Advertisement
HomeCollectionsArea Commission
IN THE NEWS

Area Commission

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
The state's Critical Area Commission yesterday cleared an environmental hurdle to an African-American history museum's proposed addition in Annapolis, but opponents immediately vowed to appeal. The commission found proposed environmental controls met state standards. Because the planned $5.5 million addition to the Banneker-Douglass Museum is considered a state project, the project did not need to meet the Annapolis city standards that would apply to a project on privately owned land. "We are looking forward to starting construction soon on the addition," said J. Rodney Little, director of the Maryland Historical Trust.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2008
In October 2006, the Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Commission did something extraordinary. Its members voted to deny a town the right to reclassify a large tract of waterfront from a protected "resource conservation area" to a designation that allows intensive development. Such a refusal had never happened before - a sad commentary on the commission's relative impotence under existing law. At issue was a $1 billion golf resort near Dorchester County's Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge.
Advertisement
NEWS
By CHRIS GUY AND TOM PELTON and CHRIS GUY AND TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTERS | August 22, 2006
CAMBRIDGE -- Plans for a billion-dollar golf resort community that has drawn protests from environmentalists won approval yesterday evening from the Cambridge City Council. The 2,700-home Blackwater Resort project - which opponents view as sprawl that would endanger the nearby Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge - now must receive approval from a state commission appointed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. that reviews construction within 1,000 feet of Chesapeake Bay tributaries. Supporters hope the construction on top of wetlands and farm fields will bring thousands of new residents - and millions in tax dollars - to a city of about 11,000 that has lost population since the 1960s.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | March 7, 2008
The O'Malley administration's effort to tighten shoreline development restrictions gained political momentum yesterday, as local officials announced their support for the bill after winning key concessions. But the compromise worried environmental advocates, who said they hope the legislation will still be sufficient to ensure that the 24-year-old Critical Area law can better protect the Chesapeake Bay from development. Developers also continued to object to the proposed rules, saying they go too far. Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr., president of the Maryland Association of Counties, joined administration officials at a hearing before the House Environmental Matters Committee yesterday to declare the support of his politically potent group for the compromise.
NEWS
March 15, 1992
Three Harford residents and a Harford public high school ecology club were honored at the Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Commission meetingrecently conducted in Havre de Grace.Honored were James Bailey, manager of the Aberdeen Proving Ground wetlands program; Steve Wampler, APG's manager for Chesapeake Bay initiatives; and Tom Trafton, a faculty adviser at Havre de Grace High School.The Havre de Grace High School's ecology club, led by Trafton, also was honored for tree-planting, stream and shore cleanups, and recycling activities.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | April 17, 1992
County Executive Robert R. Neall has been asked to impose a moratorium on some waterfront development until a state panel can complete its review of the county's critical area law next fall.A March 4 report issued by the state Critical Area Commission's staff says the county's law is too lenient with developments proposed before the law went into effect in 1988. And that leniency is wreaking environmental havoc on the Magothy, South and West rivers, say three residents who live on the waterways and have proposed the moratorium.
NEWS
March 17, 2008
In October 2006, the Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Commission did something extraordinary. Its members voted to deny a town the right to reclassify a large tract of waterfront from a protected "resource conservation area" to a designation that allows intensive development. Such a refusal had never happened before - a sad commentary on the commission's relative impotence under existing law. At issue was a $1 billion golf resort near Dorchester County's Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1995
Property owners who want to build on their vacant waterfront lots could escape the long and costly variance process if the County Council approves a plan being developed by county planners.Anne Arundel County officials want to create an internal review for building in waterfront communities established before the 1986 Critical Area Law, said Joseph Elbrich, the county's environmental administrator. He said he did not know how many parcels would be affected.The standards established for building on those lots would provide a "more streamlined" review than the current variance process does, said Sarah Taylor Rogers, director of the Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Commission.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | July 11, 1993
Anne Arundel County has eased a month-old moratorium on && waterfront construction projects, allowing them to move forward under new, stricter environmental rules.County planners issued 10 of 188 grading permits stalled by the moratorium almost immediately after the Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Commission narrowed its criticism Wednesday of the county's shoreline protection program, said Frank Ward, director of the county Permit Application Center.Another 20 permits could be issued as soon as the applicants set aside money guaranteeing compliance with environmental and engineering standards, he said.
NEWS
March 2, 2008
To understand why Maryland's Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Law is not working particularly well, one need look no further than to the Queen Anne's County couple who wanted to build a parking garage on their waterfront lot. Last month, an Eastern Shore judge denied the couple the variance they needed to build it - but only after a yearlong debacle that easily could have been avoided. What's so bad about a three-car garage? By itself, not all that much. But the problem is that the more impervious surface created near the bay and its tributaries, the more harmful runoff pours into the water.
NEWS
March 2, 2008
To understand why Maryland's Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Law is not working particularly well, one need look no further than to the Queen Anne's County couple who wanted to build a parking garage on their waterfront lot. Last month, an Eastern Shore judge denied the couple the variance they needed to build it - but only after a yearlong debacle that easily could have been avoided. What's so bad about a three-car garage? By itself, not all that much. But the problem is that the more impervious surface created near the bay and its tributaries, the more harmful runoff pours into the water.
NEWS
January 8, 2008
When the Chesapeake Bay Critical Area law was passed by the General Assembly, it was considered the bold centerpiece to Gov. Harry R. Hughes' effort to restore the nation's largest estuary. Land-use issues had long been treated as the sole province of local government. For the first time, the state would have a say on how land within 1,000 feet of the water's edge would be used. But 24 years later, it's clear that the statute needs to be updated. Too often, the goals of the law have been ignored and the 29-member panel charged with overseeing it, the Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Commission, has lacked the necessary authority.
NEWS
October 8, 2006
Commission finally acts to protect bay The Sun's article about the Critical Area Commission's blocking the golf resort proposal near Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge warmed my heart ("Shore resort is blocked," Oct. 5). Twenty-some years ago, I was a member of the Environmental Matters Committee of the House of Delegates and worked with my committee member colleagues, Gov. Harry S. Hughes, state House Speaker Benjamin L. Cardin and committee Chairman Larry Young to pass the most far-reaching environmental legislation of that time.
NEWS
September 30, 2006
Blackwater Resort a big threat to bay Before the state's Critical Area Commission is a request to grant one of the largest growth allocations ever sought in Maryland. And the commission's decision regarding the proposed Blackwater Resort development near Cambridge will have a lasting impact on the future of development in Maryland and the health of the bay ("Bay group unveils plan of action," Sept. 20). Time and time again, we have found this to be true: How we use our land has everything to do with how healthy our water and its related habitat can be. This is especially true when a developer proposes a 2,700-home mega-development just upstream from a federal wildlife refuge.
NEWS
By CHRIS GUY AND TOM PELTON and CHRIS GUY AND TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTERS | August 22, 2006
CAMBRIDGE -- Plans for a billion-dollar golf resort community that has drawn protests from environmentalists won approval yesterday evening from the Cambridge City Council. The 2,700-home Blackwater Resort project - which opponents view as sprawl that would endanger the nearby Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge - now must receive approval from a state commission appointed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. that reviews construction within 1,000 feet of Chesapeake Bay tributaries. Supporters hope the construction on top of wetlands and farm fields will bring thousands of new residents - and millions in tax dollars - to a city of about 11,000 that has lost population since the 1960s.
TOPIC
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2005
QUEENSTOWN - Red-winged blackbirds flit among the trees. A doe and her fawn barely glance up from their leafy brunch as golf carts glide past. In the distance beyond the second green, a lone workboat plies the Chester River for crabs. The wildlife and water views of Queenstown Harbor golf links appeal to Pat Dunn. The financial planner from Kensington celebrated his 47th birthday here recently with seven buddies, whacking little white balls around with the Chesapeake Bay for a backdrop.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | March 7, 2008
The O'Malley administration's effort to tighten shoreline development restrictions gained political momentum yesterday, as local officials announced their support for the bill after winning key concessions. But the compromise worried environmental advocates, who said they hope the legislation will still be sufficient to ensure that the 24-year-old Critical Area law can better protect the Chesapeake Bay from development. Developers also continued to object to the proposed rules, saying they go too far. Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr., president of the Maryland Association of Counties, joined administration officials at a hearing before the House Environmental Matters Committee yesterday to declare the support of his politically potent group for the compromise.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2001
The Anne Arundel County Council unanimously approved last night a revised and stronger version of a bill that exempts a high-tech business park at the former David Taylor Research Center from some state environmental laws, knocking down another roadblock in the project's path to completion. Council members said the revised bill provides for an adequate buffer zone between the sun-dappled waters of the Severn River and the proposed office development. The original bill won narrow approval in January after a late-night filibuster.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2005
The future of Shady Side's 477-acre Franklin Point Park is unclear after Anne Arundel County officials pulled out of a longstanding deal to build ball fields on the land. The county pulled out of the deal after the state Critical Area Commission ruled this month that ball fields, parking lots and trails could not be built over wetlands. The park fronts the Chesapeake Bay and features about 271 acres protected by Critical Area laws, which restrict building on environmentally sensitive coastal land.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2003
In a move that won praise from environmentalists, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. named former Senate Minority Leader Martin G. Madden yesterday to lead a key commission that oversees development close to the Chesapeake and Maryland's coastal bays. Madden, a moderate Republican from Howard County, will assume the chairmanship of the Chesapeake Bay Critical Areas Commission on May 1. The governor praised Madden's "proven record of leadership on important environmental issues." "I look forward to working with him to implement balanced, common sense solutions that protect our most vulnerable shorelines," Ehrlich said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.