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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2013
The head of aerospace technology firm ARINC and his wife have pledged at least $11 million to Anne Arundel Medical Center, the largest bequest ever to the hospital. John and Cathy Belcher of Edgewater will give the first $1 million to the hospital over the next several years.  At least $10 million will go to the hospital after the couple's death when their estate is liquidated. That amount could be higher depending on the value of the estate. The hospital will rename the Health Sciences Pavillion the “John and Cathy Belcher Pavillion," in honor of the couple's gift.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2013
The head of aerospace technology firm ARINC and his wife have pledged at least $11 million to Anne Arundel Medical Center, the largest bequest ever to the hospital. John and Cathy Belcher of Edgewater will give the first $1 million to the hospital over the next several years.  At least $10 million will go to the hospital after the couple's death when their estate is liquidated. That amount could be higher depending on the value of the estate. The hospital will rename the Health Sciences Pavillion the “John and Cathy Belcher Pavillion," in honor of the couple's gift.
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BUSINESS
March 12, 1997
ARINC Inc. of Annapolis has won a contract worth a potential $73.9 million to provide technical support to the Naval Air Warfare Center at Patuxent River.The one-year, $8 million contract has four years of options that greatly increase its potential value.ARINC, which designs and operates communications and information processing systems, will lead a team of smaller companies in the work.The job involves supporting aircraft testing activities consolidated at Patuxent River by the federal Base Realignment and Closure Commission.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | September 12, 2007
ARINC Inc., which has spent the past eight decades supplying airlines with communications technology, said yesterday that it plans to also fight "narcoterrorism" - the flow of illegal drugs that finance terrorists - as part of a Department of Defense contract worth up to $15 billion. The Annapolis company is one of five chosen from a pool of applicants to compete for jobs under the five-year contract, which was awarded by the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command. That agency supports the U.S. Department of Defense Counter-Narcoterrorism Technology Program Office.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | April 8, 2006
Annapolis-based ARINC Inc. said yesterday that it was seeking an infusion of capital to continue its growth in military, aviation and transportation communications technology. The company, founded in 1929, said it could not get the financing it needs from shareholders - primarily major airlines - so it was turning to private equity firms. Sale of the company is possible, a company spokeswoman said. "We really want to build on our double-digit growth momentum," said Linda Hartwig, the spokeswoman.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | July 6, 2007
ARINC, the Annapolis company that has been the primary provider of communications technology to the nation's airlines for nearly 80 years, announced yesterday that it is being sold to the Carlyle Group. The company, primarily owned by the six largest U.S. airlines, has been looking for an infusion of equity for the past year to finance technology development and rapid growth. Officials said yesterday that the giant private equity firm in Washington was just what ARINC was looking for. The deal will provide some needed cash for ARINC's airline owners and continue a monthlong buying spree for Carlyle that includes deals for General Motors' Allison Transmission unit and nursing home operator Manor Care Inc., as well as an offer to buy British telecom company Virgin Media.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | October 22, 1992
Ever wonder how airline pilots seem to know the weather in, say, Miami, even though you're cruising at 40,000 feet and Miami is still an hour away? Or how flight attendants know your connecting gate has just been changed -- even before you touch down?And what about connecting flights? Some remote destinations require multiple connections -- and multiple airlines -- to get there. With so many airlines, how do ticket agents know which seats are available on what flights and what they cost?The answer is in Annapolis, and it's called ARINC Inc.The privately held company was created in 1929 -- just 26 years after the Wright brothers' historic first flight -- by the nation's airline industry as the single licensee for radio communications.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | September 12, 2007
ARINC Inc., which has spent the past eight decades supplying airlines with communications technology, said yesterday that it plans to also fight "narcoterrorism" - the flow of illegal drugs that finance terrorists - as part of a Department of Defense contract worth up to $15 billion. The Annapolis company is one of five chosen from a pool of applicants to compete for jobs under the five-year contract, which was awarded by the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command. That agency supports the U.S. Department of Defense Counter-Narcoterrorism Technology Program Office.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2005
Anyone who's ever flown on a commercial plane knows the drill. As the plane approaches the airport, the pilot gets on the public address system. He or she typically tells a bad joke and then thanks everyone for flying the airline. Then he lists all the gates where passengers can meet connecting flights and gives a brief weather report. How does the pilot know all that - the gates, the weather, the status of the runway? The answer is that he communicates with crews on the ground. And those communications wouldn't be possible without ARINC, a privately held company based in Annapolis that handles 90 percent of the communication between pilots and the ground nationally and 70 percent worldwide.
NEWS
June 2, 2003
ARINC to build VHF transmitters for Air Force ARINC Inc. of Annapolis has been awarded an engineering contract to develop two remote VHF radio transmitters in central Alaska for the Air Force. The project will improve air-to-ground voice communications over two sections of the Air Force's 67,000-square-mile Pacific Alaskan Range Complex. Because of their remote location, the facilities will be powered by wind or solar energy. ARINC Inc., a transportation communications and systems engineering company, has more than 3,000 employees worldwide.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | July 6, 2007
ARINC, the Annapolis company that has been the primary provider of communications technology to the nation's airlines for nearly 80 years, announced yesterday that it is being sold to the Carlyle Group. The company, primarily owned by the six largest U.S. airlines, has been looking for an infusion of equity for the past year to finance technology development and rapid growth. Officials said yesterday that the giant private equity firm in Washington was just what ARINC was looking for. The deal will provide some needed cash for ARINC's airline owners and continue a monthlong buying spree for Carlyle that includes deals for General Motors' Allison Transmission unit and nursing home operator Manor Care Inc., as well as an offer to buy British telecom company Virgin Media.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | April 8, 2006
Annapolis-based ARINC Inc. said yesterday that it was seeking an infusion of capital to continue its growth in military, aviation and transportation communications technology. The company, founded in 1929, said it could not get the financing it needs from shareholders - primarily major airlines - so it was turning to private equity firms. Sale of the company is possible, a company spokeswoman said. "We really want to build on our double-digit growth momentum," said Linda Hartwig, the spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2005
Anyone who's ever flown on a commercial plane knows the drill. As the plane approaches the airport, the pilot gets on the public address system. He or she typically tells a bad joke and then thanks everyone for flying the airline. Then he lists all the gates where passengers can meet connecting flights and gives a brief weather report. How does the pilot know all that - the gates, the weather, the status of the runway? The answer is that he communicates with crews on the ground. And those communications wouldn't be possible without ARINC, a privately held company based in Annapolis that handles 90 percent of the communication between pilots and the ground nationally and 70 percent worldwide.
NEWS
June 2, 2003
ARINC to build VHF transmitters for Air Force ARINC Inc. of Annapolis has been awarded an engineering contract to develop two remote VHF radio transmitters in central Alaska for the Air Force. The project will improve air-to-ground voice communications over two sections of the Air Force's 67,000-square-mile Pacific Alaskan Range Complex. Because of their remote location, the facilities will be powered by wind or solar energy. ARINC Inc., a transportation communications and systems engineering company, has more than 3,000 employees worldwide.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1997
ARINC Inc. of Annapolis has won a contract worth a potential $73.9 million to provide technical support to the Naval Air Warfare Center at Patuxent River.The one-year, $8 million contract has four years of options that greatly increase its potential value.ARINC, which designs and operates communications and information processing systems, will lead a team of smaller companies in the work.The job involves supporting aircraft testing activities consolidated at Patuxent River by the federal Base Realignment and Closure Commission.
NEWS
March 13, 1995
Andrew T. HospodorARINC chairmanAndrew T. Hospodor, chairman and chief executive of ARINC, an Annapolis company that provides voice and data communications, systems engineering and integration services to the air transport industry, died Tuesday at Good Samaritan Hospital in Baltimore. He was 58.Family members said he had been suffering from a brain tumor.Before joining ARINC in 1987, he had been president and chief executive officer of RCA American Communications Inc.Mr. Hospodor received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Cornell University in 1960, a master's degree in mechanical engineering from Lehigh University in 1963 and another master's degree in business administration from Lehigh in 1967.
NEWS
March 13, 1995
Andrew T. HospodorARINC chairmanAndrew T. Hospodor, chairman and chief executive of ARINC, an Annapolis company that provides voice and data communications, systems engineering and integration services to the air transport industry, died Tuesday at Good Samaritan Hospital in Baltimore. He was 58.Family members said he had been suffering from a brain tumor.Before joining ARINC in 1987, he had been president and chief executive officer of RCA American Communications Inc.Mr. Hospodor received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Cornell University in 1960, a master's degree in mechanical engineering from Lehigh University in 1963 and another master's degree in business administration from Lehigh in 1967.
BUSINESS
By States News Service | June 10, 1991
Federal Contracts Report is a weekly summary of selected contracts recently awarded by the federal government to companies and other vendors in the Baltimore area.* Westinghouse Electric Corp. in Baltimore won a $27,561,005 contract from the Air Force to provide upgrade of Peace Marble II/III fire control radars for F-16's.* Westinghouse Electric Corp. in Baltimore won a $1,071,000 contract from the Air Force to provide ALQ-250 software development.* Westinghouse Electric Corp. in Baltimore won a $440,000 contract from the Air Force to provide engineering services applicable to AN/APY1/2, F-3A ACFT.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | October 22, 1992
Ever wonder how airline pilots seem to know the weather in, say, Miami, even though you're cruising at 40,000 feet and Miami is still an hour away? Or how flight attendants know your connecting gate has just been changed -- even before you touch down?And what about connecting flights? Some remote destinations require multiple connections -- and multiple airlines -- to get there. With so many airlines, how do ticket agents know which seats are available on what flights and what they cost?The answer is in Annapolis, and it's called ARINC Inc.The privately held company was created in 1929 -- just 26 years after the Wright brothers' historic first flight -- by the nation's airline industry as the single licensee for radio communications.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1992
Federal Contracts Report is a weekly summary of selected contracts awarded by the federal government to companies throughout Maryland.Defense contracts* Westinghouse Electric Corp. in Baltimore won a $3,213,678 contract from the Air Force to provide multichannel airborne radar measurements.* Tektronix Inc. in Gaithersburg won a $56,810 contract from the Defense Nuclear Agency to provide SCD-1000 transient digitizer with display.Non-defense contracts* EA Engineering Science and Technology in Hunt Valley won a $25,000,000 contract from the Air Force to provide environmental remediation action and to install chemical treatment systems for ground water cleanup at various locations in the United States and U.S. territories.
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