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NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is keeping his re-election fund-raising machine churning, with a $4,000-a-couple dessert reception tonight at a private home in Montgomery County. The event at the Potomac home of party activist Michael Epstein could draw more than 200 people, said Ehrlich finance chairman John C. Reith, and is the governor's first such foray into the state's most populous county since his election. Former White House press secretary Ari Fleischer is the scheduled guest of honor.
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NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is keeping his re-election fund-raising machine churning, with a $4,000-a-couple dessert reception tonight at a private home in Montgomery County. The event at the Potomac home of party activist Michael Epstein could draw more than 200 people, said Ehrlich finance chairman John C. Reith, and is the governor's first such foray into the state's most populous county since his election. Former White House press secretary Ari Fleischer is the scheduled guest of honor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
Ari Fleischer's announcement this past week that he will resign as President Bush's press secretary was greeted by many media as an extraordinary event, unexpected and worthy of page-one news. But Martha Joynt Kumar, a political science professor at Towson University and scholar on the curious, often antagonistic, relationship between the White House and the press who cover it, says no press secretary can last for long, especially in an age of 24-hour cable news and instant analysis. Kumar has studied the art of presidential communications for years, and two years ago, she wrote the White House 2002 Project, a 600-page briefing book for the incoming administration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
Ari Fleischer's announcement this past week that he will resign as President Bush's press secretary was greeted by many media as an extraordinary event, unexpected and worthy of page-one news. But Martha Joynt Kumar, a political science professor at Towson University and scholar on the curious, often antagonistic, relationship between the White House and the press who cover it, says no press secretary can last for long, especially in an age of 24-hour cable news and instant analysis. Kumar has studied the art of presidential communications for years, and two years ago, she wrote the White House 2002 Project, a 600-page briefing book for the incoming administration.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - What a difference a few days make. Only last week, before the shooting started in earnest in Iraq, the White House was insisting its numbers-crunchers couldn't possibly give Congress an estimate of what the long-planned war would cost until it actually began. Ordinarily, the lawmakers could simply have examined President Bush's latest budget proposal for the figures. But, alas, the administration had included no provision either for fighting the war or for the huge costs for reconstruction of Iraq and Mr. Bush's optimistic vision of replacing Saddam Hussein's dictatorship with a functioning democracy.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - The chairman of Enron Corp. alerted the White House that the energy company was near collapse last fall, but Bush administration officials decided intervention was inappropriate, the White House said yesterday. Enron soon declared bankruptcy, swallowing millions of dollars in employee and stockholder money. President Bush faced a swirl of questions yesterday about the access that company executives enjoyed at the White House and about what senior administration officials did or did not do in the weeks before Enron's demise.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Ari Fleischer, the public face of the Bush White House during two tumultuous years that included the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and two wars, said yesterday that he would resign as President Bush's press secretary this summer to seek a job in the private sector. Fleischer's departure will clear the way for the White House to solidify its team for Bush's 2004 re-election campaign without unexpected changes as the election draws near. Aides said the president, who spoke with Fleischer about his departure Friday, has not settled on a replacement.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - Ari Fleischer learned about the power he wields as White House press secretary - the hard way. Just four days into the job, with a phalanx of reporters furiously scribbling notes, Fleischer announced that President Bush's Cabinet nominees were assured Senate confirmation, even though several, including his controversial choice for attorney general, had not yet come up for a vote. Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle, Fleischer relayed, had said so in a meeting with Bush earlier that day. The next day, Daschle's office said the senator's words had been mischaracterized.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 2001
WASHINGTON - There's plenty of awful news flowing from the White House these days. The nation is in "an energy crisis." The economy is "sputtering." So says President Bush, almost daily, before adding that he knows just the solutions. They happen to be part of his domestic agenda. The answer to the nation's energy woes? Boost domestic energy supplies - for example, open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska to oil drilling. The prescription for a sliding economy? A $1.6 trillion tax cut. The president's alarmist words come even as experts question the severity of the nation's energy problems and point to some positive signs that the economy, while clearly slowing, is not sinking into serious recession, despite the 13.5 percent plunge in the Dow Jones industrial average over the past 10 trading sessions.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 10, 2013
The revelation that the federal government has spied on millions of supposedly private phone and Internet communications makes President Barack Obama's headache over the IRS targeting of conservative groups seeking tax exemptions seem like a passing migraine. The leaks about the policy to the British newspaper the Guardian and to the Washington Post, provided in convincing detail, cast a president who claims to be a champion of individual privacy and a free press as just another hypocritical politician bending to intelligence-gathering mission creep.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Ari Fleischer, the public face of the Bush White House during two tumultuous years that included the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and two wars, said yesterday that he would resign as President Bush's press secretary this summer to seek a job in the private sector. Fleischer's departure will clear the way for the White House to solidify its team for Bush's 2004 re-election campaign without unexpected changes as the election draws near. Aides said the president, who spoke with Fleischer about his departure Friday, has not settled on a replacement.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - What a difference a few days make. Only last week, before the shooting started in earnest in Iraq, the White House was insisting its numbers-crunchers couldn't possibly give Congress an estimate of what the long-planned war would cost until it actually began. Ordinarily, the lawmakers could simply have examined President Bush's latest budget proposal for the figures. But, alas, the administration had included no provision either for fighting the war or for the huge costs for reconstruction of Iraq and Mr. Bush's optimistic vision of replacing Saddam Hussein's dictatorship with a functioning democracy.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - The chairman of Enron Corp. alerted the White House that the energy company was near collapse last fall, but Bush administration officials decided intervention was inappropriate, the White House said yesterday. Enron soon declared bankruptcy, swallowing millions of dollars in employee and stockholder money. President Bush faced a swirl of questions yesterday about the access that company executives enjoyed at the White House and about what senior administration officials did or did not do in the weeks before Enron's demise.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 2001
WASHINGTON - There's plenty of awful news flowing from the White House these days. The nation is in "an energy crisis." The economy is "sputtering." So says President Bush, almost daily, before adding that he knows just the solutions. They happen to be part of his domestic agenda. The answer to the nation's energy woes? Boost domestic energy supplies - for example, open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska to oil drilling. The prescription for a sliding economy? A $1.6 trillion tax cut. The president's alarmist words come even as experts question the severity of the nation's energy problems and point to some positive signs that the economy, while clearly slowing, is not sinking into serious recession, despite the 13.5 percent plunge in the Dow Jones industrial average over the past 10 trading sessions.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - Ari Fleischer learned about the power he wields as White House press secretary - the hard way. Just four days into the job, with a phalanx of reporters furiously scribbling notes, Fleischer announced that President Bush's Cabinet nominees were assured Senate confirmation, even though several, including his controversial choice for attorney general, had not yet come up for a vote. Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle, Fleischer relayed, had said so in a meeting with Bush earlier that day. The next day, Daschle's office said the senator's words had been mischaracterized.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | April 2, 2014
America is not yet an oligarchy, but that's where Charles and David Koch and a few other billionaires are taking us. American democracy used to depend on political parties that more or less represented most of us. Political scientists of the 1950s and 1960s marveled at American "pluralism," by which they meant the capacities of parties and other membership groups to reflect the preferences of the vast majority of citizens. Then around a quarter century ago, as income and wealth began concentrating at the top, the Republican and Democratic parties started to morph into mechanisms for extracting money, mostly from wealthy people.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
The Etch-a-Sketch gaffe by Mitt Romney's aide -- that played out here in Maryland during the candidate's visit Wednesday -- has added some fun and sparkle to a race that needed a good prop. Newt Gingrich waved around one of the classic kids toys during a campaign stop in Louisiana. Time magazine called it "Mitt Romney's Etch-a-Disaster. The oops happened on CNN. Romney aide Eric Fehrnstrom said, asked if his candidates positions in the primary might be too far to the right to win in November, replied: “Well, I think you hit a reset button for the fall campaign.
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