Advertisement
HomeCollectionsArena Stage
IN THE NEWS

Arena Stage

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
About 2000 years ago, the Roman poet Ovid completed “Metamorphoses,” his chronicle of ancient gods and goddesses, the mortals who worshiped or dared them, and the transformations they experienced. In this epic work, Ovid delivered a simple, comforting message: “All things change, but nothing dies.” In the late 1990s, playwright and director Mary Zimmerman unveiled a compelling treatment of Ovid's magnum opus, also titled “Metamorphoses,” which went on to become one of her most admired and performed creations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Tana Hicken, a Baltimore actress and teacher who deftly portrayed a wide variety of characters on stage during a professional career that spanned more than four decades, died Aug. 17 at her home in Sparks of myositis, an autoimmune disorder. She was 70. "I think she was the finest stage actress I've ever witnessed in my life. She was just riveting," said Vince Lancisi, founder of Everyman Theatre , who first saw Ms. Hicken at Washington's Arena Stage when he was a student at the Catholic University of America.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | April 3, 2014
If great theater is your thing, Arena Stage is the place to be. The Southwest Washington, D.C., theater has been on a roll this season, with exceptional plays that covered a broad range of subjects, featuring well-known cast members. I've always felt that Arena Stage's productions have reflected the diversity of the nation's capital and this season has been no exception. I haven't seen the entire lineup, but many this season fall in that category, such as the by-popular-demand repeat performance of the explosive "One Night With Janis Joplin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
It has been said that the United States has never really stopped fighting its Civil War. A glance at any current news source will suggest that we may never be finished with the post-9/11 conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, either. All of which makes "Healing Wars," the thoroughly original theatrical work conceived and directed by Liz Lerman, all the more timely and important. Commissioned by George Washington University and given its premiere by Arena Stage, this engrossing fusion of drama and dance (some music, too)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
Tragedy seemed to stalk Mary Todd Lincoln as surely as it did her husband. Long before that Good Friday in 1865 when the Lincolns decided to attend Ford's Theatre, it was clear that the mental health of the president's wife had begun to fray. To this day, she is a riveting figure. There's something of a Shakespearean dimension about her personality and her life, which, post-Washington, included stints in a mental asylum. No wonder she dominates the uneven, but intriguing, new play by Tazewell Thompson, although the first lady gets only half the title.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
For 60 years, Arena Stage has played a substantial role in Washington's cultural life. That role is sure to be bigger than ever after a multi-year, $135 million renovation that provides the nationally respected nonprofit theater with a greatly enhanced facility down by the Potomac. The transformation, designed by Canadian architect Bing Thom, is quite the eye-catcher. The original 1960s-era theaters have been gently tweaked, and a small studio space had been added. The entire complex — now officially designated Arena Stage at the Mead Center for American Theater (named for major donors)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
If you haven't yet felt pity for Secretary of State John Kerry, you will after seeing "Camp David," the new play by Lawrence Wright at Arena Stage about the most famous attempt to broker peace in the Middle East. Every issue that has frustrated Kerry lately in his heroic bid to get the parties moving toward a solution -- settlements, Palestinian rights, etc. -- dogged President Jimmy Carter when he enticed President Anwar Sadat and Prime Minister Menachem Begin to Camp David in September 1978 to hash out some sort of agreement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 3, 2002
Arena Stage continues its season with a new British translation of a 17th-century French comedy, directed and designed by veterans of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. The play is Moliere's The Misanthrope; the translator is Ranjit Bolt, whose work has been seen at London's Old Vic as well as the Royal National Theatre and Royal Shakespeare Company; the director is Penny Metropulos, associate artistic director at the Oregon company; and the designers are William Bloodgood and Deborah Dryden, Oregon's resident scenic designer and costume designer, respectively.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Eric Coble's dark-funny play "The Velocity of Autumn," a popular and critical success at Arena Stage in a potent production starring Estelle Parsons and directed by Molly Smith back in the fall, is heading to Broadway next April. The staging will mark the Broadway debuts of Coble and Smith, Arena's artistic director.  It's the 20th Arena staging to get a Broadway showing in the D.C. company's 63 years. "Velocity" will start previews April 1 at the Booth Theatre and open April 21 for what its being called a limited engagement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
It has been said that the United States has never really stopped fighting its Civil War. A glance at any current news source will suggest that we may never be finished with the post-9/11 conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, either. All of which makes "Healing Wars," the thoroughly original theatrical work conceived and directed by Liz Lerman, all the more timely and important. Commissioned by George Washington University and given its premiere by Arena Stage, this engrossing fusion of drama and dance (some music, too)
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | May 13, 2014
Dressed in skinny jeans, flats, a white shirt and still wearing her stage makeup, the petite Ashley Blair Fitzgerald sits cross-legged in a small conference room after her matinee performance in "Smokey Joe's Cafe" at Arena Stage in Washington. The show is the Ellicott City native's debut performance at the southwest D.C. theater and Fitzgerald said she's enjoying being a part of the production. "I'm having a blast and the cast is amazing," Fitzgerald said. "I'm so blessed to be performing with these talented people in this great environment where I can grow as a performer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
If you haven't yet felt pity for Secretary of State John Kerry, you will after seeing "Camp David," the new play by Lawrence Wright at Arena Stage about the most famous attempt to broker peace in the Middle East. Every issue that has frustrated Kerry lately in his heroic bid to get the parties moving toward a solution -- settlements, Palestinian rights, etc. -- dogged President Jimmy Carter when he enticed President Anwar Sadat and Prime Minister Menachem Begin to Camp David in September 1978 to hash out some sort of agreement.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | April 3, 2014
If great theater is your thing, Arena Stage is the place to be. The Southwest Washington, D.C., theater has been on a roll this season, with exceptional plays that covered a broad range of subjects, featuring well-known cast members. I've always felt that Arena Stage's productions have reflected the diversity of the nation's capital and this season has been no exception. I haven't seen the entire lineup, but many this season fall in that category, such as the by-popular-demand repeat performance of the explosive "One Night With Janis Joplin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
The theater scene in Washington during this frigid winter has been pretty hot. The latest example is "Mother Courage and Her Children," the classic Bertolt Brecht play in a potent revival at Arena Stage starring Kathleen Turner. Director Molly Smith, who guides this atmospheric, in-the-round production with a sure hand, has said she wanted to remind people of the "Her Children" in the title so that Brecht's searing anti-war, anti-hypocrisy sentiments are not the only take-homes. That goal has been realized, thanks to Turner's rich portrayal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Some voices are so unmistakable, so incredibly distinctive that they seem to burn into your memory, even your soul. You don't have to hear such a voice in person; a recording, however old and worn, will do the trick. That's how I fell under the spell of so many great singers from the past. Ponselle. Callas. Bjorling. And Paul Robeson, the subject of "The Tallest Tree in the Forest," a fascinating play written and performed by Daniel Beaty at Arena Stage in a sterling production directed by Moises Kaufman.  With Robeson, of course, you are dealing with much, much more than a deep, enveloping, bottomless tone and vividly communicative phrasing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
The eternally vexing issue of race in America has been examined and dissected in so many ways by now that it's hard to say something new. So it's all the more surprising that a playwright should have managed to generate a fresh take on this subject out of dated material - the 1967 film “Guess Who's Coming to Dinner.” Todd Kreidler re-examined the screenplay by William Rose and transformed it into a sturdy theatrical vehicle, as sobering as...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
The theater scene in Washington during this frigid winter has been pretty hot. The latest example is "Mother Courage and Her Children," the classic Bertolt Brecht play in a potent revival at Arena Stage starring Kathleen Turner. Director Molly Smith, who guides this atmospheric, in-the-round production with a sure hand, has said she wanted to remind people of the "Her Children" in the title so that Brecht's searing anti-war, anti-hypocrisy sentiments are not the only take-homes. That goal has been realized, thanks to Turner's rich portrayal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
The eternally vexing issue of race in America has been examined and dissected in so many ways by now that it's hard to say something new. So it's all the more surprising that a playwright should have managed to generate a fresh take on this subject out of dated material - the 1967 film “Guess Who's Coming to Dinner.” Todd Kreidler re-examined the screenplay by William Rose and transformed it into a sturdy theatrical vehicle, as sobering as...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Eric Coble's dark-funny play "The Velocity of Autumn," a popular and critical success at Arena Stage in a potent production starring Estelle Parsons and directed by Molly Smith back in the fall, is heading to Broadway next April. The staging will mark the Broadway debuts of Coble and Smith, Arena's artistic director.  It's the 20th Arena staging to get a Broadway showing in the D.C. company's 63 years. "Velocity" will start previews April 1 at the Booth Theatre and open April 21 for what its being called a limited engagement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Alexandra, who has been feeling all of her 79 years, sits in her Brooklyn brownstone surrounded by bottles filled with flammable liquid. She keeps a Zippo lighter ever at the ready.  No one, but no one, is going to get her out of her home. Yes, she knows that she is, well -- "Dwindling. That's the word I settled on," she says. So all she wants is to finish out her days with "a little touch of grace. " As portrayed by venerable actress Estelle Parsons in Eric Coble's funny-bittersweet new play "The Velocity of Autumn" at Arena Stage, Alexandra is a startling force -- wry, wise, wistful, obsessive, compulsive, angry, a little spiteful.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.