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NEWS
By Todd Holden and Todd Holden,Special to The Sun | October 22, 2006
Time was, when folks drove east on Route 22 past Churchville, food, cars, golf and good times were available in abundance. The Big M Drive-In and Outdoor movies folded and the Aberdeen Cattle Auction is no more. Still, one Churchville landmark - the Arctic Circle - continues to draw crowds. The Arctic Circle began in 1966 when Ellis Reeves stopped selling ice cream in Washington and took over the soft ice cream stand. "I had tough times, no work, so I went to work for Freezey Palace driving an ice-cream truck in the nation's capital.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
For two years, the crew of the USS Jeannette was trapped in ice north of the Bering Sea. The sailors staged musicals, played football, ate seal meat (which they dubbed "arctic turkey") and even performed surgery on the eye of a crew member afflicted with syphilis. Then, in June 1881, the real adventure began: The Jeannette sank. The men loaded their provisions onto dog sleds and began the trek to Siberia, some 1,000 miles away. Journalist Hampton Sides tells the story of the Jeannette's star-crossed expedition in his latest book, "In the Kingdom of Ice. " Sides spent more than three years poring over thousands of pages of records kept by the ship's captain, letters, diary entries and testimony from the 13 men who survived the brutal journey.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 18, 1999
"Lovers of the Arctic Circle" is an exceedingly graceful and absorbing iteration on a theme that has been all the rage recently: the element of chance and fate in bringing potential lovers together.This has been explored with perky inventiveness in movies like "Sliding Doors" and "Next Stop Wonderland" and with New Age earnestness in tear-jerkers like "City of Angels," but director Julio Medem takes a more sophisticated tack. He infuses "Lovers of the Arctic Circle" with fable-like wonder, romantic innocence and subtle eroticism.
TRAVEL
By Lester Picker, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
It's a crisp, cold morning. Inside our recreational vehicles, we don fleece jackets and sweatshirts as the temperature hovers just below freezing. Ice has formed on one of the kettle ponds we are parked alongside in the vast Arctic tundra. As we step outside, the red and yellow colors of fall are all around us. It is August in Canada's famed Yukon Territory. Few vistas in this world are as spectacular as the land above the Arctic Circle. The tundra is truly a magical place, stretching as far as the eye can see, a place that few people ever experience.
TRAVEL
By Peter Mandel and Peter Mandel,Special to the Sun | February 11, 2007
FLOATING RESORTS. YOU CAN KEEP THEM. You know the kind of cruises I mean: tropical cocktails, gift-shop islands, sun-and-deck chair afternoons. When I'm at sea, I want adventure. Cresting waves, puffs of wind, the works. This is why I find myself onboard a Russian icebreaker that is hardened to cut through icebergs and glaciers and is churning north. Next stop: the Arctic Circle and the coast of Greenland. Polar bears will be there, I hope, and maybe some whales and snowy owls. If we make it, I will down a shot of Smirnoff with the crew, not a pina colada.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | October 31, 2006
Ellis V. Reeves, whose double-thick milkshakes and soft ice cream cones kept the crowds coming for decades to his Churchville drive-in, died of heart failure Saturday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 88. Mr. Reeves was born in Sparta, N.C., raised in Bel Air and graduated from Bel Air High School in 1936. After working as a Harford County dairy farmer and driving a Freezey Palace ice cream truck in Washington, Mr. Reeves teamed with his brother-in-law in the 1950s as co-owner of the Twin Kiss soft ice cream stand on Martin Boulevard.
NEWS
By Fawn Vrazo and Fawn Vrazo,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 19, 1998
ROVANIEMI, Finland -- It all started in Asia Minor, now Turkey. A good-hearted bishop named Nicholas, the legend goes, saved poor girls from prostitution by throwing bags of gold coins through their windows and down a chimney.Over the next 1,700 years, with a little help from Dutch settlers in North America and poet Clement Clarke Moore, St. Nicholas became a merry old gent with a white beard and red suit who spends most of Christmas giving heaps of toys to good little girls and boys.Today, any child can see Santa by taking a short ride to the local shopping mall, from Tokyo to Towson.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
A couple of years ago, life for Adam Kikpak in the Canadian Arctic Circle town of Kugluktuk was about little more than what he called "bad stuff" and "bad people." The teenager lived on a steady diet of drugs and alcohol, dropping in and out of school and stumbling into minor trouble. Then he picked up a lacrosse stick. "It really changed my life around," said Kikpak, now 18, sober and resolved to graduate from high school in 2005. "You feel good when you go back to school and you play sports."
FEATURES
By Pat Hanna Kuehl and Pat Hanna Kuehl,Special to The Sun | December 18, 1994
So you've been sending those letters to Santa Claus to the North Pole. Ho! Ho! Ho! Maybe that's why you didn't get what you wanted for Christmas.According to the Finnish Tourist Board, Santa's official address is Arctic Circle, 96930 Rovaniemi, Finland, on the Arctic Circle in an upscale artisan center and entertainment park within sneezing distance of Rovaniemi, capital of Finnish Lapland. Remote as it is, it draws visitors from Asia and North and South America as well as from all over Europe.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 29, 1994
Thirty years ago people probably would have said pianist Helene Grimaud "plays like a man." That's because the 24-year-old French musician often chooses muscular pieces once considered practically off-limits to women -- such as Brahms' First Piano Concerto, which she performs this week with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. And she plays them with a passionate lack of inhibition that would have been hard to accept before the feminist revolution of the 1960s."Some people may still be surprised that a woman [pianist]
TRAVEL
By Peter Mandel and Peter Mandel,Special to the Sun | February 11, 2007
FLOATING RESORTS. YOU CAN KEEP THEM. You know the kind of cruises I mean: tropical cocktails, gift-shop islands, sun-and-deck chair afternoons. When I'm at sea, I want adventure. Cresting waves, puffs of wind, the works. This is why I find myself onboard a Russian icebreaker that is hardened to cut through icebergs and glaciers and is churning north. Next stop: the Arctic Circle and the coast of Greenland. Polar bears will be there, I hope, and maybe some whales and snowy owls. If we make it, I will down a shot of Smirnoff with the crew, not a pina colada.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | October 31, 2006
Ellis V. Reeves, whose double-thick milkshakes and soft ice cream cones kept the crowds coming for decades to his Churchville drive-in, died of heart failure Saturday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 88. Mr. Reeves was born in Sparta, N.C., raised in Bel Air and graduated from Bel Air High School in 1936. After working as a Harford County dairy farmer and driving a Freezey Palace ice cream truck in Washington, Mr. Reeves teamed with his brother-in-law in the 1950s as co-owner of the Twin Kiss soft ice cream stand on Martin Boulevard.
NEWS
By Todd Holden and Todd Holden,Special to The Sun | October 22, 2006
Time was, when folks drove east on Route 22 past Churchville, food, cars, golf and good times were available in abundance. The Big M Drive-In and Outdoor movies folded and the Aberdeen Cattle Auction is no more. Still, one Churchville landmark - the Arctic Circle - continues to draw crowds. The Arctic Circle began in 1966 when Ellis Reeves stopped selling ice cream in Washington and took over the soft ice cream stand. "I had tough times, no work, so I went to work for Freezey Palace driving an ice-cream truck in the nation's capital.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | April 25, 2004
Window Seat: Reading the Landscape from the Air, by Gregory Dicum. Chronicle Books. 175 pages. $14.95. Overriding current anxieties of commercial flying, Dicum celebrates the joys available by choosing the window seat. "The food might be utilitarian, the seat cramped, and your neighbor annoying," Dicum writes. "But the sheer pleasure of contemplating our planet from 35,000 feet (about 6.5 mi., or 10.7 km) in the air is worth any price. A century ago, nobody on Earth could have hoped to see this view."
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
A couple of years ago, life for Adam Kikpak in the Canadian Arctic Circle town of Kugluktuk was about little more than what he called "bad stuff" and "bad people." The teenager lived on a steady diet of drugs and alcohol, dropping in and out of school and stumbling into minor trouble. Then he picked up a lacrosse stick. "It really changed my life around," said Kikpak, now 18, sober and resolved to graduate from high school in 2005. "You feel good when you go back to school and you play sports."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 24, 2000
AKUREYRI, Iceland - It is nearly midnight at the Akureyri Golf Club - the northernmost 18-hole course on the planet - but you'd never know it from the activity. Small throngs of diehard golfers, from a group of six alcohol-fueled Reykjavik businessmen to electrical contractor Jim Boudreau from Worcester, Mass., are intently whacking little white orbs deep into the nighttime sky. Local wildlife is acting a bit strangely, too. Birds that should be sleeping scratch in the dirt, and shaggy-maned Icelandic horses gallop in nearby fields.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 20, 1991
Travelers on a Lapland Safari sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution's National Associate Program will skim across the snow north of the Arctic Circle on reindeer sleighs.The ride through the wooded wilderness, reindeer driving lessons and lunch in a traditional tepee near the town of Enontekio in northern Finland are part of an eight-day tour that departs New York Feb. 23 and will focus on the culture of the Laplanders.From Helsinki, visitors will fly to Roveniemi, just south of the Arctic Circle, which was rebuilt after World War II.The tour will visit the Enontekio and Lake Ounasjarvi area, where participants will be provided with snowsuits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | April 25, 2004
Window Seat: Reading the Landscape from the Air, by Gregory Dicum. Chronicle Books. 175 pages. $14.95. Overriding current anxieties of commercial flying, Dicum celebrates the joys available by choosing the window seat. "The food might be utilitarian, the seat cramped, and your neighbor annoying," Dicum writes. "But the sheer pleasure of contemplating our planet from 35,000 feet (about 6.5 mi., or 10.7 km) in the air is worth any price. A century ago, nobody on Earth could have hoped to see this view."
NEWS
By Colin Nickerson and Colin Nickerson,BOSTON GLOBE | December 25, 1999
HAFNARFJORDUR, Iceland -- This can be a tough country for blasting out a foundation or constructing a roadbed.Never mind the boiling geysers, wind-blasted precipices or frozen barrens. It's not the razor-sharp lava rock that daunts builders; it's the hidden people lurking below."There are all sorts of beings beneath our stones," says Brynjolfur Snorrason, a folklorist often asked to advise contractors on how best to avoid the lairs of Iceland's elves and other seldom-seen creatures, whose presence nonetheless seems to permeate this far northern island nation.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 18, 1999
"Lovers of the Arctic Circle" is an exceedingly graceful and absorbing iteration on a theme that has been all the rage recently: the element of chance and fate in bringing potential lovers together.This has been explored with perky inventiveness in movies like "Sliding Doors" and "Next Stop Wonderland" and with New Age earnestness in tear-jerkers like "City of Angels," but director Julio Medem takes a more sophisticated tack. He infuses "Lovers of the Arctic Circle" with fable-like wonder, romantic innocence and subtle eroticism.
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