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NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | November 1, 2007
Kenai Santos was seated in the back of a pickup truck, being driven home from a shopping trip by an older female friend, when, she said, she saw a woman appear in the truck's path. The driver of the truck, Lazara Arellano de Hogue, honked her horn but continued driving, Santos testified yesterday in court, and the woman in the street appeared to have been struck. "I saw her falling sideways," Santos said in Spanish through a translator. Moments later, the truck turned onto a side street and Arellano de Hogue removed a stroller that was jammed underneath the truck, Santos said.
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NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2007
Wiping tears from her eyes, Lazara Arellano de Hogue apologized yesterday and begged for forgiveness from the parents of a child who was dragged to death beneath her pickup truck nearly a year ago. "From the first time I was told what happened, it has hurt me a lot because it's like he was a child of my own," the woman said through a Spanish-speaking interpreter at her sentencing hearing. "I want to go to the cemetery - to go on my knees to the grave to ask the child to forgive me." Relatives of 3-year-old Elijah Cozart expressed outrage at the request.
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NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Julie Scharper and Gadi Dechter and Julie Scharper,Sun reporters | December 3, 2006
The Anneslie woman charged yesterday in the hit-and-run death of a toddler thought that she had only struck his grandmother and did not know that the 3-year-old was caught beneath her truck, her boyfriend said. Elijah Cozart was struck Friday afternoon as his grandmother, 55-year-old Marjorie Thomas of Hamilton, was pushing him across Goucher Boulevard near the boy's Glenmont home. He was discovered later by witnesses nearly a mile away on a Loch Hill sidewalk. His grandmother was listed in serious condition yesterday at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | November 2, 2007
A woman accused of crashing into a grandmother pushing her grandson in a stroller and then driving off, dragging the toddler for nearly a mile, told police that she knew she had struck something but didn't realize there had been a child in the stroller, a police officer testified yesterday. Lazara de Arellano de Hogue told police that as she was driving her pickup truck down Goucher Boulevard she saw a woman with a stroller dart into the road and then she "hit something, but she didn't know what it was," Baltimore County Officer Manuel Rios testified.
FEATURES
November 1, 1991
You can view the AIDS quilt panels in the Glass Pavilion of Johns Hopkins University from noon to 8 p.m. Nov. 4 and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Nov. 5-11. The opening ceremonies at noon on Monday will include a reading of names of people memorialized in the quilt.Other special events: Staged readings of Andy Kirby's "Compromised Immunity," "Laughing Wild" by Christopher Durang and "On Tidy Endings" by Harvey Fierstein at 8 p.m. Nov. 4 in the Arellano Theater in Levering Hall; a screening of the Academy Award-winning "Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt" at 8 p.m. Nov. 7 in the Arellano Theater; a workshop on"Surviving AIDS" by Michael Callen at 3 p.m. Nov. 10 in the rTC Arellano Theater.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun Reporter | December 5, 2006
Lazara Arellano de Hogue pressed her hands to her lips in a prayerful gesture. She wept softly and appeared distraught as she told a Baltimore County judge that she felt "really bad" and that she hadn't eaten or slept since being arrested in a hit-and-run accident that left a toddler dead and his grandmother seriously injured. "I'm thinking about my kids," the 40-year-old woman said through a Spanish-speaking interpreter at her bail review hearing yesterday in District Court in Towson - her first public comments since Friday's fatal accident.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2007
Wiping tears from her eyes, Lazara Arellano de Hogue apologized yesterday and begged for forgiveness from the parents of a child who was dragged to death beneath her pickup truck nearly a year ago. "From the first time I was told what happened, it has hurt me a lot because it's like he was a child of my own," the woman said through a Spanish-speaking interpreter at her sentencing hearing. "I want to go to the cemetery - to go on my knees to the grave to ask the child to forgive me." Relatives of 3-year-old Elijah Cozart expressed outrage at the request.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | December 4, 2006
A bail hearing is scheduled today for the woman charged in the hit-and-run dragging death of a toddler whose stroller was struck at a Towson intersection and caught under the pickup truck she was driving. Lazara Arellano de Hogue, 40, could face a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison and a $5,000 fine if convicted of leaving the scene of a fatal accident, attorneys familiar with such cases said yesterday. Police said earlier that other charges might be lodged in connection with the incident.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | November 2, 2007
A woman accused of crashing into a grandmother pushing her grandson in a stroller and then driving off, dragging the toddler for nearly a mile, told police that she knew she had struck something but didn't realize there had been a child in the stroller, a police officer testified yesterday. Lazara de Arellano de Hogue told police that as she was driving her pickup truck down Goucher Boulevard she saw a woman with a stroller dart into the road and then she "hit something, but she didn't know what it was," Baltimore County Officer Manuel Rios testified.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
A Baltimore County judge ruled yesterday that the statements to police by a 41-year-old woman charged in the December dragging death of a toddler whose stroller was caught under the woman's truck can be presented at trial as evidence. Defense attorneys for Lazara Arellano de Hogue had argued that the statements should not be allowed, in part, because police had failed to properly translate from English to Spanish the woman's rights to remain silent and have a lawyer present during questioning.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | November 1, 2007
Kenai Santos was seated in the back of a pickup truck, being driven home from a shopping trip by an older female friend, when, she said, she saw a woman appear in the truck's path. The driver of the truck, Lazara Arellano de Hogue, honked her horn but continued driving, Santos testified yesterday in court, and the woman in the street appeared to have been struck. "I saw her falling sideways," Santos said in Spanish through a translator. Moments later, the truck turned onto a side street and Arellano de Hogue removed a stroller that was jammed underneath the truck, Santos said.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | October 30, 2007
Crystal Douglass was on her way home one afternoon last December when a red truck pulled up beside her at a stoplight on Loch Raven Boulevard in the Towson area. Looking more closely, the Baltimore woman saw a stroller lodged beneath the truck. Strapped into the stroller was a little boy. "I pointed and shouted, `You have a baby under that stroller,'" Douglass testified yesterday at the trial of the woman charged in the dragging death of the toddler in the carriage. "She never paid me any attention."
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
A Baltimore County judge ruled yesterday that the statements to police by a 41-year-old woman charged in the December dragging death of a toddler whose stroller was caught under the woman's truck can be presented at trial as evidence. Defense attorneys for Lazara Arellano de Hogue had argued that the statements should not be allowed, in part, because police had failed to properly translate from English to Spanish the woman's rights to remain silent and have a lawyer present during questioning.
NEWS
January 17, 2007
Charges are added in boy's dragging death A 41-year-old woman charged last month in the dragging death of a toddler whose stroller was caught under her truck was indicted yesterday on the more serious charge of auto manslaughter, a Baltimore County prosecutor said. Lazara Arellano de Hogue was charged with two counts of vehicular manslaughter and two felony counts of failing to stop her vehicle at the scene of a fatal accident. The county grand jury also indicted the woman on charges of failing to render aid, negligent and reckless driving, and failing to avoid a collision with a pedestrian.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun Reporter | December 5, 2006
Lazara Arellano de Hogue pressed her hands to her lips in a prayerful gesture. She wept softly and appeared distraught as she told a Baltimore County judge that she felt "really bad" and that she hadn't eaten or slept since being arrested in a hit-and-run accident that left a toddler dead and his grandmother seriously injured. "I'm thinking about my kids," the 40-year-old woman said through a Spanish-speaking interpreter at her bail review hearing yesterday in District Court in Towson - her first public comments since Friday's fatal accident.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | December 4, 2006
A bail hearing is scheduled today for the woman charged in the hit-and-run dragging death of a toddler whose stroller was struck at a Towson intersection and caught under the pickup truck she was driving. Lazara Arellano de Hogue, 40, could face a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison and a $5,000 fine if convicted of leaving the scene of a fatal accident, attorneys familiar with such cases said yesterday. Police said earlier that other charges might be lodged in connection with the incident.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | October 30, 2007
Crystal Douglass was on her way home one afternoon last December when a red truck pulled up beside her at a stoplight on Loch Raven Boulevard in the Towson area. Looking more closely, the Baltimore woman saw a stroller lodged beneath the truck. Strapped into the stroller was a little boy. "I pointed and shouted, `You have a baby under that stroller,'" Douglass testified yesterday at the trial of the woman charged in the dragging death of the toddler in the carriage. "She never paid me any attention."
NEWS
By Andrew Martin and Andrew Martin,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 10, 2004
COVERT, Mich. - Armando Arellano had never heard of a blueberry when he jumped into the trunk of a car 21 years ago, and was crammed between two strangers for a successful - and illegal - drive across the border from Mexico into the United States. Nor did he give blueberries much thought during the next two decades, whipping up cakes, pies and an occasional blueberry muffin as a baker in California and more recently, in Elk Grove Village, Ill. But on a recent afternoon, standing amid cartons of blueberries, pinatas and Mexican candies in the newly refurbished Arellanos Fresh Fruit Market, Arellano credited blueberries for making possible an unexpected and happy twist in his life.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Julie Scharper and Gadi Dechter and Julie Scharper,Sun reporters | December 3, 2006
The Anneslie woman charged yesterday in the hit-and-run death of a toddler thought that she had only struck his grandmother and did not know that the 3-year-old was caught beneath her truck, her boyfriend said. Elijah Cozart was struck Friday afternoon as his grandmother, 55-year-old Marjorie Thomas of Hamilton, was pushing him across Goucher Boulevard near the boy's Glenmont home. He was discovered later by witnesses nearly a mile away on a Loch Hill sidewalk. His grandmother was listed in serious condition yesterday at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By Andrew Martin and Andrew Martin,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 10, 2004
COVERT, Mich. - Armando Arellano had never heard of a blueberry when he jumped into the trunk of a car 21 years ago, and was crammed between two strangers for a successful - and illegal - drive across the border from Mexico into the United States. Nor did he give blueberries much thought during the next two decades, whipping up cakes, pies and an occasional blueberry muffin as a baker in California and more recently, in Elk Grove Village, Ill. But on a recent afternoon, standing amid cartons of blueberries, pinatas and Mexican candies in the newly refurbished Arellanos Fresh Fruit Market, Arellano credited blueberries for making possible an unexpected and happy twist in his life.
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