Advertisement
HomeCollectionsArithmetic
IN THE NEWS

Arithmetic

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 2, 1994
There is a third party to baseball's latest labor-management war, which the owners and players may be underestimating. The fans.Most experts discount fan displeasure because it has not seriously materialized in the last seven work stoppages. Yet given the mystical place baseball holds in our psyche, who knows what fan support would have been without the strikes and lockouts? Mystiques are not shatter-proof.For the ordinary fan, it's hard to muster sympathy for millionaire ballplayers and multi-millionaire owners.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Hensley | October 13, 2014
I've taught math at Oakland Mills High School in Howard County for seven years. In that time, I've read hundreds of articles about the problems in American math education. But I've yet to see a mention of the single biggest crisis I face in my classroom. Howard County has a policy of placing every ninth grade student into at least Algebra I - even if the student is currently doing math at a fourth grade level. As a direct result of this policy, students enter my classroom lacking essential prerequisite knowledge.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jack Valenti | November 11, 1992
BILL Clinton triumphed because Americans chose to march under his banner of change.That means he should junk a Republican innovation and, like John F. Kennedy, not create a chief of staff.Presidents Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson did just fine. Neither had a chief of staff.Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Gerald R. Ford, Ronald Reagan and George Bush did.Many of those chiefs of staff resigned in disgrace, performed below par, were flung aside or went to jail.Over 40 years, of those who served any length of time, Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld, Jack Watson and James Baker were among the few who were quality performers.
NEWS
March 3, 2013
Letter writer Alvin Bobers' attempt to make a new gas tax increase seem insignificant does not pass muster ("Gas tax arithmetic," Feb. 27). Yes, a lot of vehicles are rated for 30 mpg, but how many actually get that mileage? And 40 mpg is in the future, probably, but it's not here yet. Even if a vehicle does get 30 mpg on the highway, you can't assume it spends most of its time on a highway. The assumption that most people already have high-mileage cars is just that, an assumption.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | March 10, 1993
Teachers' salaries. A parent-friendly school environment. Reading, writing and arithmetic, including balancing checkbooks. Business partnerships. Budget constraints.Those are some of the issues the five candidates for the lone Anne Arundel County school board seat that opens July 1 believe are important.The public will get its first chance to meet the candidates tonight when they are introduced at 7 p.m. at the Arundel Center by County Executive Robert R. Neall and members of the county School Board Nominating Convention Committee.
NEWS
By Michael Hensley | October 13, 2014
I've taught math at Oakland Mills High School in Howard County for seven years. In that time, I've read hundreds of articles about the problems in American math education. But I've yet to see a mention of the single biggest crisis I face in my classroom. Howard County has a policy of placing every ninth grade student into at least Algebra I - even if the student is currently doing math at a fourth grade level. As a direct result of this policy, students enter my classroom lacking essential prerequisite knowledge.
NEWS
July 21, 2009
For math proficiency, teach students to add better In response to "Student math doesn't add up" (July 12) and the three responses that followed, I would like to reiterate a basic suggestion correctly made by Liz Bowie and bypassed by Higher Education Secretary James Lyons that proficiency in arithmetic is key. Please don't get distracted by the sociopolitical demand for more college math courses, because the result of not addressing the fundamentals is...
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | June 3, 2007
From 1904 to 1939, the one-room Sykesville Colored Schoolhouse provided a basic education in reading, writing and arithmetic to residents such as the 12 children in the Dorsey family. But after the school closed, it became a residence, and then began a long slide toward disrepair. By the time volunteer Patricia Greenwald began restoring the building in 2004, it was a wreck. With donations of time, services and money, she gradually converted the historic building to a town-owned museum.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | October 6, 1993
IN 1965, my third-grade teacher, Mrs. Dixon -- a 200-pound woman not to be trifled with -- delivered the most extraordinary astronomy lesson. "There isn't," she explained to us, "any gravity on the moon.""But Mrs. Dixon," someone protested, "how will the astronauts walk around up there?"Mrs. Dixon lost a beat but quickly rebounded. "They're going to take the gravity along in their shoes!" she replied triumphantly.Now I don't know for a fact that Mrs. Dixon is still imparting notions of portable gravity to her charges in New Jersey elementary schools, but it's a safe bet that she was never fired.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 12, 1992
It's always a pleasure to see an exhibit that has been well conceived, well thought out and well carried out. Sculptor Tex Andrews has done that by curating a four-person show called "Thinking/Rethinking" at the Howard County Center for the Arts; it's not only a good show, it serves as an example of how you do a good show.First, Andrews had a concept: he decided to do a show of works by artists who have been influenced by minimalism. Second, he limited it to four artists, so that, even though the center's two galleries for this show aren't large, each artist got to show a number of works (four or five)
NEWS
February 27, 2013
Here's the simple arithmetic behind the gasoline tax. Gasoline sells, at this time, for a little under $4 a gallon. Most of us have autos that get 30 mpg. In the future we will be able to purchase autos that deliver 40 mpg, or those electric cars that don't use gasoline at all. We will have the same number of autos, at least, on our highways in five years as we do today. Our receipts from the current level of taxation will be down by 30 percent or more because the new autos will consume two-thirds the amount of gasoline.
NEWS
November 14, 2012
Anyone who wondered whether a vote for President Barack Obama meant something should have been reassured by his performance in today's news conference. In the central issue that faces the country right now, whether the resolution to the so-called fiscal cliff will involve higher taxes on the wealthy, he could not have been more clear. Republicans who think they can blackmail the president into backing down on that question, as he did two years ago, had better think again. Mr. Obama outlined several reasons why he was willing to accept an extension of all the Bush tax cuts, including those for the wealthy, at the end of 2010.
NEWS
February 1, 2012
In his column on tax fairness, commentator Bob Price makes a mistake common among conservatives - so common, in fact, that it must be intentional. Price asks "Is it fair that almost half of Americans pay no federal income tax?" ("Let's talk about the meaning of fairness," Jan. 27). There's nothing wrong with this statement because Mr. Price identifies the tax in question. However, later in the column Mr. Price drops the reference to income tax and implies that he is writing about all taxes; for example: "Should the top 1 percent of taxpayers pay more than one-third of the nation's taxes?
NEWS
July 21, 2009
For math proficiency, teach students to add better In response to "Student math doesn't add up" (July 12) and the three responses that followed, I would like to reiterate a basic suggestion correctly made by Liz Bowie and bypassed by Higher Education Secretary James Lyons that proficiency in arithmetic is key. Please don't get distracted by the sociopolitical demand for more college math courses, because the result of not addressing the fundamentals is...
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | August 27, 2007
Welcome back, students. We're sure you had a wonderful summer, but it's important to remember that, as of this moment, your summer is extremely over. It's a new school year, so we're going to jump right in. Please pay attention. Eyes up here. Time to wake up your beach-addled brains with a memory game. Elementary school teachers often use mnemonics, which is just a strange-looking word for a system or method designed to aid the memory. So, which mnemonic device will we be creating today?
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | June 3, 2007
From 1904 to 1939, the one-room Sykesville Colored Schoolhouse provided a basic education in reading, writing and arithmetic to residents such as the 12 children in the Dorsey family. But after the school closed, it became a residence, and then began a long slide toward disrepair. By the time volunteer Patricia Greenwald began restoring the building in 2004, it was a wreck. With donations of time, services and money, she gradually converted the historic building to a town-owned museum.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | October 20, 1990
SEVERAL MINUTES into a demonstration last weekend of a new way to teach algebra, this observer suddenly realized that something was different -- really different:If this was algebra, why was it so much fun?That question suggests another: If learning the concepts behind algebra and the rest of higher math and science can be such a lively, absorbing exercise, why are schoolchildren still approaching algebra with dread -- or, in the case of too many minority and inner-city children -- never approaching it at all?
NEWS
August 28, 2006
Right wing strives to divide the poor Many, many thanks to Cynthia Tucker for "Black men's problems not Mexicans' fault" (Opinion * Commentary, Aug. 21) and to The Sun for publishing her column. Today, right-wing Republicans are engaged in a "divide and rule" strategy to pit immigrants from Mexico and elsewhere against African-Americans and other U.S.-born minorities and working-class whites, and this game must be exposed. These immigrant-hating people who now show fake sympathy for low-income and unemployed African-Americans have, since the administration of President Reagan, been responsible for a whole series of harmful policies that have had devastating consequences.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | September 20, 2006
In retrospect, the ads plastered alongside The Alameda featuring a certain someone's new album could have been a hint. Or maybe the hip-hop station's logo stuck onto the auditorium doors. But students and staff at Winston Middle School had utterly no idea who was about to pay them a visit yesterday. When they finally found out, they went nuts -- the shrieking, fanning-themselves, eyes-tearing-up, smacking-their-friends, heart-clutching, Beatlemania-esque kind of nuts. "It's Diiiiiiiddy!
NEWS
August 28, 2006
Right wing strives to divide the poor Many, many thanks to Cynthia Tucker for "Black men's problems not Mexicans' fault" (Opinion * Commentary, Aug. 21) and to The Sun for publishing her column. Today, right-wing Republicans are engaged in a "divide and rule" strategy to pit immigrants from Mexico and elsewhere against African-Americans and other U.S.-born minorities and working-class whites, and this game must be exposed. These immigrant-hating people who now show fake sympathy for low-income and unemployed African-Americans have, since the administration of President Reagan, been responsible for a whole series of harmful policies that have had devastating consequences.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.