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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 2005
. The floating cap of sea ice on the Arctic Ocean shrank this summer to what is probably its smallest size in at least a century, continuing a trend toward less summer ice, a team of climate experts reported yesterday. That shift is hard to explain without attributing it in part to human-caused global warming, they and other experts on the region said. The change also appears to be becoming self-sustaining: the increased open water absorbs solar energy that would otherwise be reflected back into space by bright white ice, said Ted A. Scambos, a scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo.
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NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Sometimes recognition for a job well done is a long time coming. Seventy years ago, Pasadena resident William Tiernan was an 18-year-old sailor in the British Merchant Navy, participating in one of World War II's most dangerous assignments, the Russian Arctic convoy. A couple of weeks ago, the 87-year-old Tiernan received special recognition for that duty with an Arctic Star Medal - an award only recently issued by the British government. "My opinion is that the merchant marine is not recognized like the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines are. That's why we didn't get no medals" until now, the British-born Tiernan said without any bitterness Still, he noted, "To this day, merchant marines cannot join the VFW. " The Russian Arctic convoy, in which Allied troops supplied the Soviet Union in its struggle against invading German forces, has often been referred to as a suicide mission.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2006
The first detailed analysis of a climatic and biological record from the seabed near the North Pole indicates that 55 million years ago the Arctic Ocean was far warmer than scientists imagined - a Floridian year-round average of 74 degrees Fahrenheit. The findings, published today in the journal Nature, fill in a blank spot in scientists' understanding of climate history. And they suggest that scientists have greatly underestimated the power of greenhouse gases to warm the Arctic. Previous computer simulations, without the benefit of seabed sampling, did not suggest an ancient Arctic that was nearly so warm, the authors said.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | February 5, 2013
Not long after President Barack Obama promised to fight climate change in his inaugural address, temperatures soared to 70 last week in Baltimore - in late January. Our weather continues to be unrecognizable. Last summer was the hottest ever recorded at Baltimore/Washington Thurgood Marshall International Airport. And across the 48 contiguous states, 2012 was the warmest on record by a huge margin. Globally, the heating trend - fueled mostly by the combustion of fossil fuels - proceeds apace.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF AND FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | September 7, 1997
He's known to the entire crew of the Liberty ship, S.S. John W. Brown, as "Blackie," the man who cheated death four times on the Murmansk run and still goes to sea after six decades.Charles F. Blockston, of Rosedale, Baltimore County, is the third engineer on the Brown, docked at Pier 1, Clinton Street, Canton. Last month, at 78, he helped sail the old freighter up the East Coast to Connecticut."Blackie's" story begins on June 27, 1942, when his ship and 37 others set sail from Iceland to Murmansk in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | January 26, 2007
Hang in there, Baltimore. Sure it's cold, but spring is coming. You can ask the hardy souls in Barrow, on Alaska's North Slope. On Tuesday, after two months of winter darkness, they cheered their first glimpse of the sun. Old Sol rose at 1:06 p.m. Sure, it set again into the Arctic Ocean just 67 minutes later, but days lengthen quickly up there. Today's daylight will stretch for 2 1/2 hours. And from May 11 through Aug. 3, the sun will shine on Barrow 24 hours a day.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2000
At 420 feet long and 16,000 tons, the Coast Guard cutter Healy has the power to ram through Arctic ice 4 1/2 feet thick at a speed of 3 knots. It also has 4,200 feet of lab space for scientific study. This combination of strength and technology makes the Healy the Coast Guard's premier icebreaker, one of three in its class. "The Healy is a state-of-the-art, world-class ocean vessel," said Commander George DuPree, chief of the Coast Guard's ice-breaking division, a passenger on the Healy, which docked last night at Pier 4 at North Locust Point Marine Terminal.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,Los Angeles Times | August 3, 2007
MOSCOW -- Two Russian mini-submarines returned to the surface at the North Pole yesterday after diving to the sea bottom to plant a flag and collect geological samples. "It was so lovely down there," Artur Chilingarov, a prominent polar explorer who descended in the first mini-sub, told Russian news media after the dive. "If a hundred or a thousand years from now, someone goes down to where we were, they will see the Russian flag," he said, according to the Russian news agency Itar-Tass.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 1998
Weather satellites operating over an 18-year period have revealed an increase in the ice covering Antarctic waters and a decrease in Arctic sea ice.This asymmetric trend, a team of scientists says, is consistent with one theory of what would happen if a gradual increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere were causing global warming.Results of the satellite investigation by Dr. Donald J. Cavalieri and his colleagues at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, were published recently in the journal Nature.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | July 4, 1991
For years scientists have believed that one of the first signals of global warming would be the shrinking of the polar ice cover.In today's edition of the British publication Nature, two scientist report a 2 percent decrease in the Arctic Ocean's ice cover between 1978 and 1987, discovered through a statistical analysis of satellite data.While this record may be an indication of global warming, th scientists say their work is not conclusive evidence because it is a relatively short record.
TRAVEL
By Lester Picker, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
It's a crisp, cold morning. Inside our recreational vehicles, we don fleece jackets and sweatshirts as the temperature hovers just below freezing. Ice has formed on one of the kettle ponds we are parked alongside in the vast Arctic tundra. As we step outside, the red and yellow colors of fall are all around us. It is August in Canada's famed Yukon Territory. Few vistas in this world are as spectacular as the land above the Arctic Circle. The tundra is truly a magical place, stretching as far as the eye can see, a place that few people ever experience.
NEWS
By Waleed Abdalati | November 19, 2009
L ast month, 360 miles above the Earth, a little-noticed light went dark. It was the third and final laser on NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), developed and managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. For the last 6 1/2 years, ICESat has been using precise laser measurements to determine how much the Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets are contributing to the rise of the global seas and how much the sea ice that blankets the Arctic Ocean is thinning in ways that can affect climate all over the world.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,Los Angeles Times | August 3, 2007
MOSCOW -- Two Russian mini-submarines returned to the surface at the North Pole yesterday after diving to the sea bottom to plant a flag and collect geological samples. "It was so lovely down there," Artur Chilingarov, a prominent polar explorer who descended in the first mini-sub, told Russian news media after the dive. "If a hundred or a thousand years from now, someone goes down to where we were, they will see the Russian flag," he said, according to the Russian news agency Itar-Tass.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | January 26, 2007
Hang in there, Baltimore. Sure it's cold, but spring is coming. You can ask the hardy souls in Barrow, on Alaska's North Slope. On Tuesday, after two months of winter darkness, they cheered their first glimpse of the sun. Old Sol rose at 1:06 p.m. Sure, it set again into the Arctic Ocean just 67 minutes later, but days lengthen quickly up there. Today's daylight will stretch for 2 1/2 hours. And from May 11 through Aug. 3, the sun will shine on Barrow 24 hours a day.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | September 22, 2006
Something unusual is going on in the Beaufort Sea, a remote part of the Arctic Ocean north of Alaska. Over the past six weeks, a huge "lake" bigger than the state of Indiana has melted out of the sea ice. Within the past week, this "polynya" - a Russian word for any open water surrounded by sea ice - finally melted through a part of the ice that separated it from the open ocean, forming a kind of bay in the planet's northern ice cap. "The reason we're...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2006
The first detailed analysis of a climatic and biological record from the seabed near the North Pole indicates that 55 million years ago the Arctic Ocean was far warmer than scientists imagined - a Floridian year-round average of 74 degrees Fahrenheit. The findings, published today in the journal Nature, fill in a blank spot in scientists' understanding of climate history. And they suggest that scientists have greatly underestimated the power of greenhouse gases to warm the Arctic. Previous computer simulations, without the benefit of seabed sampling, did not suggest an ancient Arctic that was nearly so warm, the authors said.
NEWS
August 13, 1998
An excerpt from a Tuesday Chicago Tribune editorial:INTERIOR Secretary Bruce Babbitt has unveiled a plan to allow limited leasing of oil and gas reserves on a part of the 23-million-acre National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska.The plan pleases neither the oil industry, which wanted much more access, nor environmentalists, who wanted the secretary to bar all exploratory drilling.The plan represents a "balance," the secretary said, based on "sound science." It came after 18 months of study, numerous hearings and his own personal field trip to the frozen tundra.
TRAVEL
September 26, 1999
A family on top of the world; A MEMORABLE PLACEDEBRA A. BARSOTTISPECIAL TO THE SUNEnchanting Norwegian music set the mood as dancers portrayed the mystical creatures of the night. Beams of muted light played across the stages' backdrop as echoes of the wilderness faded into the shadows. All motion ceased and light dissolved as the midnight hour approached. In the new silence, breaths were held in anticipation. Slowly the backdrop was raised, exposing the radiance -- the spectacular radiance of the Midnight Sun.Well, that was what was supposed to happen as we sat with hundreds of tourists in the lounge of the North Cape Visitors Center on Norway's farthest reaches.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 2005
. The floating cap of sea ice on the Arctic Ocean shrank this summer to what is probably its smallest size in at least a century, continuing a trend toward less summer ice, a team of climate experts reported yesterday. That shift is hard to explain without attributing it in part to human-caused global warming, they and other experts on the region said. The change also appears to be becoming self-sustaining: the increased open water absorbs solar energy that would otherwise be reflected back into space by bright white ice, said Ted A. Scambos, a scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo.
NEWS
August 5, 2005
Quick Takes Superficial look at natural cures Natural Cures "They" Don't Want You To Know About, by Kevin Trudeau, (Alliance Publishing Group Inc., $29.95) This is an updated version of a popular title that claims to give readers the skinny on natural cures. It doesn't stop there. The book lashes out at corporate America and the media. Kevin Trudeau says that pharmaceutical giants, food companies, trade groups and the government are in cahoots to keep people sick. "Natural cures are being suppressed and hidden from the public," he writes.
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