Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAristide
IN THE NEWS

Aristide

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 14, 1994
President Jean-Bertrand Aristide returns to a Haiti tomorrow that for a brief, turbulent interlude has been completely under the control of Americans he once accused of wanting "to hold our guts in their hands," of seeking to make Haiti "economically, politically and culturally dependent." Yet it is one of the ironies of the Haitian situation that his return from exile has been made possible only by making Haiti's dependency on the United States near-total. Twenty thousand American troops are the muscle of law and order; the American Embassy is effectively the seat of government.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 23, 2006
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has the constitutional right to return to Haiti whenever he chooses but might want to keep in mind that charges have been filed against him, President-elect Rene Preval said yesterday. In his first major public statement since being declared the winner last week of a Feb. 7 election marred by tabulation delays and fraud allegations, Preval was pressed by reporters about Aristide's announcement a day earlier that he was ready to come home after two years in African exile.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- CIA allegations to Congress that exiled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide underwent psychiatric treatment in a Canadian hospital are false, the Miami Herald has learned.The allegations slowed the momentum of the U.S. campaign to return Father Aristide to power, fortified the Haitian leader's critics and embarrassed President Clinton, who supports Father Aristide, by placing him at odds with CIA experts.The Herald obtained a letter from Father Aristide authorizing it to retrieve any records for psychiatric treatment for him at the Louis-H.
NEWS
By TIM COLLIE and TIM COLLIE,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | February 14, 2006
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Tens of thousands of angry protesters filled the streets of the capital yesterday, setting fire to barricades, storming a luxury hotel and demanding that front-runner Rene Preval be declared the winner of last week's presidential election. At least two people were killed and several injured in gunfire in the Tabarre neighborhood near the international airport. Witnesses interviewed on Haitian radio blamed United Nation peacekeepers, but a U.N. spokesman denied that troops had fired on protesters.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 22, 1995
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- In a show of strength that consolidates its control over the remnants of the Haitian armed forces, the government of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide announced a purge of the military yesterday that virtually wipes out the country's senior officer corps.All four of the Haitian army's generals, including the military commander in chief, Gen. Bernardin Poisson, and 39 colonels and majors were affected by the order, according to a Haitian government statement and local newspaper and radio reports.
NEWS
By P. J. Slavin and P. J. Slavin,Contributing Writer | June 16, 1993
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide is expected to reject an offer from Haiti's Parliament to restore him to the presidency, just as the Parliament hoped he would.In a hollow gesture to block a worldwide petroleum embargo, Haiti's army-backed Parliament voted yesterday to restore recognition to the man the military removed in a bloody 1991 coup.Parliamentarians who supported the vote said they expected Father Aristide to reject the offer -- a rejection, they say, that is part of their strategy to paint him as an unreliable negotiator and thus curtail international support for him.They believe their action will be well received by an international community seeking a way to end this crisis.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | October 25, 1993
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- U.N. officials here were assessing an 11th-hour proposal by opposition lawmakers that could enable exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to return this week.However, no one seemed prepared last night to say whether the proposal could put Haiti back on the path to democracy and end its political crisis.The lawmakers' plan suggests a series of compromises in the U.N.-brokered accord signed in July by Father Aristide and the army commander, Lt. Gen. Raoul Cedras.That accord would have returned Father Aristide to Haiti on Saturday in exchange for the general's resignation.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 23, 2006
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide has the constitutional right to return to Haiti whenever he chooses but might want to keep in mind that charges have been filed against him, President-elect Rene Preval said yesterday. In his first major public statement since being declared the winner last week of a Feb. 7 election marred by tabulation delays and fraud allegations, Preval was pressed by reporters about Aristide's announcement a day earlier that he was ready to come home after two years in African exile.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 26, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- The open and bitter conflict between the Clinton administration and Jean-Bertrand Aristide has left the military here confident that it has defeated conclusively all attempts to restore the exiled Haitian president to power, according to diplomats and Haitian political experts."
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | October 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration has tied the restoration of democracy in Haiti to the restoration of its democratically elected leader, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, a bespectacled sliver of a man who is the heart and soul of the impoverished core of his country.But many political observers, including some members of Congress, argue that a democratic election does not a democrat make.They say that, although Father Aristide was, indeed, elected by a two-thirds majority in Haiti's first fair and free election ever, the deposed leader's brief residency at the sprawling white presidential palace in Port-au-Prince showed few signs of democracy and, in fact, instilled terror in non-supporters.
NEWS
February 12, 2006
Haitians lined up by the thousands last week at polling stations throughout their troubled country and made a statement that caught many observers, including Haitians themselves, by surprise. Despite two years of political uncertainty and economic instability, four canceled elections and widespread violence and despair, they made clear that they want and believe in democracy. To make this point, more than 50 percent of courageous eligible voters set aside legitimate fears of election-day bloodshed and waited for hours at polling places caught unprepared for the crowds.
NEWS
May 29, 2005
MOST AMERICANS HAVE never heard of Yvon Neptune, the jailed former prime minister of Haiti who has been on a hunger strike since April 17, but his decision to starve himself speaks volumes about the failure of U.S. policy in Haiti. And it underscores the hypocrisy of the Bush administration's policy of engaged diplomacy in defense of human rights and democracy around the world. Mr. Neptune has been held without trial in a Haitian prison since June 2004. He is refusing food to protest his detention for allegedly ordering the massacre of 50 opponents of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, whose government Mr. Neptune served.
NEWS
March 30, 2005
U.S. aid helps Haiti to reach brighter future Tom Reeves' assertion that the United States "forced" former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to leave Haiti is grossly inaccurate ("Restore Haitian democracy," Opinion * Commentary, March 24). His condemnation of U.S. policy toward Haiti since Mr. Aristide's departure is also baseless. The facts are these: On Feb. 29, 2004, armed paramilitary gangs once used by Mr. Aristide to terrorize his enemies turned on him and threatened to continue a violent upheaval to force him from office.
NEWS
By Tom Reeves | March 24, 2005
PRESIDENT BUSH says his foreign policy goal is to bring freedom to the world, but perhaps events in Haiti will reveal what kind of freedom Mr. Bush has in mind. Just over a year ago, U.S. Marines forced democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to leave the country. This "modern-style kidnapping," as Mr. Aristide called it, occurred after weeks of rampant brutality carried out by thugs and the former Haitian military to topple the legitimate Aristide government. But instead of intervening to support democracy, the United States covertly financed these "rebels" - many of whom had been convicted of human rights violations from the previous coup period in the 1990s.
NEWS
December 12, 2004
TO SAY THAT Haiti is on the brink of disaster would be a major understatement, 10 months after it became a rudderless nation. The island is riding a wave of catastrophe heading straight for calamity. Heavily armed gangs terrorize the streets of the teeming capital, Port-au-Prince, while opposing, equally fortified militias run the countryside. Interim leaders, who billed themselves as experienced technocrats who could hit the ground running, are still trying to figure out what political ground to stand on. Having dismissed the demands of supporters of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, they underestimated the resolve of those violently agitating for his return.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 31, 2004
PETIONVILLE, Haiti - In crisp new camouflage uniforms, automatic rifles at the ready, militia members from the disbanded Haitian army rumble out of their hilltop villa compound in a daily show of force to comfort the elite and intimidate armed radicals paralyzing the capital below. Five miles downhill, in the most desperate neighborhoods of Port-au-Prince, the army of the slums trains its own weapons and anger on government and commerce. For three weeks, the gunmen have been sniping at port workers, police and United Nations peacekeepers, taking aim at any semblance of order eight months after President Jean-Bertrand Aristide fled the country on a U.S.-chartered jet. Interim Prime Minister Gerard Latortue sits halfway between the two forces, at least geographically.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 29, 1995
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- With the United States scheduled to hand over responsibility for Haiti's security to the United Nations this week, President Jean-Bertrand Aristide asked the international force yesterday to intensify efforts to disarm those he called "opponents of democracy."Conditions are now "safe and stable enough to have that transition," Mr. Aristide said in a morning interview at his residence. But, he added, the situation "has to become safer day after day" in order for democracy and the rule of law to take root, and that will require peacekeepers to move aggressively against the remnants of the paramilitary groups that terrorized Haiti for three years.
NEWS
October 10, 2004
THERE WAS A TIME when democratically challenged and perennially troubled Haiti appeared to be on the precipice of change that would finally rid the island of a crippling political crisis and get it back on track in its slow march toward democracy. It was 1994, and Jean-Bertrand Aristide, Haiti's first freely elected president, was restored to power largely due to the efforts of a group of nations led by the United States calling themselves the "Friends of Haiti." What a difference a decade makes.
NEWS
June 2, 2004
BEFORE THE RAINS ravaged towns in southern Haiti, killing 1,300, this impoverished nation faced a dire situation. Haitians were struggling to feed their families in a country torn by political strife and wracked by sectarian violence. The ouster of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in February had not improved everyday life for most Haitians, and the flooding only exacerbated conditions there. Emergency relief efforts have been forthcoming, but the problems plaguing Haiti demand a greater response from the international community.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.