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By Michael Pakenham | July 4, 2004
The Architecture of Baltimore: An Illustrated History. Edited by Mary Ellen Hayward and Frank R. Shivers Jr. Johns Hopkins University. 297 pages. $55. With nearly 600 illustrations and substantial text contributions from eight distinguished historians and critics, this is the definitive inventory and guide to the architectural history of one of the premiere old cities of the United States. Some 10 years of research has brought the sweep of the book's survey from the Georgian mid-1700s up today - the reconstruction of the Hippodrome and brand new Brown Center at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Any long-established Baltimorean should treasure this volume for its celebration of tradition and innovation.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Orlando Ridout V, a historian of early Maryland buildings who explored crawl spaces and attics for their social and architectural details, died of pancreatic cancer complications April 6 at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The lifelong Annapolis resident was 59. "He literally wrote the book on Annapolis and its 18th-century architectural history," said Pete Lesher, chief curator at Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels. "He was one of those persons whose reputations literally did precede him. When I first met him, I expected a button-down look.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Orlando Ridout V, a historian of early Maryland buildings who explored crawl spaces and attics for their social and architectural details, died of pancreatic cancer complications April 6 at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The lifelong Annapolis resident was 59. "He literally wrote the book on Annapolis and its 18th-century architectural history," said Pete Lesher, chief curator at Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels. "He was one of those persons whose reputations literally did precede him. When I first met him, I expected a button-down look.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
William Boulton "Bo" Kelly Jr., a Baltimore architect, preservationist and civic leader who founded Baltimore Heritage and helped establish the Baltimore's Commission for Historical & Architectural Preservation, died Wednesday at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson of complications from an infection. The longtime Ruxton resident was 84. "Bo was a person who had an indomitable spirit and was also one of those wonderful characters you meet in life," said Walter G. Schamu, a partner in the firm of Schamu, Machowski, Grego Architects and a longtime friend.
NEWS
December 16, 2007
Notes Maryland history: For readers curious about the history of the state where they live, there's a wonderful book, published several years ago, that is absolutely worth a second look. Maryland, A Middle Temperament: 1634-1980 by Robert Brugger won rave reviews when it was published in 1996. It's expensive for a paperback -- $25.95 -- but it's extraordinarily readable. "The most comprehensive and readable history of the Free State ever published. It's absolutely the only account I've ever seen that makes almost all our state history seem important or entertaining or both.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
William Boulton "Bo" Kelly Jr., a Baltimore architect, preservationist and civic leader who founded Baltimore Heritage and helped establish the Baltimore's Commission for Historical & Architectural Preservation, died Wednesday at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson of complications from an infection. The longtime Ruxton resident was 84. "Bo was a person who had an indomitable spirit and was also one of those wonderful characters you meet in life," said Walter G. Schamu, a partner in the firm of Schamu, Machowski, Grego Architects and a longtime friend.
NEWS
July 26, 2007
Mechanic sits at hub of urban treasures It is too bad that the interior of the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre building has been demolished, as Kirby Fowler, president of the Downtown Partnership, noted in "Help asked on historic city sites" (July 18). However, there are still reasons to try to prevent the structure from being torn down. When it was designed, the Mechanic was an outstanding example of the cutting edge of architecture of the time. Its ebullient form and the rough-board finish of the exterior - created by the artistic use of random-size lumber for the concrete forms - earned it the designation by Progressive Architecture as "one of the important U.S. buildings of the 1960s."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 30, 1993
Nearly 20 years ago, a wrecking crew was tearing apart the old Emerson Hotel at the northwest corner of Calvert and Baltimore streets.It was a standard wrecking job of a familiar landmark at the end of its economic life. There were a few nostalgic pieces in the newspapers. Some people who walked by recalled their high school proms or wedding receptions at the Emerson, but there was not much thought given to what a magnificent piece of 1911 construction and design was being trashed.Now two decades after the Emerson's demise, a new exhibition opening tomorrow at the AIA Gallery on West Chase Street looks at the old hotel and the men who gave Baltimore so many of our fallen -- and standing -- landmarks.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2005
Five decades after purchasing Brooklandwood, St. Paul's School is upgrading the historic mansion while preserving its architectural character and history. Brooklandwood is a Georgian mansion built on a hill on the west side of Falls Road, on the St. Paul's campus in Brooklandville. In 1793, Charles Carroll, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, built the estate as a summer residence for his daughter, Mary, and her husband, Richard Caton. Carroll was known for living and entertaining in grand style and wanted his children to have a place in which to do the same.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
The architectural heritage of Carroll County is preserved among the 19th-century homes and tree-lined streets of Uniontown.The village is one of the oldest in the county, dating back to the late 18th century.Situated on a large tract of land that was known as "The Orchard," this land was granted to an Englishman named Metcalf from the West Indies.It then passed out of Metcalf's hands by a deed in 1802 toErhart Cover, who had the land laid out in lots by a local surveyor,John Hyder.The original name of the village was "The Forks," so named because of Buffalo Road and Hagerstown Pike coming together at the western end of town.
NEWS
December 16, 2007
Notes Maryland history: For readers curious about the history of the state where they live, there's a wonderful book, published several years ago, that is absolutely worth a second look. Maryland, A Middle Temperament: 1634-1980 by Robert Brugger won rave reviews when it was published in 1996. It's expensive for a paperback -- $25.95 -- but it's extraordinarily readable. "The most comprehensive and readable history of the Free State ever published. It's absolutely the only account I've ever seen that makes almost all our state history seem important or entertaining or both.
NEWS
July 26, 2007
Mechanic sits at hub of urban treasures It is too bad that the interior of the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre building has been demolished, as Kirby Fowler, president of the Downtown Partnership, noted in "Help asked on historic city sites" (July 18). However, there are still reasons to try to prevent the structure from being torn down. When it was designed, the Mechanic was an outstanding example of the cutting edge of architecture of the time. Its ebullient form and the rough-board finish of the exterior - created by the artistic use of random-size lumber for the concrete forms - earned it the designation by Progressive Architecture as "one of the important U.S. buildings of the 1960s."
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2005
Driving along Route 136, Indian Springs Farm is hard to miss, with its dilapidated structures protruding from gently rolling hills. A three-story brick barn with silos adorning each corner stands out among the assortment of aging buildings on the 850-acre farm. The history of the property is as colorful and alluring as the architecture. It served as a stopover point for French troops during the Revolutionary War, an alleged hiding place for Confederate weaponry during the Civil War, and a backdrop for a scene in a feature film in 2004.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2005
Five decades after purchasing Brooklandwood, St. Paul's School is upgrading the historic mansion while preserving its architectural character and history. Brooklandwood is a Georgian mansion built on a hill on the west side of Falls Road, on the St. Paul's campus in Brooklandville. In 1793, Charles Carroll, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, built the estate as a summer residence for his daughter, Mary, and her husband, Richard Caton. Carroll was known for living and entertaining in grand style and wanted his children to have a place in which to do the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 4, 2004
The Architecture of Baltimore: An Illustrated History. Edited by Mary Ellen Hayward and Frank R. Shivers Jr. Johns Hopkins University. 297 pages. $55. With nearly 600 illustrations and substantial text contributions from eight distinguished historians and critics, this is the definitive inventory and guide to the architectural history of one of the premiere old cities of the United States. Some 10 years of research has brought the sweep of the book's survey from the Georgian mid-1700s up today - the reconstruction of the Hippodrome and brand new Brown Center at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Any long-established Baltimorean should treasure this volume for its celebration of tradition and innovation.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2002
The mysterious mansion in the most populous part of Columbia -- longtime home of a woman who prized her privacy -- is living a quiet life of deterioration, its halls empty and its windows boarded up. But a whirl of attention and activity is bearing down on the imposing house on the 300-acre Blandair estate. Howard County's parks department has picked National Park Service preservationists to restore it. Maryland Historical Trust experts -- eager to get the house and its outbuildings on the National Register of Historic Places -- are busy studying it. A committee of residents is figuring out who should move in when it is once again grand; groups are already in line.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | May 4, 1996
American cities have become increasingly crowded with buildings that offer "more of the same" -- architectural additions that resemble the structures to which they are attached so much that it's nearly impossible to tell what is original and what has been added.It can be far more difficult for an architect and client to design a building that grows out of its surroundings but contributes a new dimension.That's what the Jewish Historical Society of Maryland has done with the design of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building, a $2.25 million history and education center for which ground will be broken tomorrow at Lloyd and Watson streets in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2002
The mysterious mansion in the most populous part of Columbia -- longtime home of a woman who prized her privacy -- is living a quiet life of deterioration, its halls empty and its windows boarded up. But a whirl of attention and activity is bearing down on the imposing house on the 300-acre Blandair estate. Howard County's parks department has picked National Park Service preservationists to restore it. Maryland Historical Trust experts -- eager to get the house and its outbuildings on the National Register of Historic Places -- are busy studying it. A committee of residents is figuring out who should move in when it is once again grand; groups are already in line.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | May 4, 1996
American cities have become increasingly crowded with buildings that offer "more of the same" -- architectural additions that resemble the structures to which they are attached so much that it's nearly impossible to tell what is original and what has been added.It can be far more difficult for an architect and client to design a building that grows out of its surroundings but contributes a new dimension.That's what the Jewish Historical Society of Maryland has done with the design of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building, a $2.25 million history and education center for which ground will be broken tomorrow at Lloyd and Watson streets in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 30, 1993
Nearly 20 years ago, a wrecking crew was tearing apart the old Emerson Hotel at the northwest corner of Calvert and Baltimore streets.It was a standard wrecking job of a familiar landmark at the end of its economic life. There were a few nostalgic pieces in the newspapers. Some people who walked by recalled their high school proms or wedding receptions at the Emerson, but there was not much thought given to what a magnificent piece of 1911 construction and design was being trashed.Now two decades after the Emerson's demise, a new exhibition opening tomorrow at the AIA Gallery on West Chase Street looks at the old hotel and the men who gave Baltimore so many of our fallen -- and standing -- landmarks.
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