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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 25, 1994
A ruptured pipeline in the Russian Arctic has spilled 80 million gallons of hot oil, soaking the fragile permafrost and posing potentially major environmental damage to the region, according reports received by the federal Department of Energy.William H. White, the deputy secretary of energy, said yesterday that the pipeline leak was months old, but that a dam that was jury-rigged by a Russian oil company to contain the leaking oil apparently burst in the last several days. He said that American industry officials in the remote Komi region of the Arctic reported that the spill had reached a tributary of the Pechora River, near the city of Usinsk, which in warmer months pours into the Arctic Ocean.
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NEWS
September 12, 2014
Canada may have given Baltimore a bi-centennial gift the other day when its prime minister announced the discovery of one of two Arctic exploration ships that were lost in the late 1840s. The two vessels, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, were Royal Navy warships converted for use in Arctic exploration. Both names should be familiar to Baltimoreans because they belonged to two of the ships that participated in the bombardment of Ft. McHenry. The HMS Erebus that was lost in the Arctic was actually built in 1826 and named after the original Erebus that was here.
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NEWS
October 28, 1994
Russian and American officials are still trying to determine exactly how much oil has spilled from a leaking pipeline near the Russian Arctic coast. Estimates range from just over 100,000 barrels, the figure offered by Russian industry officials, to more than 2 million barrels, which U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy William H. White cited as the more likely figure. The latter is some eight times the size of the spill created when the Exxon Valdez ran aground off Alaska in 1989. This would make the Russian spill one of the worst environmental disasters of its type in history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
The Firefly Music Festival is not for everyone, especially for those that find much of the following unappealing: Multiple days of camping, ironic tank-tops, drinking games, Grateful Dead tapestries, dust, drug dealers, bugs, hydration packs, portable toilets, 30-minute treks from camp to the festival grounds, high-waisted shorts, flying glow sticks and bad tanlines. For the rest of us - and there were approximately 80,000 music fans in attendance, according to Billboard - the four-day music festival that took place from Thursday to Sunday in Dover, Del., was an unofficial kickoff to summer celebration that was thrilling and - if we're being honest - draining.
NEWS
April 15, 1992
James Ellis Henson, the county's new human rights administrator, likes to talk about his ancestors -- great uncle Matthew Alexander Henson, co-discoverer of the North Pole with Robert E. Peary, and the Rev.Josiah Henson, a runaway slave portrayed in "Uncle Tom's Cabin."If they were alive today, his ancestors might be talking about him. An ardent student of black history, Henson does everything with flair.It is not surprising that when he began thinking about a way to honor his great uncle on the 83rd anniversary of the discovery of the North Pole -- April 6, 1909 -- Henson decided to follow in his footsteps.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 1, 1993
Atmospheric pollution over the Arctic, long a subject of environmental concern, has declined steadily and sharply in the last decade, federal scientists have found.The decrease in the smoglike haze is apparently linked to sharp reductions in pollution emissions in Europe and the former Soviet Union, scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say in a new report. The haze has diminished by about half during March and April, its worst months, since a peak in the early 1980s.
NEWS
By JONATHAN WATERMAN | November 3, 2005
In 1985, I lost myself in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Wild grizzlies gamboled shyly above camp, Arctic char dimpled the rivers and Dall sheep avalanched down mountainsides. I did not see the threat posed to the refuge by global warming. I had no idea that over the next 20 years scientists would predict the disappearance of the Brooks Range glaciers, that I would see acres of coast collapsing into the sea as permafrost foundations melted, that year-round ice would begin disappearing from the rivers or that the caribou herd would be reduced because of changes in snow cover.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 17, 1994
IQALUIT, Northwest Territories -- Adamie Pitseolak dreams of leading his people to master a more modern destiny as they carve an independent homeland out of the arctic ice.But with five years to go before they redraw the map of North America, there is growing anxiety among Canada's Inuit over whether Nunavut (Our Land) will be a shining success or a dismal failure.Once known as Eskimos (literally, "eaters of raw meat"), the Inuit yearn to preserve their ancestral ways of hunting, fishing and trapping across the snow-swept top of the globe, while also moving into the modern world and the next century.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria Brownworth and Victoria Brownworth,Special to the Sun | December 28, 2003
In Ben Jones' mesmermizing debut novel, The Rope Eater (Doubleday, 304 pages, $24), Brendan Kane, a Union Army deserter, returns North after the Civil War and signs onto a two-year stint as a ship's mate on the Narthex, bound for the Arctic. The crew, a cadre of second-rate sailors, paroled prisoners and other misfits, does not initially know its destination. Far from civilization, they are informed that the trip, led by the enigmatic Mr. West and scientist-in-residence Dr. Architeuthis, seeks to search out a tropical paradise in the heart of the Arctic ice. Under Dr. Architeuthis's tutelage, Kane learns to perform various navigational tasks.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2004
The Arctic is experiencing some of the most rapid and severe warming on the planet, according to a new, eight-nation report - the most comprehensive assessment of Earth's fragile northern cap to date. The report, a four-year effort involving hundreds of scientists, describes vast areas of melting ice, declining species and fading indigenous cultures. "It's affecting people up there now," said Robert Corell, the American oceanographer who led the project. "And there are very serious consequences for people on the rest of the planet."
FEATURES
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Two snowy owls have been trapped at Martin State Airport in Baltimore County and will be relocated away from the airport, aviation officials said Friday. A female owl was captured in a trap at the airport shortly after sunset on Thursday and a male owl was captured Friday morning, according to the Maryland Aviation Administration. The owls were captured in traps that the Maryland Aviation Administration and U.S. Department of Agriculture had placed on a grassy area on the north side of the airport.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Relatively milder but still colder-than-normal highs in the mid-30s are forecast Monday before another blast of frigid air moves over the region for the middle of the week. Early morning lows reached the upper 20s, with temperatures reaching the lower 40s by mid-morning. Winds were expected to become blustery and gusty, at 15-25 mph, by midday, dropping wind chills into the teens and then to the single digits by the evening. Mostly cloudy skies are forecast throughout the day. Single-digit lows are forecast Monday night, expected to drop to about 4 degrees at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport and 9 degrees in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By JaSina Wise | November 11, 2012
Let's talk about the wisdom of the storm called Sandy: that anything can happen to anyone - at any time. Even to someone like me. I live in Maryland. I am a divorced mother proudly raising a teenager and a tweenager. I work at one of the largest employers in the state. Most of Sandy's damage was in New York and New Jersey, with Maryland suffering relatively little harm. But not everyone in our state escaped unscathed. I was without electricity from Monday, Oct. 29 to Wednesday, Oct. 31. It was very cold in our house.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 29, 2012
Arctic ice spread to its largest footprint of the year March 18. It was smaller than normal, but not as small as a year earlier. The ice cap, defined as the total surface area of ocean that is at least 15 percent ice, reached 5.88 million square miles, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center . A year ago, the ice cover was the smallest since 1979, at 5.65 million square miles. It has averaged 6.12 million square miles since 1979. The peak was almost two weeks later than previous years, typically about March 6. Walt Meier, a research scientist at the center, isn't sure why that is but theorizes it's because the ice has more room to grow because of increased melting during the summer months.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
Alex Turner has a writer's eye. The Arctic Monkeys' singer-songwriter pens lyrics full of biting wit and pointed remarks. On "Reckless Serenade," a track from his band's recently released fourth album, he sings of the "type of kisses where teeth collide" before his narrator sadly retreats, singing, "Called up to listen to the voice of reason and got his answering machine. " His perspective, both humorous and earnest, stands out in modern-day rock. So where does the 25-year-old from Sheffield, England, draw inspiration?
NEWS
By Cindy Ross | April 4, 2011
The sky is beginning to glow pink as we bank the turn into the entrance of Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area in Pennsylvania. We hurry, not wanting to miss the show that is about to begin. Although we can't see the estimated 100,000 snow geese floating on the sheltered lagoon, we hear their communal voices. It's March, and these magnificent white birds are here for only a few weeks during their migratory passage to the Arctic. After resting and fattening up on local farm crops, they'll continue north to Canada's St. Lawrence River, ending eventually at their Alaskan mating and breeding grounds.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 29, 1992
RESOLUTE BAY, Northwest Territories -- Nowadays, to Canada's consternation, the dawning of expedition season in March also brings with it more modern explorers and entrepreneurs who tackle the High Arctic with high risks, high technology and highly unusual transport.Examples abound:* One U.S. polar promoter, who earned an entry in the Guinness Book of World Records by being the first to sky-dive onto the North Pole in 1981, has worn a Santa Claus suit to delight tourists he flies up every year to the globe's northern axis.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
An arctic air front is bringing cooler temperatures to the area - and even a chance of a snow flurry in the next few days - a big change from yesterday's balmy weather. Expect clear and blustery weather today with a high near 50, a 20-degree drop from yesterday's high, said National Weather Service meteorologist Brandon Peloquin. The temperature will continue to fall in the next few days, with high temperatures in the upper 40s forecast for tomorrow and highs in the low 40s Tuesday. Low temperatures Tuesday will be below freezing, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | March 10, 2011
Here’s a confession: I’m a sucker for the next big thing. When I first heard the Strokes’ “New York City Cops,” I immediately hopped on board. I gave fair shakes to the Hives, Bloc Party and even the Vines. Basically, if NME put a band on its cover, I was going to see what the fuss was about. This includes Arctic Monkeys, a personal favorite based on the strength of their filler-free debut Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not . Alex Turner, who dates my U.K. crush Alexa Chung, was an easily loveable frontman, all Sheffield swagger and boozed up adrenaline.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
The weeks of heavy rain that triggered historic flooding in northeast Australia this month have been blamed on what climatologists are now calling one of the strongest La Nina events in the Pacific Ocean since record-keeping began a half-century ago. La Nina's global influence is also being blamed for heavy rains in Indonesia and Brazil. But unusually persistent cold weather this winter in Maryland, and in much of the eastern United States, heavy December rains in Southern California, and snow across the Deep South are the work of separate weather patterns in the Arctic, scientists say. Called the Arctic, or North Atlantic, Oscillation, these air and ocean patterns have been unusually persistent for the second winter in a row, overwhelming weather "signals" from the tropical Pacific.
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