erratically or not at all.About 200 of the almost 3,800 new lottery terminals statewide remained out of service on Automated Wagering International's second day on the job. AWI, a lottery contractor with a troubled past, began running the state's $1 billion-a-year lottery business Monday.Maryland...
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
Worried state legislators told Maryland lottery officials yesterday to develop a backup plan in case their new contractor fails to perform when it takes over lottery operations next month.Legislators said they were alarmed that the contractor, Automated Wagering International, was fired by the Arizona lottery last month for poor performance. AWI is installing a computer system in Maryland that is similar, although larger and more complex, than the one rejected by Arizona."We think you should come up with a contingency plan," said Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell, a Baltimore County Democrat.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1996
The company that took over Maryland's $1 billion-a-year lottery business last month is up for sale, raising questions about its future here.Automated Wagering International Inc. yesterday cited uncertainties surrounding its possible sale as a reason for withdrawing its offer to run the Kentucky lottery.AWI's parent company, Video Lottery Technologies, disclosed that it was "entertaining offers for the purchase of AWI" in a letter to Kentucky Lottery President Arthur L. Gleason Jr.The announcement raises questions about how the potential sale could affect the company's $53 million contract to run the Maryland lottery for five years.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
The beleaguered company that was scheduled to take over Maryland's lottery games next month told state officials yesterday it needs an extra 28 days to get ready.The request for a delay came after the company, Automated Wagering International Inc. -- which recently was fired by Arizona's lottery for poor performance -- delivered flawed software to Maryland this month, a state lottery official said.At a hastily called meeting in Annapolis, top state legislators greeted news of the request nervously and, in some cases, angrily.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
PHOENIX -- Citing poor performance, the Arizona Lottery dumped the company yesterday that will be taking over Maryland's $1 billion-a-year lottery business.In a drastic step, the lottery commission voted unanimously to terminate its 6-month-old contract with Automated Wagering International after frustrated members learned that it would take another six months for the computer system to be working properly.The computer system Arizona rejected is very similar to the one AWI plans to install for the Maryland Lottery in July.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1996
CONGRESS, Ariz. -- Gary and Lori Morris are trying to eke out a living selling canned goods, ammunition and other essentials in this tiny outpost in the Arizona desert. Their business was growing nicely until last fall -- when the state put a new lottery computer in their store on a dusty stretch of Highway 71.The machine stubbornly refused to sell and validate lottery tickets. Even when it worked, the Morrises say, it operated sluggishly on many occasions.As a result, angry customers took their grocery and lottery business to the next town, where some chain supermarkets were having better luck with their ticket machines.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1996
Maryland lottery players and sellers yesterday reported a lessening of the computer problems that beset them Monday, but some of the pink computers continued to work erratically or not at all.About 200 of the almost 3,800 new lottery terminals statewide remained out of service on Automated Wagering International's second day on the job. AWI, a lottery contractor with a troubled past, began running the state's $1 billion-a-year lottery business Monday.Maryland...
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Lisa Respers and Marina Sarris and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Mike Farabaugh contributed to this article | August 20, 1996
Some lottery terminals across Maryland refused to sell tickets, read play slips or validate winners yesterday as a new contractor took over running the state's $1 billion-a-year lottery business.But upbeat lottery officials said that only 200 of the almost 3,800 terminals statewide were out of service as of 4 p.m., and they said they were satisfied with Automated Wagering International's first day on the job."These are normal glitches in a start-up," said acting lottery director William W. Saltzman.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
The beleaguered company that was scheduled to take over Maryland's lottery games next month told state officials yesterday it needs an extra 28 days to get ready.The request for a delay came after the company, Automated Wagering International Inc. -- which recently was fired by Arizona's lottery for poor performance -- delivered flawed software to Maryland this month, a state lottery official said.At a hastily called meeting in Annapolis, top state legislators greeted news of the request nervously and, in some cases, angrily.
NEWS
June 6, 1996
STATE LAWMAKERS are rightly concerned about the State Lottery Agency's transition to a new computer system next month, when AWI Inc. succeeds GTECH Corp. as the contractor running the lottery games. AWI, after all, just lost its Arizona lottery contract over allegations of poor performance. Will that happen here?The legislature's fiscal analysts indicated there might be problems. But the evidence turned out to be superficial at a hearing this week. It badly misled state lawmakers, who thought (incorrectly)
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1996
Worried state legislators told Maryland lottery officials yesterday to develop a backup plan in case their new contractor fails to perform when it takes over lottery operations next month.Legislators said they were alarmed that the contractor, Automated Wagering International, was fired by the Arizona lottery last month for poor performance. AWI is installing a computer system in Maryland that is similar, although larger and more complex, than the one rejected by Arizona."We think you should come up with a contingency plan," said Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell, a Baltimore County Democrat.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1996
CONGRESS, Ariz. -- Gary and Lori Morris are trying to eke out a living selling canned goods, ammunition and other essentials in this tiny outpost in the Arizona desert. Their business was growing nicely until last fall -- when the state put a new lottery computer in their store on a dusty stretch of Highway 71.The machine stubbornly refused to sell and validate lottery tickets. Even when it worked, the Morrises say, it operated sluggishly on many occasions.As a result, angry customers took their grocery and lottery business to the next town, where some chain supermarkets were having better luck with their ticket machines.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1996
Legislative leaders in Annapolis expressed concern yesterday over Arizona's decision to terminate its contract with the company that will be taking over Maryland's $1 billion-a-year lottery business in July.But they conceded the state can do little except monitor the progress of the company, Automated Wagering International, which has a five-year contract to operate Maryland's lottery system."We don't have any choice at this time, but certainly we should proceed with caution," said Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. "We pay people big dollars to make decisions like that for us, and if they mess up, their heads are going to roll."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Lisa Respers and Marina Sarris and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Mike Farabaugh contributed to this article | August 20, 1996
Some lottery terminals across Maryland refused to sell tickets, read play slips or validate winners yesterday as a new contractor took over running the state's $1 billion-a-year lottery business.But upbeat lottery officials said that only 200 of the almost 3,800 terminals statewide were out of service as of 4 p.m., and they said they were satisfied with Automated Wagering International's first day on the job."These are normal glitches in a start-up," said acting lottery director William W. Saltzman.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1996
Legislative leaders in Annapolis expressed concern yesterday over Arizona's decision to terminate its contract with the company that will be taking over Maryland's $1 billion-a-year lottery business in July.But they conceded the state can do little except monitor the progress of the company, Automated Wagering International, which has a five-year contract to operate Maryland's lottery system."We don't have any choice at this time, but certainly we should proceed with caution," said Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. "We pay people big dollars to make decisions like that for us, and if they mess up, their heads are going to roll."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
PHOENIX -- Citing poor performance, the Arizona Lottery dumped the company yesterday that will be taking over Maryland's $1 billion-a-year lottery business.In a drastic step, the lottery commission voted unanimously to terminate its 6-month-old contract with Automated Wagering International after frustrated members learned that it would take another six months for the computer system to be working properly.The computer system Arizona rejected is very similar to the one AWI plans to install for the Maryland Lottery in July.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1996
The company that will be taking over Maryland's $1 billion-a-year lottery business is having big troubles in Arizona, where persistent glitches have marred its first few months of running that state's lottery.The problems have worried the treasurer of Kentucky, where a lottery contract with the company is pending, and prompted speculation about what is in store for Maryland.The contractor, Automated Wagering International Inc., is facing hefty fines over computer problems that have kept the Arizona lottery from collecting more than $14 million in instant ticket receipts from stores.
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