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Ariel Sharon

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NEWS
By Neve Gordon | August 29, 2002
JERUSALEM -- Israel recently agreed to withdraw its forces from Bethlehem and populated Palestinian areas in the Gaza Strip while the Palestinian Authority takes on the responsibility of policing residents there. Israeli soldiers and tanks moved to the outskirts of Bethlehem, allowing the residents who have been under curfew for nine weeks to leave their homes. But the tight military blockade around the city continues, cutting it off from other parts of the West Bank. Bethlehem has been transformed into an island.
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NEWS
January 20, 2014
Guy Ziv perceives an absence of strong leadership in current day Israel ("Sharon's style is missed," Jan. 16). He pines for the days of Ariel Sharon and criticizes current Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as being weak and irresolute. Mr. Ziv longingly reminisces about Sharon's decision to evacuate Jewish communities from Gaza and how this differentiates him from the current Israeli government. What the writer neglects to describe is what happened after Sharon's "bold" move.
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NEWS
By John Murphy, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
Ariel Sharon, the daring Israeli general who as a field commander and prime minister became one of the most influential and controversial leaders in the Middle East, died Saturday. He was 85. Sharon, who had been incapacitated since suffering a severe stroke in 2006, was moved in 2010 to his ranch in the Negev desert at the request of his family. In September he underwent abdominal surgery, but his condition worsened this month as his organs deteriorated. Sharon's death at a hospital near Tel Aviv was announced by his son Gilad.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
Maryland political and Jewish leaders reflected Saturday on the death of former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and said they found hope in the vision for peace in the Middle East that he outlined shortly before suffering a stroke in 2006. Sen. Ben Cardin extended his sympathies to Sharon's relatives, who have cared for the leader since he was incapacitated by a stroke. "For eight years, they have stood vigil as a great general fought the greatest battle of his life," Cardin said in a statement.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. will embark on the first overseas trip of his administration next week when he joins 27 state officials and Maryland business, medical and Jewish community leaders on a six-day trade mission to Israel. Ehrlich is scheduled to meet with Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom and other government officials, and will also announce cooperative projects involving electronic systems and marine biotechnology. Chief of staff Steven L. Kreseski and press secretary Greg Massoni will accompany the governor on the trip, which runs from Tuesday to Nov. 9 and will cost taxpayers $52,350 for airfare, hotel, security and other expenses for eight state and university system officials.
NEWS
By Mary Curtius and Mary Curtius,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 3, 2000
JERUSALEM - In Israel, they call him the Bulldozer. The name captures both the hulking physicality of soldier-politician Ariel Sharon and his philosophical outlook on the world. Through Israel's war-torn existence, Sharon has strode purposely into some of the nation's bloodiest and most contentious contacts with Arabs, emerging sometimes as a hero, sometimes in disgrace. He was the darling of Prime Ministers David Ben Gurion and Menachem Begin but undermined Begin's authority in 1982 during Israel's ill-fated invasion of Lebanon.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 9, 2001
The Secret Service can shoot to disable nonfatally. Police in Maryland don't do that. The only way to stop Kathleen would be for Bill to move here and run for governor, with Martin on his ticket. Ariel is a sprite, all light and spirit, symbol of creativity, imprisoned by a witch, freed by a magician. Ariel Sharon is not. Pity the two of five astronauts aboard the Atlantis who are not Baltimoreans, putting up with all that Ravenscrow.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and Janet Stobart and John Daniszewski and Janet Stobart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 5, 2005
LONDON - Mayor Ken Livingstone sparked anger from Israel yesterday for labeling Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon a "war criminal" less than a month after he drew criticism for comparing a Jewish reporter for a British newspaper to a concentration camp guard. Writing in the left-wing Guardian newspaper, Livingstone responded to criticism over the earlier remark, pointing to what he said was his long record of opposition to anti-Semitism. But then he launched a harsh attack on the "ethnic cleansing" policies of the Israeli government.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 23, 2004
JERUSALEM - Two Israeli Cabinet ministers said yesterday that Prime Minister Ariel Sharon would have to resign if a bribery investigation leads to his indictment. Sharon continued to dismiss any such possibility, declaring that he would serve "at least until 2007," when elections are scheduled. As the conflict with the Palestinians abruptly slipped to the sidelines of Israeli political debate, Israeli soldiers shot and killed a 12-year-old Palestinian boy playing near the boundary fence between the Gaza Strip and Israel, his family and hospital officials said.
NEWS
September 9, 2003
Sharon begins visit to India, a longtime ally of Palestinians NEW DELHI, India - Ariel Sharon began a landmark visit to India yesterday, intent on cementing defense deals and fortifying his country's friendship with a longtime Palestinian ally during the first visit here by an Israeli prime minister. Pakistan, India's neighbor and chief rival, immediately warned of the "dangerous consequences" of a military alliance between Israel and India, knowing that Sharon hopes to seal the $1 billion sale of an advanced airborne radar package.
NEWS
By John Murphy, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
Ariel Sharon, the daring Israeli general who as a field commander and prime minister became one of the most influential and controversial leaders in the Middle East, died Saturday. He was 85. Sharon, who had been incapacitated since suffering a severe stroke in 2006, was moved in 2010 to his ranch in the Negev desert at the request of his family. In September he underwent abdominal surgery, but his condition worsened this month as his organs deteriorated. Sharon's death at a hospital near Tel Aviv was announced by his son Gilad.
NEWS
By DIANA BLETTER | January 12, 2006
SHAVEI ZION, ISRAEL -- My youngest son, Ari, was sworn in last week as a soldier in the Israeli paratroopers at Jerusalem's Western Wall, the holiest site of the Jewish people. For the paratroopers, the wall is their proudest symbol: They were the soldiers who liberated it from Jordanian control during the 1967 Six-Day War. The ceremony Jan. 5 was especially moving because at that moment, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon lay in critical condition in a hospital on the other side of Jerusalem.
NEWS
By G. JEFFERSON PRICE III | January 10, 2006
My longtime colleague and friend, Trudy Rubin of The Philadelphia Inquirer, writes about the future of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict now that Prime Minister Ariel Sharon is unlikely to return to office even if he survives the massive stroke that felled him last week. Reading Ms. Rubin's column, which appeared in the Inquirer on Sunday and is printed below, I was reminded that we both started working in the Middle East in 1973. We both lived in Beirut. She was there on a fellowship; I had just arrived as The Sun's Middle East correspondent.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | December 1, 2005
JERUSALEM -- By almost every measure, Shimon Peres and Ariel Sharon make for a strange pairing. Prime Minister Sharon, 77, is a physically imposing retired general and farmer who has fought in every major Israeli war, led the country into a disastrous campaign in Lebanon and earned an international reputation as Israel's most hard-line leader. Peres, 82, is a slight Nobel Peace Prize winner who, despite a reputation as a loser in Israeli politics, has endeared himself to the West as one of Israel's doves.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 11, 2005
CRAWFORD, Texas - They have shared a helicopter ride over the West Bank and face-to-face meetings in Washington and Jordan. They have praised each other in public remarks in their native capitals. But President Bush has never taken Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon on his trademark pickup truck tour of his sprawling ranch here in the hills of central Texas. And by throwing open the doors of his beloved Prairie Chapel to Sharon today, Bush is marking a new phase in his close, high-stakes relationship with the Israeli leader.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and Janet Stobart and John Daniszewski and Janet Stobart,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 5, 2005
LONDON - Mayor Ken Livingstone sparked anger from Israel yesterday for labeling Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon a "war criminal" less than a month after he drew criticism for comparing a Jewish reporter for a British newspaper to a concentration camp guard. Writing in the left-wing Guardian newspaper, Livingstone responded to criticism over the earlier remark, pointing to what he said was his long record of opposition to anti-Semitism. But then he launched a harsh attack on the "ethnic cleansing" policies of the Israeli government.
NEWS
October 18, 2002
Cartoon offends by comparing Sharon, Hussein, KAL's Oct. 13 editorial cartoon was yet another example of biased and anti-Jewish feeling expressed by The Sun. It is deceitful to cast Prime Minister Ariel Sharon as a Saddam Hussein-style terrorist. And the cartoon makes fun of President Bush and the United States' relationship with its sole democratic ally in the Middle East, Israel. The Sun should realize that anger about this cartoon and other anti-Jewish or anti-Israel cartoons is widespread throughout the Jewish community of Maryland.
NEWS
August 10, 2003
FOR AN ISRAELI who opposed the land-for-peace deals of years past, Ariel Sharon is making his own way down the road toward a settlement with the Palestinians. For an Israeli leader who rejected the idea of erecting a security fence along Palestinian lands, the prime minister is building his way toward a physical separation of the two peoples. The former general whose military campaign on the West Bank led to the detention of thousands of Palestinians has now released hundreds of prisoners.
NEWS
September 7, 2004
AT AN "Ask President Bush" get-together in Nashua, N.H., last week (the sort of event not known for tough questioning), a young woman confronted the candidate about his support for Israel's prime minister: "How can Ariel Sharon be a man of peace, as you've said, if he causes death and torture among innocent Palestinians?" It was a twofer for Mr. Bush - a chance to reiterate his war on terrorism message and remind supporters of Israel how much he is on their side. "First of all, Ariel Sharon is defending his country against terrorist attacks, just like we will," Mr. Bush replied.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 14, 2004
JERUSALEM - Israel's senior army commander says that his country could safely withdraw from the Golan Heights in any future peace settlement with Syria, without retaining any occupied territory there as a buffer. Lt. Gen. Moshe Yaalon, the army chief of staff, broke with Israel's traditional position in an interview published yesterday with the newspaper Yediot Aharonot, saying: "From the point of view of military requirements, we could reach an agreement with Syria by giving up the Golan Heights.
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