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NEWS
February 12, 1991
He was a self-made man from an impoverished home who quit school at 14, earned his high school diploma at 27, worked his way through college, established a medical practice in Annapolis and blazed a distinguished trail of political and civil-rights "firsts." Aris T. Allen led by example, serving as a worthy role model for several generations of blacks in this state.Dr. Allen grew up in a segregated America, quietly fighting civil rights battles while establishing a medical practice with his wife in Maryland's capital city, where they tended to the needs of that city's poor black community for decades.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
When he was 13, Thomas Lauderdale's world in Portland, Ore., opened up wide. That was when the future founder of the ensemble called Pink Martini saw the 1946 Rita Hayworth film "Gilda" for the first time. "I loved the 1940s glamour and all that," Lauderdale, now 43, said. "What's distressing is that it's being lost. We're in real trouble these days because of reality television. I yearn for the grace and elegance of the past. " Lauderdale has been doing his best to reclaim some of those old qualities through the music of Pink Martini, which has been performing highly stylish arrangements of vintage songs since 1994.
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NEWS
February 10, 1991
A private funeral for Delegate Aris T. Allen, who died Friday i an apparent suicide, has been planned for Wednesday by his family.The public is invited to visit from noon to 9 p.m. on Tuesday at the Hicks Funeral Home, 1922 Forest Drive in Annapolis, where the family plan to be present from 7 to 8 p.m.Dr. Allen, who was 80, broke racial barriers through careers in medicine and politics.He was the first black person in Anne Arundel County to win election to the legislature, serving two terms in the House of Delegates and three years in the Senate, and the first of his race to win nomination to statewide office in 1978 as the running mate of Republican gubernatorial candidate J. Glenn Beall Jr.A former state Republican Party chairman, Dr. Allen returned to the legislature after an eight-year absence by winning election last fall to his old 30th District seat.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
The 25-year-old Baltimore-based law firm Offit Kurman recently formed a pioneering mortgage compliance affiliate, C3 Compliance Consultants, to help lenders across the United States conform with regulations launched this year by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), a creation of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. Veteran mortgage banking and employment law attorney Ari Karen is founder and director of the new venture. C3's services are in high demand by companies from Los Angeles to Boston, Karen said.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | December 29, 1991
Dr. Aris T. Allen, who vaulted so many obstacles in his life as a laborer, medical doctor and legislator, confronted in the winter of 1991 a most formidable foe: terminal prostate cancer. And when he heard the diagnosis, he seized control of his fate in his own way.News of his suicide on Feb. 8 came hard on the heels of his latest accomplishment in a life of achievement. Three months before, the 80-year-old Allen had completed his political comeback by winning a House of Delegates seat in Anne Arundel County's 30th District, becoming the lone black Republican in the General Assembly.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | November 1, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A decade ago, Aris T. Allen won his battle in the state legislature to keep a proposed road extension from plowing through and uprooting a black community off Forest Drive.Yesterday, state officials honored the pioneer who paved the way for improved race relations in the state by naming the 1.2-mile stretch of highway -- completed in April -- Aris T. Allen Boulevard."Some people may wonder, why a road?" said Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall. "He took people from where they were to where they wanted to go. I don't think I'll be able to drive down this boulevard without thinking of Mr. Allen."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | November 1, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A decade ago, Aris T. Allen won his battle in the state legislature to keep a proposed road extension from plowing through and uprooting a black community off Forest Drive.Yesterday, state officials honored the pioneer who paved the way for improved race relations in the state by naming the 1.2-mile stretch of highway -- completed in April -- Aris T. Allen Boulevard."Some people may wonder, why a road?" said Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall. "He took people from where they were to where they wanted to go. I don't think I'll be able to drive down this boulevard without thinking of Mr. Allen."
NEWS
July 7, 2000
RACISTS CAN'T tarnish Aris T. Allen's legacy. Sure, they can ignorantly place a pillowcase over his statue's head, but they can't cloak the enlightenment he brought. They can tape Confederate battle flags to the image's hands on Independence Day, but they can't touch what the late African-American legislator stood for -- racial equality and tolerance. Allen bridged racial divisions while serving in the state legislature over four decades. Nine years after his death, he remains a towering symbol of our attempts to triumph over mindless hate.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2000
A piece of duct tape lying in a flower bed at the foot of the Aris T. Allen statue was all that remained yesterday from an attack with symbols of racial hatred on the Annapolis memorial to the prominent black physician and politician. An Annapolis police officer spotted the vandalism about 6:30 a.m. on Independence Day. A white pillowcase hood had been placed on the statue's head, and Confederate flags had been taped to its hands. The incident is being investigated as a hate crime. "We take this very seriously," said Officer Eric Crane, a city police spokesman.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2001
In its seven-year existence, the Annapolis memorial to pioneering black physician and politician Aris T. Allen has endured more than its share of indignities. Confederate flags have been taped to the statue's hands, a hangman's noose was once wrapped around its neck, and, in the most recent incident, a white pillowcase - with eyeholes and a painted red smiley face - was placed on its head. The repeated acts of racially tinged vandalism have spurred civil rights activists and members of Allen's family to propose moving the statue to a garden area between the new $20 million Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. Senate Office Building and the James Senate Office Building in Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | August 21, 2011
Why isn't "Entourage" pulling out all of the stops in its final season? The stakes have felt small each episode (with the exception being the quickly brushed aside suicide). Last season's arc of Vince and his drug use gave the show an emotional weight it had always missed. We're now halfway through the last season and the climax it's building to feels insignificant. Episode 5, titled "Motherf-----," was long scenes of one-on-one dialogue without much action. "Entourage" has rarely asked its characters to make their characters seem relatably real or empathetic, but this episode called for actual acting . Let's break down the episode by ranking how compelling each characters' storylines felt: 1.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
Sharp and svelte but also funny, Nicole Ari Parker typically hits the screen as put-together characters like Eddie Murphy's ex-wife in "Imagine This. " So she leapt at the chance to play Zenobia, the comically confused sportscaster heroine of "35 and Ticking. " Parker was born in Washington and raised in Baltimore from age 2. She also lived for six years as an adult in Atlanta. "35 and Ticking" opens Friday in Atlanta, D.C., and in Baltimore at the AMC Owings Mills and the AMC Security Square.
NEWS
June 11, 2009
On June 7, 2009, ARIE E. Friends may call at the CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240 Reisterstown Road, Thursday 2 to 8 PM. The family will receive friends at the above chapel Friday 11 AM. Funeral services will begin 11:30AM. Interment Arbutus Memorial Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | April 30, 2009
Like countless other artists recording for major labels, India.Arie found herself at odds with the demands of the pop machine. How much of her art - or herself - was she willing to compromise for a hit? Why couldn't the suits at the label just let her deliver her music without the artificial additives? In the nine years since her lauded debut, Acoustic Soul, the urban-pop star has sold millions of albums, won two Grammys and collaborated with some of the biggest names in pop: Stevie Wonder and John Mellencamp are just a few. But in the 2 1/2 years between the release of her last two albums, 2006's Testimony: Vol. 1, Life & Relationship and this year's Testimony: Vol. 2, Love & Politics, Arie had had it with the artistic alterations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matt Vensel | June 21, 2007
Critically acclaimed singer, songwriter and guitar player India.Arie performs her mixture of soul, R&B and hip-hop sounds at Rams Head Live tonight. The Grammy Award-winning artist's 2006 album, Testimony: Vol. 1, Life & Relationship, debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart. Doors open at 8 p.m. at Rams Head Live, 20 Market Place. Tickets are $35. Call 410-244-1131 or go to ramsheadlive.com.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | March 4, 2007
A 200-year-old white oak that sparked a statewide conservation effort in 1989 and led engineers to reroute an Annapolis thoroughfare will soon be turned into firewood. Split in half by an October windstorm, the tree remains visible to thousands of commuters every day on Aris. T. Allen Boulevard, where it has stood as a symbol for preservationists. But Jerry Blackwell, who owns the property now, said he will have what's left of the tree removed. He spent about $3,000 trying to preserve it with metal cords and chemicals to restrict its growth, hoping it wouldn't be weighed down.
NEWS
March 21, 1991
The Blue Angels Marching Band and American Legion Post 141 in Annapolis are sponsoring a benefit fashion show and dinner dance.Proceeds from the event will go to the band as well as a scholarship fund established in the name of the the late Annapolis delegate and civil rights advocate Aris T. Allen.The event will begin 7 p.m. Saturday, March 23, at the American Legion Post Hall on Forest Drive in Annapolis. A fashion show, light buffet and a dance will round out the nights agenda. Cost is $12 per person.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 18, 1992
BANGKOK, Thailand -- The husband of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese dissident who won the Nobel Peace Prize last year, said yesterday that her spirit is "indomitable" in her third year under house arrest and that she is prepared to remain in detention until there is reform in her country.Michael Aris, who left Myanmar on Saturday after his first reunion with his wife since a short visit in December 1989, said that Mrs. Aung San Suu Kyi had refused to discuss the military government's terms for her freedom.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | December 6, 2006
Two days ago, in First Mariner Bank's gorgeous boardroom overlooking the harbor, business leader after business leader urged Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley to reappoint Aris Melissaratos as economic development secretary. O'Malley wasn't there, but Ralph Tyler, head of O'Malley's transition team, was, according to participants. The meeting was officially about opening communication between companies and the next governor, but people kept talking about Melissaratos. O'Malley spokesman Rick Abbruzzese said yesterday that, while Melissaratos will be considered with other potential candidates, "it's unlikely that Secretary Melissaratos will be reappointed."
NEWS
September 5, 2006
On September 2, 2006, PRAXITELIS N.; dear husband of Barbara (nee Giannoupolis) Argyros, and devoted father of Louis P. and Nicholas and his wife Michelle Argyros; cherished grandfather of Telly, Barbara, Nicolette, and Aris Argyros, also survived by other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the family owned PAUL STELLA FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 7527 Harford Road (410) 444-4433 on Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Further viewing will be held in St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church on Wednesday from 10:30 to 11:00 A.M., the Funeral Hour.
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