Advertisement
HomeCollectionsArchitect
IN THE NEWS

Architect

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Theodore A. Bork, a retired architect who had worked for the Rouse Co. and later the U.S. State Department, died May 23 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at his Columbia home. He was 83. The son of a businessman and a homemaker, Theodore Alvin Bork was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y. After graduating from Brooklyn Technical High School, he earned both bachelor's and master's degrees in 1950 in architecture from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y. Mr. Bork served in the Army stateside during the Korean War, teaching mathematics to officers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Kathy Hudson and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
When it comes to landscape architects' own gardens, some are like shoemakers' shoes -- untended. Their owners are too busy making other spaces beautiful. Not so with Catherine Mahan, founding partner of Mahan Rykiel; Stuart Ortel, principal and founder of Stone Hill Design; and Carol Macht, principal and founding partner of Hord Coplan Macht. These well-respected Baltimore landscape architects have created gorgeous home gardens. Each is an extension of the house and in keeping with its architecture.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Charles Edwin Lamb, an architect of forward-looking, modernist structures and a founder of the RTKL firm, died of complications of Parkinson's disease Dec. 12 at the Heron Point Retirement Community in Chestertown. He was 87 and had lived in Baltimore and Annapolis. A winner of national design awards, Mr. Lamb designed the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, a John Deere distribution center in Timonium and the Edward A. Garmatz Federal Court House on Lombard Street. He was involved with early plans for downtown Baltimore's Charles Center, Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium and the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
Edwin "Ted" William Baker, one of Columbia's original planners and a world traveler whose pursuits included rough-terrain horseback riding, died of a cardiac arrest Tuesday. The Baltimore resident was 77. Mr. Baker grew up in California and earned a bachelor's degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley in 1959. His two years in the Navy after graduation fueled a lasting love of visiting new places, said his daughter, Caroline S.A. Baker of Baltimore. "He traveled all over in those two years and wrote postcards from all different hemispheres — from Japan and Sydney, Australia, and off the coast of Africa," she said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Calvin K. Kobsa, a semiretired Baltimore architect who was the founder of Calvin Kern Kobsa & Associates, died May 10 of complications after brain surgery at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 86. "Calvin will be remembered as a kind soul and a good architect," said Walter G. Schamu, founder and president of the Baltimore architectural firm of Schamu Machowski + Patterson. "He was always interested in the other person's career and was always a very friendly and affable fellow.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2013
Gwen Darwin McDade, a retired architect who worked on the Johns Hopkins medical campus and later designed structures for the State Highway Administration, died of heart disease Saturday at his Glen Arm home. He was 87. Born in Verona, Pa., he was the son of a contractor and a secretary. The family lived in New Kensington, Pa. Mr. McDade joined the Army immediately after graduating from New Kensington High School. He was assigned to an infantry unit fighting in Belgium during World War II. Family members said he was injured as he was loading heavy- armament shell casings during the Battle of the Bulge.
NEWS
November 18, 2012
John Johansen died on October 25. His name is virtually unknown in Baltimore, but his legacy is not. He was the architect of our Morris Mechanic Theater. Johansen was one of the Harvard Five, a group of young post World War II architects that included such giants as Philip Johnson and Marcel Brewer. To add further to his professional creditability, he married Walter Gropius' daughter. (Gropius was the founder of Germany's Bauthaus School of Architecture.) The Morris Mechanic is a wonderful rendition of the style known as Brutalism.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
I repeated a blooper in my recent column on the 100th anniversary of Baltimore's Pennsylvania Station that was caught by a sharp-eyed Roland Park resident and lawyer, John C. Murphy, who comes from a family of Baltimore architects. I had stated with the authority of numerous articles (some that appeared in this newspaper) that Kenneth Murchison, who had designed Baltimore's Pennsylvania Station, had been a member of the esteemed New York City architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 9, 2008
George Spear Salabes, an architect, died Dec. 1 of complications from surgery at Sinai Hospital. The Pikesville resident was 68. Born in Baltimore and raised near Druid Hill Park and in Mount Washington, he attended the Park School and was a 1958 City College graduate. He earned an architectural degree from Cornell University and served in the Army. Mr. Salabes was a co-founder of Nelson-Salabes Architects in Towson. Among his projects were Heather Ridge, the Owings Mills Jewish Community Center, midrise apartments at the Village of Cross Keys, the RCMD Building in Towson and the Cove apartments in Columbia.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | April 4, 1995
Richard Winston Ayers, an architect whose use of both traditional and modern design elements can be seen in some of Baltimore's most notable institutional buildings, died Friday at his Homeland residence of melanoma.Mr. Ayers, a principal in the architectural firm of Ayers-Saint-Gross Inc., was 84. He had been semiretired since 1985.In the 1940s, he designed Shriver Hall on the Homewood Campus of the Johns Hopkins University. Thus began a relationship with the university that lasted more than four decades and led to seven other buildings, including the Milton S. Eisenhower Library, the Newton H. White Athletic Center, the Mudd Biology Research Complex, Barton and Garland halls and the Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
When Beechfield Elementary/Middle School fifth-graders were asked to design their dream homes 15 years ago, they almost always included a "safe room," a place where they could escape violence, according to Ayers Saint Gross president Jim Wheeler. Today, none do. Their dream houses have video game rooms and swimming pools. It's a particularly gratifying shift for the architects volunteering in the West Baltimore public school to see. "One day, we'll hire one of these students," Wheeler said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Calvin K. Kobsa, a semiretired Baltimore architect who was the founder of Calvin Kern Kobsa & Associates, died May 10 of complications after brain surgery at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 86. "Calvin will be remembered as a kind soul and a good architect," said Walter G. Schamu, founder and president of the Baltimore architectural firm of Schamu Machowski + Patterson. "He was always interested in the other person's career and was always a very friendly and affable fellow.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
On Gibson Island, where no two homes are alike, a magnificent 1960s modern house sits on 1.8 acres of wooded property at the highest point in the area, and is on the market for $1.29 million. Often referred to as the "treehouse," 703 Skywater Road was designed by Ulrich Franzen, a German-born architect who began his career with famous architect I. M. Pei. The home's exterior composition features glass, steel and stone. The open interior features a mahogany ceiling throughout, a massive stone fireplace, walnut built-in shelves and doors, slate and ceramic tile flooring, glass walls, and vintage St. Charles steel kitchen cabinets (the same used by Frank Lloyd Wright in his Pennsylvania masterpiece, Fallingwater)
NEWS
March 5, 2014
I have recently been made aware of plans for Symphony Woods that deeply disturb me ( "Inner Arbor plans 'wow' Howard Co. design panel," Feb. 27). I remember Symphony Woods as a wooded site that was selected to be Columbia's Town Center Park. In 1965 Jim Rouse and his planners hired my firm to design the Music Pavilion for the Washington National Symphony. The walk through the woods to the pavilion site inspired my design. Now I understand the proposed Inner Arbor plan, which ignores Jim Rouse's original vision, will scatter out-of-scale "attractions" instead of creating a beautiful park around the pavilion.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Charles Edwin Lamb, an architect of forward-looking, modernist structures and a founder of the RTKL firm, died of complications of Parkinson's disease Dec. 12 at the Heron Point Retirement Community in Chestertown. He was 87 and had lived in Baltimore and Annapolis. A winner of national design awards, Mr. Lamb designed the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, a John Deere distribution center in Timonium and the Edward A. Garmatz Federal Court House on Lombard Street. He was involved with early plans for downtown Baltimore's Charles Center, Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium and the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Ron A. Szymanski, who was chief software architect at Aberdeen Proving Ground, died July 26 of stomach cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 34. Born and raised in Middlesex, N.J., Mr. Szymanski was a 1996 graduate of Middlesex High School. In 2000, he earned a bachelor's degree in math education from The College of New Jersey in Ewing. In 2004, he earned a master's degree in computer science from Monmouth University in West Long Branch, N.J. "Ron always had a gift for computers, so that led him to accept an opportunity at Fort Monmouth rather than going into teaching," said his wife of nine years, the former Amy Erica Speiser.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | March 29, 2007
LOS ANGELES -- Richard Rogers, an Italian-born Englishman who wields political influence as a liberal member of Britain's House of Lords and the unpaid chief of the London city government's Architecture and Urbanism Unit, was named the winner yesterday of the 2007 Pritzker Architecture Prize, the profession's leading award. Rogers' signature buildings over the past 30 years include heralded temples to art (the Pompidou Center museum in Paris, co-designed with Renzo Piano), commerce (the Lloyd's of London insurance tower)
NEWS
January 24, 2006
Powell Raymond Staines III, an architect and avid boater, died of cancer Jan. 17 at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 53. Mr. Staines was born in Annapolis and was a lifelong resident of Severna Park. He was a 1970 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington and earned an associate's degree in architecture from Anne Arundel Community College. "He passed the architectural licensing examination and became a certified architect," said his son, Timothy R. Staines of Arnold. For the past 20 years, Mr. Staines had been a staff architect at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he checked designs for new buildings and oversaw renovations and remodeling projects, his son said.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | April 19, 2013
As many times as I have stood on the MARC station platform in West Baltimore, I never considered there was a fantastic, Jules Verne-like interior just across Franklin Street. I assumed the fire-damaged brick building alongside the rail tracks was just another derelict structure. After a visit there this week, I learned that one of Baltimore's fascinating industrial archaeological sites endures in the Midtown Edmondson neighborhood. The story of this dusty old West Baltimore ice-making and storage plant has been making the rounds of planners and architects.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Designed by the influential Baltimore architects Edward L. Palmer and William D. Lamdin in 1925 and built in 1928, the home at 101 Witherspoon Road is one of the premier properties in Homeland. This North Baltimore home is built of local stone with a Vermont slate roof, and it has over 7,000 square feet of living space. The property is being offered by Hill & Co. Realtors for $1.25 million. "It's a unique property with one of the largest lots in Homeland," said Mary Lynne Mullican, the listing agent for Hill & Co. "The wrought-iron work on the back loggia is beautiful.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.