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Ariadne

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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 10, 1994
The Washington Opera's current production of Richard Strauss' "Ariadne auf Naxos" is almost pure magic: beautiful sets, insightful direction, wizardly lighting and solid singing make it as good as anything you're likely to see on stage this season."
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By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
The Maryland/Israel Development Center sees itself as a matchmaker — not of a romantic kind but an economic one. For the past 19 years, the nonprofit group in Baltimore has been connecting Maryland companies with Israeli partners to promote trade and investments. Most recently, MIDC helped secure funding for two Maryland companies to do business with Israeli firms through the Israel-U.S. Binational Industrial Research and Development (BIRD) Foundation. Direct Dimensions is a 3-D imaging technology firm in Owings Mills and Ariadne is a biotech software company in Rockville.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 17, 2001
With a split screen, it's technically possible to watch two TV shows simultaneously. If those shows were, say, I Love Lucy and Dragnet, the resulting fusion would be more or less akin to what happens in Richard Strauss' opera Ariadne auf Naxos. If you added to the mix a little Monty Python's Flying Circus and South Park, you might get something akin to Peabody Opera Theatre's engaging production of Ariadne. Except that the music wouldn't be nearly as glorious. Even played straight, the opera has plenty of zaniness.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 19, 2008
If the Three Stooges stumbled into an oh-so-serious performance of Hamlet and carried on as usual alongside the uncomprehending actors, the result would be something akin to Ariadne auf Naxos, the musically and theatrically brilliant work by Richard Strauss that serves as an invigorating finale to Wolf Trap Opera's season. This company, devoted to the honing of emerging artists, routinely delivers smart, absorbing productions, among the most consistently satisfying to be found in the region.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 19, 2008
If the Three Stooges stumbled into an oh-so-serious performance of Hamlet and carried on as usual alongside the uncomprehending actors, the result would be something akin to Ariadne auf Naxos, the musically and theatrically brilliant work by Richard Strauss that serves as an invigorating finale to Wolf Trap Opera's season. This company, devoted to the honing of emerging artists, routinely delivers smart, absorbing productions, among the most consistently satisfying to be found in the region.
NEWS
February 10, 2004
On February 7, 2004 ROBERT EDWARD SHERIDAN of Catonsville; beloved husband of Susan Etta Bachus Sheridan; loving father of Brendan Stewart Sheridan and Ariadne Louise Sheridan. Also survived by many loving friends at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, APG, MD and at home. Family will receive friends on Thursday 1 to 2 P.M. at HARRY H. WITZKE'S FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4112 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City where a funeral service will be held at 2 P.M. Interment private.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | November 22, 1990
A first-class production of "Heartbreak House," George Bernard Shaw's biting, satirical commentary on the frivolous pursuits of the cultured, leisured classes of Great Britain and Europe before World War I, is being staged by Theatre Hopkins through Dec. 9.Clearly, the presentation of great classics, under the erudite direction of Suzanne Pratt, is what this tastefully artistic company does so well.At the time of Shaw's masterpiece, England was drifting through an economic, political and moral vacuum.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 18, 1997
It's rare to meet a soprano who's willing to admit to her age.Bridgett Hooks has no such qualms."You have to be [honest]," the 30-year-old soprano says. "Besides, I've been blessed with one opportunity after another."That may be because it's rarer still to find a soprano with her promise.The career of Hooks, who sings Strauss' "Four Last Songs" tonight at 8 and tomorrow at 3 p.m. with the Baltimore Symphony and guest conductor Paavo Berglund, appears to be going through the roof. Ever since she graduated from Philadelphia's Curtis Institute of Music five years ago, she's been the soprano that important conductors, including David Zinman, Robert Shaw, James Conlon and Herbert Blomstedt, invariably ask for when they perform huge choral works that demand a soprano with a creamy sound and considerable carrying power.
NEWS
February 14, 2004
Robert Edward Sheridan Jr., a member of the Army's Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense who established a neurophysiology laboratory at Aberdeen Proving Ground, died in his sleep of undetermined causes Feb. 7 at his Catonsville home. He was 53. Dr. Sheridan was born in Darby, Pa., and raised in Fort Collins, Colo. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1972 from Colorado State University and a master's degree and a doctorate in neurophysiology and biochemistry from the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
The Maryland/Israel Development Center sees itself as a matchmaker — not of a romantic kind but an economic one. For the past 19 years, the nonprofit group in Baltimore has been connecting Maryland companies with Israeli partners to promote trade and investments. Most recently, MIDC helped secure funding for two Maryland companies to do business with Israeli firms through the Israel-U.S. Binational Industrial Research and Development (BIRD) Foundation. Direct Dimensions is a 3-D imaging technology firm in Owings Mills and Ariadne is a biotech software company in Rockville.
NEWS
February 14, 2004
Robert Edward Sheridan Jr., a member of the Army's Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense who established a neurophysiology laboratory at Aberdeen Proving Ground, died in his sleep of undetermined causes Feb. 7 at his Catonsville home. He was 53. Dr. Sheridan was born in Darby, Pa., and raised in Fort Collins, Colo. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1972 from Colorado State University and a master's degree and a doctorate in neurophysiology and biochemistry from the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.
NEWS
February 10, 2004
On February 7, 2004 ROBERT EDWARD SHERIDAN of Catonsville; beloved husband of Susan Etta Bachus Sheridan; loving father of Brendan Stewart Sheridan and Ariadne Louise Sheridan. Also survived by many loving friends at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, APG, MD and at home. Family will receive friends on Thursday 1 to 2 P.M. at HARRY H. WITZKE'S FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4112 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City where a funeral service will be held at 2 P.M. Interment private.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 28, 2003
I'm going to miss all those bosoms. That was among the first thoughts that popped into my head yesterday when I heard the unsettling news that longtime, Baltimore-born opera director and costume designer John Lehmeyer had died on Monday of cancer at 63. I don't think he would have considered my reaction disrespectful; I'd like to think he'd be amused. There's no question that he will be widely remembered for a lot more than a penchant for squeezing female singers into the tightest, lowest-cut, just-short-of-explosive gowns and blouses that he could create.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 17, 2001
With a split screen, it's technically possible to watch two TV shows simultaneously. If those shows were, say, I Love Lucy and Dragnet, the resulting fusion would be more or less akin to what happens in Richard Strauss' opera Ariadne auf Naxos. If you added to the mix a little Monty Python's Flying Circus and South Park, you might get something akin to Peabody Opera Theatre's engaging production of Ariadne. Except that the music wouldn't be nearly as glorious. Even played straight, the opera has plenty of zaniness.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 18, 1997
It's rare to meet a soprano who's willing to admit to her age.Bridgett Hooks has no such qualms."You have to be [honest]," the 30-year-old soprano says. "Besides, I've been blessed with one opportunity after another."That may be because it's rarer still to find a soprano with her promise.The career of Hooks, who sings Strauss' "Four Last Songs" tonight at 8 and tomorrow at 3 p.m. with the Baltimore Symphony and guest conductor Paavo Berglund, appears to be going through the roof. Ever since she graduated from Philadelphia's Curtis Institute of Music five years ago, she's been the soprano that important conductors, including David Zinman, Robert Shaw, James Conlon and Herbert Blomstedt, invariably ask for when they perform huge choral works that demand a soprano with a creamy sound and considerable carrying power.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 10, 1994
The Washington Opera's current production of Richard Strauss' "Ariadne auf Naxos" is almost pure magic: beautiful sets, insightful direction, wizardly lighting and solid singing make it as good as anything you're likely to see on stage this season."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 28, 2003
I'm going to miss all those bosoms. That was among the first thoughts that popped into my head yesterday when I heard the unsettling news that longtime, Baltimore-born opera director and costume designer John Lehmeyer had died on Monday of cancer at 63. I don't think he would have considered my reaction disrespectful; I'd like to think he'd be amused. There's no question that he will be widely remembered for a lot more than a penchant for squeezing female singers into the tightest, lowest-cut, just-short-of-explosive gowns and blouses that he could create.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | November 15, 2001
`Ariadne' offers plenty of antics When it comes to musical and theatrical originality, Richard Strauss' Ariadne auf Naxos offers an abundance. The plot alone is a hoot. An opera company and a commedia dell'arte troupe are hired to provide pre-fireworks entertainment for a grand event, but time constraints force the two groups to perform simultaneously. The result is a delectably off-kilter mix of oh-so-serious opera characters and cavorting comedians, all enjoying some of Strauss' most ravishing, colorful melodies.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | November 22, 1990
A first-class production of "Heartbreak House," George Bernard Shaw's biting, satirical commentary on the frivolous pursuits of the cultured, leisured classes of Great Britain and Europe before World War I, is being staged by Theatre Hopkins through Dec. 9.Clearly, the presentation of great classics, under the erudite direction of Suzanne Pratt, is what this tastefully artistic company does so well.At the time of Shaw's masterpiece, England was drifting through an economic, political and moral vacuum.
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