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Aristocrats

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NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | January 22, 2006
THE ARISTOCRATS / / ThinkFilm / $29.99 "No sex. No violence. Unspeakable profanity." That's the tagline for The Aristocrats, a documentary in which 100 comedians tell the same dirty - no, let's ratchet that adjective up and say "filthy" - joke. Please take the warning seriously. This is not a film for everyone. The joke told in The Aristocrats (the film's title is the joke's punch line, and that's pretty much all we can reveal about it in a family newspaper) is irredeemably profane. It contains language taken directly from the gutter, dealing with acts of utter depravity.
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TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
BEIJING -- A friend planning a trip to Beijing opened a map, pointed to a hotel and said, "I should be able to walk from there to the Forbidden City easily, right?" Not easily. In preparation for the Olympics, which begin Aug. 8 and are expected to draw half a million spectators from abroad and 4 billion TV viewers worldwide, the government has gone on a $40 billion building spree to make these the best Games ever and to turn this into a colossal coming-of-age party for a world-class capital.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 26, 1999
NEW YORK -- On this particular day at Christie's auction house, the sale is "Magnificent Jewels." Real ones, alarmingly multi-carated and one accidental nose-itch away from having to mortgage the house.The crowd awaits the auctioneer; surely he will be the silver-tongued Brit of countless Hollywood portrayals who ratchets up bids in a blur of fast talk and cool charm. Instead, in strides Barbara Strongin, all smiles and straightforward demeanor, next-door New Jersey rather than across-the-pond British.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | January 22, 2006
THE ARISTOCRATS / / ThinkFilm / $29.99 "No sex. No violence. Unspeakable profanity." That's the tagline for The Aristocrats, a documentary in which 100 comedians tell the same dirty - no, let's ratchet that adjective up and say "filthy" - joke. Please take the warning seriously. This is not a film for everyone. The joke told in The Aristocrats (the film's title is the joke's punch line, and that's pretty much all we can reveal about it in a family newspaper) is irredeemably profane. It contains language taken directly from the gutter, dealing with acts of utter depravity.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 12, 2005
Heard the one about the documentary that features the same joke told about 100 times? About the joke that's so filthy, you'll never read it in this newspaper (except via some very delicate paraphrasing, which we'll get to later)? About the filmmakers who don't want you to see this if you offend easily? Such is The Aristocrats, in which an all-star lineup of American comics (and a few Brits as well) tells variations of the same off-color joke, one that for decades has been delivered backstage at nightclubs, comedy clubs, friar's clubs and probably some other clubs we dare not mention.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
The Wandering Hill, by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 320 pages. $26. When we last left the Berrybenders, an eccentric, selfish and clueless family of English aristocrats bumbling their way across the American West in the 1880s, they had left their steamer, Rocky Mount, stuck in the ice near the Knife River. They were fish out of water, and the water was frozen solid. In this, the second of Larry McMurtry's four-part saga, the Berrybenders and their entourage have landed at a trading post near the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers, where they will try to survive the winter, the various Indian tribes and each other.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 19, 2004
Assuming that John Ashcroft doesn't shut the show down, the Opera Comique from Paris will continue titillating audiences at the Kennedy Center through Sunday with a fanciful, antic production of Jacques Offenbach's La Vie Parisienne. No wardrobe malfunctions here. Each breast-baring - we're talking the Full Janet - is intentional in a staging that suggests a cross-pollination of Marx Brothers and Mel Brooks movies, the Follies Bergere and even a touch of San Francisco's long-running, over-the-top cabaret Beach Blanket Babylon.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 22, 2005
Once on This Island depicts a world defined by dichotomies -- life and death, love and bigotry, peasants and aristocrats, fairy tales and reality. The Caribbean-set musical also depicts a world overflowing with song, dance and the mythic power of storytelling. All of these elements are exuberantly -- though at times rather raggedly -- celebrated in director/choreographer Kenneth Lee Roberson's production at Center Stage. Composer Stephen Flaherty and lyricist/librettist Lynn Ahrens based this 1990 musical on native Trinidad author Rosa Guy's novel, My Love, My Love, which is, in turn, loosely based on Hans Christian Andersen's The Little Mermaid.
NEWS
By John Brain | November 6, 1996
MONEY TALKS, the saying goes, and most people think that in politics it talks out of turn. Influencing elections with campaign contributions is denounced as corrupting democracy, as PACs, corporations and pressure groups vie to influence elections and ultimately the votes of the candidates they support. We're shocked, shocked. Everywhere the cry goes up for campaign-finance reform.But wait a minute.The democratic ideal has always been just that, a pleasant fiction of popular government by the people for the people and of the people.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 11, 2002
In his spiffy and engrossing Gosford Park, director Robert Altman gathers a group of aristocrats and servants whose lives are made up of trivial pursuits and puts together a game of Cultural Pursuit. He makes it one contest that everyone can learn and win. All you have to do is see and hear. Keep your eyes peeled and your ears open as the guests arrive at the home of Sir William McCordle (Michael Gam- bon) and Lady Sylvia (Kristin Scott Thomas). You'll learn along with the visitors how life is lived at Gosford Park - an estate that cleaves to old-fashioned discipline to avoid confused behavior.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 22, 2005
Once on This Island depicts a world defined by dichotomies -- life and death, love and bigotry, peasants and aristocrats, fairy tales and reality. The Caribbean-set musical also depicts a world overflowing with song, dance and the mythic power of storytelling. All of these elements are exuberantly -- though at times rather raggedly -- celebrated in director/choreographer Kenneth Lee Roberson's production at Center Stage. Composer Stephen Flaherty and lyricist/librettist Lynn Ahrens based this 1990 musical on native Trinidad author Rosa Guy's novel, My Love, My Love, which is, in turn, loosely based on Hans Christian Andersen's The Little Mermaid.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 12, 2005
Heard the one about the documentary that features the same joke told about 100 times? About the joke that's so filthy, you'll never read it in this newspaper (except via some very delicate paraphrasing, which we'll get to later)? About the filmmakers who don't want you to see this if you offend easily? Such is The Aristocrats, in which an all-star lineup of American comics (and a few Brits as well) tells variations of the same off-color joke, one that for decades has been delivered backstage at nightclubs, comedy clubs, friar's clubs and probably some other clubs we dare not mention.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 19, 2004
Assuming that John Ashcroft doesn't shut the show down, the Opera Comique from Paris will continue titillating audiences at the Kennedy Center through Sunday with a fanciful, antic production of Jacques Offenbach's La Vie Parisienne. No wardrobe malfunctions here. Each breast-baring - we're talking the Full Janet - is intentional in a staging that suggests a cross-pollination of Marx Brothers and Mel Brooks movies, the Follies Bergere and even a touch of San Francisco's long-running, over-the-top cabaret Beach Blanket Babylon.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 30, 2003
Katharine Hepburn, who died yesterday at age 96 in her Old Saybrook, Conn., home, won four Academy Awards and held the record for Oscar nominations with 12 until Meryl Streep reached 13 last year. No other movie star, male or female, made so many different roles her own - and made them seem not just her own, but ours, as part of American culture. Her achievement is even more astonishing because she was a natural aristocrat in the rough and tumble of the movies. With her slashing figure, bone structure and voice, Ms. Hepburn could have become a caricature of "class."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
The Wandering Hill, by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 320 pages. $26. When we last left the Berrybenders, an eccentric, selfish and clueless family of English aristocrats bumbling their way across the American West in the 1880s, they had left their steamer, Rocky Mount, stuck in the ice near the Knife River. They were fish out of water, and the water was frozen solid. In this, the second of Larry McMurtry's four-part saga, the Berrybenders and their entourage have landed at a trading post near the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers, where they will try to survive the winter, the various Indian tribes and each other.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 11, 2002
In his spiffy and engrossing Gosford Park, director Robert Altman gathers a group of aristocrats and servants whose lives are made up of trivial pursuits and puts together a game of Cultural Pursuit. He makes it one contest that everyone can learn and win. All you have to do is see and hear. Keep your eyes peeled and your ears open as the guests arrive at the home of Sir William McCordle (Michael Gam- bon) and Lady Sylvia (Kristin Scott Thomas). You'll learn along with the visitors how life is lived at Gosford Park - an estate that cleaves to old-fashioned discipline to avoid confused behavior.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1997
LEESBURG, Va. -- Standing near stone pillars that flank the entrance to a 1,000-acre horse farm, Bruce DeAtley tries to imagine the future of these Loudoun County pastures, hayfields and woods just 35 miles from Washington."
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
BEIJING -- A friend planning a trip to Beijing opened a map, pointed to a hotel and said, "I should be able to walk from there to the Forbidden City easily, right?" Not easily. In preparation for the Olympics, which begin Aug. 8 and are expected to draw half a million spectators from abroad and 4 billion TV viewers worldwide, the government has gone on a $40 billion building spree to make these the best Games ever and to turn this into a colossal coming-of-age party for a world-class capital.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and By Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 26, 2001
BEIJING - When people think of skiing, Beijing doesn't immediately spring to mind. The Chinese capital is crowded with 13 million people, and winter usually brings less than an inch of precipitation. But here was Li Huayun, the bespectacled chief of a state-owned radio communications company, standing atop a 1,090-yard ski run just north of the capital, participating in the most fashionable winter sport in the world's most populous country. "It's like floating," Li said with a grin, glancing down at the scores of skiers sliding around the foot of the mountain.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 26, 1999
NEW YORK -- On this particular day at Christie's auction house, the sale is "Magnificent Jewels." Real ones, alarmingly multi-carated and one accidental nose-itch away from having to mortgage the house.The crowd awaits the auctioneer; surely he will be the silver-tongued Brit of countless Hollywood portrayals who ratchets up bids in a blur of fast talk and cool charm. Instead, in strides Barbara Strongin, all smiles and straightforward demeanor, next-door New Jersey rather than across-the-pond British.
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