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Archimedes Palimpsest

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By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | August 4, 2006
Experts at the Walters Art Museum have taken the Archimedes Palimpsest to Stanford University in California in an effort to decipher some of the prized document's detail with a particle accelerator. A Webcast is planned for 7 p.m. today to announce the latest findings. Researchers at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory are using X-ray fluorescence to decode the ancient text. The process takes advantage of iron in the ink used by the ancient scribe who copied Archimedes' work onto parchment.
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By Mike Giuliano | October 25, 2011
The ugliest exhibit in town just now is at the Walters Art Museum. Let me explain. "Lost and Found: The Secrets of Archimedes" is a fascinating show capping 12 years of scholarly research into a rare book that contains texts by that ancient Greek mathematician. It's the book itself that is a wreck. What's nearly miraculous is that the book survived at all. The story of how it survived is as striking as the texts it contains. Archimedes, who lived in the Greek city of Syracuse in the third century B.C., had long passed from the scene when a 10th-century scribe in Constantinople copied some of his math-related treatises onto goatskin parchment.
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By Mike Giuliano | October 25, 2011
The ugliest exhibit in town just now is at the Walters Art Museum. Let me explain. "Lost and Found: The Secrets of Archimedes" is a fascinating show capping 12 years of scholarly research into a rare book that contains texts by that ancient Greek mathematician. It's the book itself that is a wreck. What's nearly miraculous is that the book survived at all. The story of how it survived is as striking as the texts it contains. Archimedes, who lived in the Greek city of Syracuse in the third century B.C., had long passed from the scene when a 10th-century scribe in Constantinople copied some of his math-related treatises onto goatskin parchment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2011
Twelve years ago, Walters Art Museum curator Will Noel opened a parcel and discovered what he calls "Archimedes' brain in a box. " Thus began a search for buried treasure — in this case, the lost writings of Archimedes of Syracuse, a famed Greek mathematician and inventor who lived in the third century B.C. Noel and his boss, museum director Gary Vikan, found a 174-page book made of cured goatskin that was ugly beyond belief. The sheaves were singed around the edges, the text and pages were defaced by water stains, and mold had eaten away entire sections.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
Using space-age tools to peer beneath the ink of a 12th-century prayer book, scientists in Maryland have discovered an even more ancient treasure - the only known copy in its original Greek of a work by the scientist Archimedes. The text, called "On Floating Bodies," is a medieval copy of the treatise first penned by Archimedes in the third century B.C. It had been erased and overwritten by monks in the 12th century, creating a twice-used parchment book known as a "palimpsest." Two teams of scientists, one from the Johns Hopkins University, have been working on the "Archimedes Palimpsest" since January, laboring to reveal the obliterated text with modern imaging technologies developed for medicine and space research.
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Will Noel knows a treasure when he sees it. Lately he has been like a man just put down in Ali Baba's cave.The treasure Noel is contemplating these days is a thousand-year-old book, containing ideas that go even deeper in time. It is the most important ancient text ever to fall into the care of the Walters Art Gallery, where Noel is curator of manuscripts and rare books.It is a "palimpsest," a twice-used book. The Archimedes Palimpsest.The original texts in the book were inscribed in Greek in the 10th century, probably in Constantinople while it was still a capital of the Christian world, and before it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453 and became a capital of the Islamic world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | September 3, 2009
It's among the most iconic images of the Civil War. President Abraham Lincoln and Gen. George B. McClellan are conferring at a table erected beneath a tent a few weeks after the Battle of Antietam. McClellan looks both weary and worried. He leans forward slightly as Lincoln leans back. It's easy to see who's in charge, and it's easy to see that McClellan - who was dismissed one month later as commander of the Army of the Potomac - has an inkling of what lay in store for him. That photo was taken by famed Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2011
Twelve years ago, Walters Art Museum curator Will Noel opened a parcel and discovered what he calls "Archimedes' brain in a box. " Thus began a search for buried treasure — in this case, the lost writings of Archimedes of Syracuse, a famed Greek mathematician and inventor who lived in the third century B.C. Noel and his boss, museum director Gary Vikan, found a 174-page book made of cured goatskin that was ugly beyond belief. The sheaves were singed around the edges, the text and pages were defaced by water stains, and mold had eaten away entire sections.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | June 17, 1999
Peter Paul Rubens, Anthony van Dyck and others are featured in "An Eye for Detail," an exhibition of 67 small Dutch and Flemish paintings from a private collector that opens Sunday at the Walters Art Gallery.The show is designed to allow visitors to enjoy these "small marvels" in an intimate setting. The tiny still lifes, landscapes, portraits and genre scenes, some no larger than a postcard, are crafted with a precision that is at once engrossing and pleasing to the eye.Also opening Sunday at the Walters is "Eureka!
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October 6, 2011
The Maryland Brewer's Oktoberfest will happen this year Saturday, Oct. 8, noon-6 p.m., at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium. This event, which is celebrating its 10th year, will feature over 80 beers, including 15 from area breweries. There will also be all sorts of German food as well as a host of competitions, such as a Carry Your Wife Contest, a Miss Oktoberfest Contest, and a Beer Belly Contest. Admission runs $15-$35. Call 800-830-3976. Festive boating A four-day boat festival known as the Trawler Fest will take place Thursday-Sunday, Oct. 6-9, in the Inner Harbor's Rash Field/BMC Inner Harbor Marine Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | September 3, 2009
It's among the most iconic images of the Civil War. President Abraham Lincoln and Gen. George B. McClellan are conferring at a table erected beneath a tent a few weeks after the Battle of Antietam. McClellan looks both weary and worried. He leans forward slightly as Lincoln leans back. It's easy to see who's in charge, and it's easy to see that McClellan - who was dismissed one month later as commander of the Army of the Potomac - has an inkling of what lay in store for him. That photo was taken by famed Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | August 4, 2006
Experts at the Walters Art Museum have taken the Archimedes Palimpsest to Stanford University in California in an effort to decipher some of the prized document's detail with a particle accelerator. A Webcast is planned for 7 p.m. today to announce the latest findings. Researchers at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory are using X-ray fluorescence to decode the ancient text. The process takes advantage of iron in the ink used by the ancient scribe who copied Archimedes' work onto parchment.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
Using space-age tools to peer beneath the ink of a 12th-century prayer book, scientists in Maryland have discovered an even more ancient treasure - the only known copy in its original Greek of a work by the scientist Archimedes. The text, called "On Floating Bodies," is a medieval copy of the treatise first penned by Archimedes in the third century B.C. It had been erased and overwritten by monks in the 12th century, creating a twice-used parchment book known as a "palimpsest." Two teams of scientists, one from the Johns Hopkins University, have been working on the "Archimedes Palimpsest" since January, laboring to reveal the obliterated text with modern imaging technologies developed for medicine and space research.
FEATURES
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
Will Noel knows a treasure when he sees it. Lately he has been like a man just put down in Ali Baba's cave.The treasure Noel is contemplating these days is a thousand-year-old book, containing ideas that go even deeper in time. It is the most important ancient text ever to fall into the care of the Walters Art Gallery, where Noel is curator of manuscripts and rare books.It is a "palimpsest," a twice-used book. The Archimedes Palimpsest.The original texts in the book were inscribed in Greek in the 10th century, probably in Constantinople while it was still a capital of the Christian world, and before it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453 and became a capital of the Islamic world.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1998
At the Johns Hopkins University, you're more likely to find someone who has won a Nobel Prize than a prestigious award for teaching well. So what is Lawrence Principe doing picking up the Maryland Professor of the Year award from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching?"
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November 3, 2011
Submit notices via email: messenger@patuxent.com ; fax: 410-332-6336; or mail: Baltimore Messenger, 501 N. Calvert St., Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21278. Include sponsor or host, date, time, address of event, contact name and phone number. Deadline is noon the Thursday before publication. Arts and Museums The Walters Art Museum - 600 N. Charles St. 410-547-9000, http://www.thewalters.org. • Drop-in Art Activities: Text Messages, every Saturday and Sunday in November, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free.
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