Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAristocracy
IN THE NEWS

Aristocracy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By RAFAEL ALVAREZ | February 24, 1991
"THE MAD ALBINO from Beaumont" is just beginning to warm up the crowd at Hammerjack's in South Baltimore. Tattoos of flaming monsters and shooting stars ripple blue and green and red on his milk-white skin as his muscles tighten around his guitar.At the back of the club, roadie Bobby Peterson sells "Johnny Winter . . . 25 Years on the Road" T-shirts for $20 each with the help of a portable American Express charge plate.Nearby, a skinny young woman in a puffed white party dress balances her rear-end on a railing, snapping gum and swinging her legs like a little kid on the playground.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 25, 2009
Emory G. Evans, a noted professor of Colonial American history at the University of Maryland, College Park, who wrote widely on the subject, died Sunday of a heart attack at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring. The Beltsville resident was 81. Dr. Evans, the son of a Methodist minister and a homemaker, was born and raised in Richmond, Va. He was a graduate of Amelia High School in Amelia, Va., and earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1950 from Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Va. After serving in the Army, he earned a master's degree in 1954 and a doctorate three years later in Colonial American history from the University of Virginia.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 3, 1995
"IT was through the Declaration of Independence that we Americans acknowledged the eternal inequality of man. For by it we abolished a cut-and-dried aristocracy. We had seen little men artificially held up in high places, and our own justice-loving hearts abhorred this violence to human nature. Therefore, we decreed that every man should thenceforth have equal liberty to find his own level. By this very decree we acknowledged and gave freedom to true aristocracy, saying, 'Let the best man win, whoever he is.'"Let the best man win!
NEWS
By Joel Kotkin and Fred Siegel | December 9, 2007
After decades on the political sidelines, liberalism is making a comeback. Polls show plunging support for Republicans and their brand of conservatism among young, independent voters and Latinos. But what kind of liberalism is emerging as the dominant voice in the Democratic Party? Well, it isn't the ideology that defended the interests and values of the middle and working classes. The old liberalism had its flaws, but it also inspired increased social and economic mobility, strong protections for unions, the funding of a national highway system and a network of public parks, and the development of viable public schools.
NEWS
By MICHAEL LIND | June 23, 1995
For months I've been looking forward to the release of Walt Disney's animated musical ''Pocahontas.'' The idea of a heart-warming family musical based on the early history of English colonization in Virginia is nothing short of amazing. It is as though the Muppets or the Ice Capades were to do a version of ''Aguirre: The Wrath of God.''From 1607, when the Susan Constant, Godspeed and Discovery sailed up the James River, until 1646, the English colonists were in an almost constant state of war with the Algonquin federation called the Powhatans after the father of Pocahontas.
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | July 14, 2003
MAYBE IT'S time for a return trip, eh, Mr. de Tocqueville? And what could be better than to apply for your U.S. visa today - Bastille Day, France's Independence Day, which, let's face it, owes a certain debt to America's successful revolt against England just a few years before. Allors, mon ami, you haven't been here for 172 years, and a lot's happened in that time. Why, just in your own country, there've been three wars with Germany, impressionism, Dadaism, Sartre, Truffaut, Deneuve, Bardot and an odd fascination with a Yankee clown named Jerry Lewis.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 9, 2001
Late 19th century England loved Oscar Wilde's plays but loathed Oscar Wilde the man. A century later, he has certainly come into his own. When David Hare's "The Judas Kiss" opened on Broadway three years ago it was part of a surge of interest in the Irish-born writer that hasn't abated. A revival of the one-man show "The Importance of Being Oscar" opened off-Broadway earlier this week, a new biography has just been published, as have Wilde's complete letters. So Columbia's Rep Stage is right in the thick of things with its admirable area premiere of "The Judas Kiss."
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 29, 1991
You can tell the November sweeps month is over -- there are no gruesome stories of intra-family murder on the tube this weekend. Instead, December begins with a surprising amount of good television.Actually, the first dose of welcome post-sweeps fare is on the last day of November as NBC's "Dame Edna's Hollywood" will be on Channel 2 (WMAR) tomorrow night at 10 o'clock.Dame Edna is something of a phenomenon in Britain where everybody who is anybody just has to be on her talk show, or, as they call it on that side of the Atlantic, chat show.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield | July 9, 1991
"The Annapolis I Remember," a theatrical presentation that brings oral histories and photographs of 20th-century Annapolis to the stage, has been performed previously, but Sunday's show before a packed house at Key Auditorium was my first go at it.What an enchanting piece of theater it is. Derived from Mame Warren's remarkable pictorial history of our town, "Then Again . . . Annapolis, 1900-1965," which also has just made my acquaintance, the piece employs a talented sextetof actors plus pianist Loraine Shaw to bring home the message that the defining energy of Annapolis is the sum of the people who've made their lives here.
NEWS
By Joel Kotkin and Fred Siegel | December 9, 2007
After decades on the political sidelines, liberalism is making a comeback. Polls show plunging support for Republicans and their brand of conservatism among young, independent voters and Latinos. But what kind of liberalism is emerging as the dominant voice in the Democratic Party? Well, it isn't the ideology that defended the interests and values of the middle and working classes. The old liberalism had its flaws, but it also inspired increased social and economic mobility, strong protections for unions, the funding of a national highway system and a network of public parks, and the development of viable public schools.
NEWS
By Nicholas Leonhardt | November 3, 2004
IF THE TEEN-AGE years are a series of teachable moments interspersed with really loud rock music, then what did Election 2004 teach American youths? Some possibilities: Take a debate class. Of course, it may not boost a teen's social status like kicking the winning field goal at homecoming, but who knew that debate skills could separate the winners from the losers? In media-driven, image-conscious America, it's not enough to have a well-defined plan for success; one must also articulate it well.
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | July 14, 2003
MAYBE IT'S time for a return trip, eh, Mr. de Tocqueville? And what could be better than to apply for your U.S. visa today - Bastille Day, France's Independence Day, which, let's face it, owes a certain debt to America's successful revolt against England just a few years before. Allors, mon ami, you haven't been here for 172 years, and a lot's happened in that time. Why, just in your own country, there've been three wars with Germany, impressionism, Dadaism, Sartre, Truffaut, Deneuve, Bardot and an odd fascination with a Yankee clown named Jerry Lewis.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | July 23, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas -- There's some stiff competition in the Stupidest Thing Said Yet department about the swoon in the financial markets. But among the heavy contenders we must surely count those who are now saying they know who's responsible, and it is us. According to this theory, you, me and Joe Doaks made Ken Lay do it. Came as a surprise to me, too. Naturally, as a liberal, I just love guilt, so I was ready to sign right up for this one, but try as...
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 9, 2001
Late 19th century England loved Oscar Wilde's plays but loathed Oscar Wilde the man. A century later, he has certainly come into his own. When David Hare's "The Judas Kiss" opened on Broadway three years ago it was part of a surge of interest in the Irish-born writer that hasn't abated. A revival of the one-man show "The Importance of Being Oscar" opened off-Broadway earlier this week, a new biography has just been published, as have Wilde's complete letters. So Columbia's Rep Stage is right in the thick of things with its admirable area premiere of "The Judas Kiss."
NEWS
July 3, 1995
"IT was through the Declaration of Independence that we Americans acknowledged the eternal inequality of man. For by it we abolished a cut-and-dried aristocracy. We had seen little men artificially held up in high places, and our own justice-loving hearts abhorred this violence to human nature. Therefore, we decreed that every man should thenceforth have equal liberty to find his own level. By this very decree we acknowledged and gave freedom to true aristocracy, saying, 'Let the best man win, whoever he is.'"Let the best man win!
NEWS
By MICHAEL LIND | June 23, 1995
For months I've been looking forward to the release of Walt Disney's animated musical ''Pocahontas.'' The idea of a heart-warming family musical based on the early history of English colonization in Virginia is nothing short of amazing. It is as though the Muppets or the Ice Capades were to do a version of ''Aguirre: The Wrath of God.''From 1607, when the Susan Constant, Godspeed and Discovery sailed up the James River, until 1646, the English colonists were in an almost constant state of war with the Algonquin federation called the Powhatans after the father of Pocahontas.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | July 23, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas -- There's some stiff competition in the Stupidest Thing Said Yet department about the swoon in the financial markets. But among the heavy contenders we must surely count those who are now saying they know who's responsible, and it is us. According to this theory, you, me and Joe Doaks made Ken Lay do it. Came as a surprise to me, too. Naturally, as a liberal, I just love guilt, so I was ready to sign right up for this one, but try as...
NEWS
By Nicholas Leonhardt | November 3, 2004
IF THE TEEN-AGE years are a series of teachable moments interspersed with really loud rock music, then what did Election 2004 teach American youths? Some possibilities: Take a debate class. Of course, it may not boost a teen's social status like kicking the winning field goal at homecoming, but who knew that debate skills could separate the winners from the losers? In media-driven, image-conscious America, it's not enough to have a well-defined plan for success; one must also articulate it well.
NEWS
By JONATHAN SCHELL | September 1, 1993
New York. -- "The Radicalism of the American Revolution,'' by Gordon S. Wood -- a recent book that seems destined to take its place among those that change the way the United States thinks about itself -- sheds light on the federal budget deficit crisis, which has stood at the center of our political life now for more than a decade.In the crisis, the conflict between society's common interest and the particular interests of its members is crystallized in numerical terms. For the deficit is nothing but the figure obtained by subtracting the sum of the particular benefits we demand of government from the amount we collectively are willing to pay for them.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | October 24, 1992
History is being reinvented at the Maryland Historical Society.In stark departure from the society's standard exhibitions -- which tend to focus on the sensibilities of Maryland's white aristocracy -- "Mining the Museum" presents a disturbing, intimate portrait of slavery.Fred Wilson's acclaimed work of art, on display through February, has been a catalyst for change that is likely to affect future exhibits, programming and outreach programs at the historical society, a private, non-profit museum and library said to be the single largest repository of Maryland's cultural heritage.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.