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By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | December 17, 2000
For my 40th birthday, this year, my mother gave me a diaphanous straw hat and a party to wear it to, a tome about tulips and some clothes for the garden, and Number 260 of the 500 numbered copies of Henry David Thoreau's meandering essay "Of Friendship." Drawn from "A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers" and published by Houghton Mifflin at the turn of the century, the book is thin as a pack of cigarettes, gray as the slate of old roof tiles. According to the only stray marks on its otherwise immaculate pages, it was first uncovered in a bookstore window on 7th Street in Washington, already earning, by April of 1946, the time-honored appreciation "rare."
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SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | June 26, 2008
Full disclosure: When the first snippets surfaced of Shaquille O'Neal dogging Kobe Bryant onstage at a New York club, I laughed. The more I heard, the funnier and more absurd it got. That reaction lasted a couple of minutes. It was just an instinctive reaction, a step ahead of conscious thought. Lots of things are funny in that first moment, right out of someone's mouth, before they're put into real context. Context such as: Here's a 36-year-old father of six, a four-time NBA champion, past MVP and Olympic gold medalist, future Hall of Famer, marketing icon and prominent public figure, hollering profanely into a mike in front of a room full of people about an ex-teammate he still can't stand, even though he swore years ago they'd patched things up. Which brought on this reaction: C'mon, Shaq.
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NEWS
By Donald Elliott | March 15, 1993
IT IS possible that Frank Perdue doesn't realize it, but an Aristotelian he most assuredly is.Aristotle says at one point in his "Politics" that ". . . it is undeniably true that [nature] has made all animals for the sake of man," and also that ". . . plants exist for the sake of animals, and brute beasts for the sake of man."Now Aristotle, as did the Greeks in general, venerated man above all other creatures, and he venerated some men -- those with the "deliberative faculty" -- above others.
NEWS
September 3, 2006
Against Depression By Peter D. Kramer Depression, linked in our culture to a long tradition of "heroic melancholy," is often understood as ennobling -- a source of soulfulness and creativity. Tracing this belief from Aristotle to the Romantics to Picasso, and to present-day memoirs of mood disorder, Peter Kramer, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Brown University and the author of the best-selling Listening to Prozac, suggests that the pervasiveness of the illness has distorted our sense of what it is to be human.
NEWS
September 3, 2006
Against Depression By Peter D. Kramer Depression, linked in our culture to a long tradition of "heroic melancholy," is often understood as ennobling -- a source of soulfulness and creativity. Tracing this belief from Aristotle to the Romantics to Picasso, and to present-day memoirs of mood disorder, Peter Kramer, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Brown University and the author of the best-selling Listening to Prozac, suggests that the pervasiveness of the illness has distorted our sense of what it is to be human.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2004
The Howard County Public Library recommends: Fiction Family Blessings by Fern Michaels A Redbird Christmas: a Novel by Fannie Flagg Silver Bells: a Holiday Tale by Luanne Rice Wedding Ring by Emilie Richards When Christmas Comes by Debbie Macomber Nonfiction Betty Crocker Celebrate!: A Year-round Guide to Holiday Food and Fun by Betty Crocker Knit Socks! : 15 Cool Patterns for Toasty Feet by Betsy McCarthy The Story of Science: Aristotle Leads the Way by Joy Hakim They Made America by Harold Evans The Truth Behind The Da Vinci Code by Bart D. Ehrman
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANNA EISENBERG | January 26, 2006
ELECTRIC FOOTBALL This weekend, join hundreds of others who have discovered electric football. The annual Official Electric Football Super Bowl and Convention attracts electric-football fans from across the country looking for some friendly competition. Visitors can watch the pros play, participate in clinics and enter to win a raffle prize. ....................... The Electric Football Super Bowl and Convention takes place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday at the Embassy Suites Hotel Baltimore North, 213 International Circle in Hunt Valley.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 3, 1996
The mystery of "Oliver's Travels" is not that mysterious, and its satire is often so broad and unevenly drawn it threatens to bring suspension of belief crashing in flames.Such problems would be devastating to most American television movies. But they are merely minor annoyances in this BBC production compared to the sheer delight of watching Alan Bates for 4 1/2 hours as Oliver -- a downsized professor of comparative religion, who instead of going gently into an early retirement sets off on the adventure of his life.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | July 18, 1995
Chicago. -- Pope John Paul II has just issued a statement praising women. They are equal to men after all, though very unlike them. Their special role is nurturing and caring. They humanize the modern world, not submitting to its pressures for ''efficiency and productivity.''I am reminded of the efforts of Southern politicians like Strom Thurmond to say why they have always believed in the equality of blacks and whites. It is just that blacks and whites are different. Blacks, too, are not driven to efficiency and productivity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL COLLIER | February 24, 2002
Aristotle believed metaphor was a "token of genius" because it showed that a poet had "an eye for resemblances." When T.S. Eliot tells us as he does in the opening lines of "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" that "the evening is spread out against the sky / like a patient etherized upon a table," he uses metaphor, simile in particular, to transform forever our experience of the evening. Part of what makes Eliot's simile work is the plausible resemblance between the evening sky and a body lying on a table.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANNA EISENBERG | January 26, 2006
ELECTRIC FOOTBALL This weekend, join hundreds of others who have discovered electric football. The annual Official Electric Football Super Bowl and Convention attracts electric-football fans from across the country looking for some friendly competition. Visitors can watch the pros play, participate in clinics and enter to win a raffle prize. ....................... The Electric Football Super Bowl and Convention takes place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday at the Embassy Suites Hotel Baltimore North, 213 International Circle in Hunt Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2004
The Howard County Public Library recommends: Fiction Family Blessings by Fern Michaels A Redbird Christmas: a Novel by Fannie Flagg Silver Bells: a Holiday Tale by Luanne Rice Wedding Ring by Emilie Richards When Christmas Comes by Debbie Macomber Nonfiction Betty Crocker Celebrate!: A Year-round Guide to Holiday Food and Fun by Betty Crocker Knit Socks! : 15 Cool Patterns for Toasty Feet by Betsy McCarthy The Story of Science: Aristotle Leads the Way by Joy Hakim They Made America by Harold Evans The Truth Behind The Da Vinci Code by Bart D. Ehrman
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL COLLIER | February 24, 2002
Aristotle believed metaphor was a "token of genius" because it showed that a poet had "an eye for resemblances." When T.S. Eliot tells us as he does in the opening lines of "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" that "the evening is spread out against the sky / like a patient etherized upon a table," he uses metaphor, simile in particular, to transform forever our experience of the evening. Part of what makes Eliot's simile work is the plausible resemblance between the evening sky and a body lying on a table.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | December 17, 2000
For my 40th birthday, this year, my mother gave me a diaphanous straw hat and a party to wear it to, a tome about tulips and some clothes for the garden, and Number 260 of the 500 numbered copies of Henry David Thoreau's meandering essay "Of Friendship." Drawn from "A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers" and published by Houghton Mifflin at the turn of the century, the book is thin as a pack of cigarettes, gray as the slate of old roof tiles. According to the only stray marks on its otherwise immaculate pages, it was first uncovered in a bookstore window on 7th Street in Washington, already earning, by April of 1946, the time-honored appreciation "rare."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In the last week of December, some of the top names in philosophy gathered here for the annual meeting of the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association.Were such a gathering to have taken place in a city in Europe -- where intellectuals like Jacques Derrida are regulars on the celebrity circuit -- the media would have trained their attention on the affair, eager to learn the thoughts of this educated elite.But this convention passed, as it does most every year, with hardly anyone outside the prescribed limits of professional philosophy paying any attention.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 3, 1996
The mystery of "Oliver's Travels" is not that mysterious, and its satire is often so broad and unevenly drawn it threatens to bring suspension of belief crashing in flames.Such problems would be devastating to most American television movies. But they are merely minor annoyances in this BBC production compared to the sheer delight of watching Alan Bates for 4 1/2 hours as Oliver -- a downsized professor of comparative religion, who instead of going gently into an early retirement sets off on the adventure of his life.
NEWS
By DAN M. KAHAN & MARTHA C. NUSSBAUM | July 28, 1995
Chicago. -- The jury that convicted Susan Smith for drowning her two children now must decide how she should be punished: by life in prison or death in South Carolina's electric chair.Once again, as it has from the beginning of this case, the question lingers: Is Smith herself a victim of lifelong mental torment who finally ''snapped'' that day at the lake? Or is she a depraved narcissist for whom the children were a burden?Along with a host of other recent cases, including those of Lorena Bobbitt, the battered Virginia woman who impulsively severed her husband's penis, and Lyle and Eric Menendez, who claimed that intense fear drove them to murder their wealthy parents, the Smith case highlights the law's ambivalence toward emotions.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In the last week of December, some of the top names in philosophy gathered here for the annual meeting of the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association.Were such a gathering to have taken place in a city in Europe -- where intellectuals like Jacques Derrida are regulars on the celebrity circuit -- the media would have trained their attention on the affair, eager to learn the thoughts of this educated elite.But this convention passed, as it does most every year, with hardly anyone outside the prescribed limits of professional philosophy paying any attention.
NEWS
By DAN M. KAHAN & MARTHA C. NUSSBAUM | July 28, 1995
Chicago. -- The jury that convicted Susan Smith for drowning her two children now must decide how she should be punished: by life in prison or death in South Carolina's electric chair.Once again, as it has from the beginning of this case, the question lingers: Is Smith herself a victim of lifelong mental torment who finally ''snapped'' that day at the lake? Or is she a depraved narcissist for whom the children were a burden?Along with a host of other recent cases, including those of Lorena Bobbitt, the battered Virginia woman who impulsively severed her husband's penis, and Lyle and Eric Menendez, who claimed that intense fear drove them to murder their wealthy parents, the Smith case highlights the law's ambivalence toward emotions.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | July 18, 1995
Chicago. -- Pope John Paul II has just issued a statement praising women. They are equal to men after all, though very unlike them. Their special role is nurturing and caring. They humanize the modern world, not submitting to its pressures for ''efficiency and productivity.''I am reminded of the efforts of Southern politicians like Strom Thurmond to say why they have always believed in the equality of blacks and whites. It is just that blacks and whites are different. Blacks, too, are not driven to efficiency and productivity.
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