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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 11, 1994
The Fonz as Rush Limbaugh.Who but those wacky folks at Fox -- the ones who brought us Chevy Chase as a comatose late-night host -- could have come up with this concept?"
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Susan Reimer | June 5, 2013
I think Edith Bunker did more to liberate the caged American housewife than Betty Friedan ever did. The author of "The Feminine Mystique" is the one who identified the nameless dissatisfaction of women at home with the kids and the kitchen chores. But it was Archie Bunker's wife, Edith - so memorably portrayed by Jean Stapleton, who died last week at 90 - who brought it home, literally. "All in The Family" was the most popular show on network television for years in the 1970s - back in the days of appointment television, when families gathered together to watch their favorite shows.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 22, 2001
Carroll O'Connor, whose brilliant work in the 1970s as Archie Bunker gave American television its first working-class character of any substance and relevance, died of a heart attack yesterday at Brotman Medical Center in Los Angeles. The Emmy Award-winning actor was 76 and his wife Nancy was by his side. O'Connor, who attended college in Ireland and began his acting on the stage in Dublin, appeared in 28 films and more than 90 television programs before arriving in America's living rooms on Jan. 12, 1971, as the cantankerous loading dock foreman at Prendergast Tool and Die. Television was never the same once we let Archie into our homes, and many of us would not have allowed that to happen had a less gifted actor been in the role.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | July 6, 2006
Comptroller William Donald Schaefer rekindled controversy over his views on immigrants and his behavior toward women yesterday as he denounced spending to teach English as a second language and addressed a reporter who questioned him as a "sweet little girl." The comptroller, who is seeking re-election, also ruled out debating his opponents in the Democratic primary. Of one of them, Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens, the former governor said he "wouldn't debate her on how to bake a chocolate cake."
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 27, 2001
How many towns the size of York can boast one of the most famous mayors in America? When Secretary Powell makes an impassioned sermon on AIDS to the U.N., the converts he seeks are his colleagues in D.C. The Senator Theatre is endanged, agreed. But by what is another matter. Carroll O'Connor was not was Archie Bunker. O'Connor was an actor. He died. Bunker is a mentality. It will live forever.
NEWS
By Phil Perrier | June 26, 2001
LOS ANGELES - The opening strains of Edith and Archie Bunker singing "Those were the Days" on an out-of-tune piano are as indelibly etched on my childhood as the sound of my father's voice or the smell of Playdough. Carroll O'Connor's creation of Archie gave us the most challenging character we had seen. Archie was someone we could love and hate in the same 30 minutes. Archie was a lot like us. I loved him - not his racism or his misogyny, just Archie. In a time of self-conscious hipness, Archie was a pie in the face.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 17, 1991
Los Angeles"At first, I said it can't be done, because the memory of the show is too pure and respected," Mary Tyler Moore said yesterday. "But now I'm all for it."Mary's coming back. So is Lou. So is Archie, Edith and Meathead, too.CBS yesterday rolled out its February "sweeps" ratings strategy: reunions and retrospectives of shows that have earned a spot in our national memory.On Feb. 16, CBS will air the "All In The Family 20th Anniversary Special." On Feb. 17, Carol Burnett will host "The Very Best of The Ed Sullivan Show," and on Feb. 18, the network will offer "Mary Tyler Moore: The 20th Anniversary Show."
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 9, 2006
Tim Burton's Corpse Bride [Warner] $29 The iconoclastic director teams up with muse Johnny Depp for this quirky stop-motion animated film about a shy young man who finds himself in the underworld, where he is betrothed to a corpse bride. Music is by Danny Elfman. The DVD doesn't include commentary from Burton, but the documentaries that explore the lavish production are a cut above the norm. Hill Street Blues: The Complete First Season [Fox] $40 The groundbreaking 1981-1987 NBC drama scored 98 Emmy nominations, receiving eight awards in its first season.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 11, 1994
Let it rest already, Norman. Let it rest.You don't need me to tell you that "All in the Family" and Archie Bunker were landmark TV when they arrived in 1971. Your formula launched a thousand spinoffs, such as "Maude," "Sanford and Son" and "The Jeffersons." You practically owned prime time.But somebody needs to say that your recent attempts to revisit the well just aren't making it."Sunday Dinner" three years ago -- strike one."The Powers That Be" two years ago -- strike two.And, now, "704 Hauser," which debuts tonight on CBS -- steeeerike three and yer out of there, Norman.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2000
Old-fashioned in the best sense of the word, "Return to Me" is a little heart-warmer of a film that keeps threatening to turn into a trite Hallmark valentine. But some old acting pros in supporting roles, and the sure hand of first-time director Bonnie Hunt, keep it from crossing over into so-cute-I-can't-stand-it territory. Bob Rueland (David Duchovny) is an architect whose latest project is designing a new gorilla house for the zoo where his wife, Elizabeth (Joely Richardson), works.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 9, 2006
Tim Burton's Corpse Bride [Warner] $29 The iconoclastic director teams up with muse Johnny Depp for this quirky stop-motion animated film about a shy young man who finds himself in the underworld, where he is betrothed to a corpse bride. Music is by Danny Elfman. The DVD doesn't include commentary from Burton, but the documentaries that explore the lavish production are a cut above the norm. Hill Street Blues: The Complete First Season [Fox] $40 The groundbreaking 1981-1987 NBC drama scored 98 Emmy nominations, receiving eight awards in its first season.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 28, 2002
When Susie Davis learned that Bill Bateman's Bistro in Clarksville was for sale, she decided that this was her chance to have her own restaurant in upscale River Hill. Enter Luna-C Grille. Davis opened the restaurant without advertising, and it has been packing them in since its debut on New Year's Eve. "No one should know that we are open, but everybody does because of word of mouth," she said. "We have an hour wait on Friday and Saturday nights." The restaurant has customers coming from Baltimore to enjoy the creations of executive chef Jennifer Moeller, who previously owned Wild Mushroom in Baltimore.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 27, 2001
How many towns the size of York can boast one of the most famous mayors in America? When Secretary Powell makes an impassioned sermon on AIDS to the U.N., the converts he seeks are his colleagues in D.C. The Senator Theatre is endanged, agreed. But by what is another matter. Carroll O'Connor was not was Archie Bunker. O'Connor was an actor. He died. Bunker is a mentality. It will live forever.
NEWS
By Phil Perrier | June 26, 2001
LOS ANGELES - The opening strains of Edith and Archie Bunker singing "Those were the Days" on an out-of-tune piano are as indelibly etched on my childhood as the sound of my father's voice or the smell of Playdough. Carroll O'Connor's creation of Archie gave us the most challenging character we had seen. Archie was someone we could love and hate in the same 30 minutes. Archie was a lot like us. I loved him - not his racism or his misogyny, just Archie. In a time of self-conscious hipness, Archie was a pie in the face.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 22, 2001
Carroll O'Connor, whose brilliant work in the 1970s as Archie Bunker gave American television its first working-class character of any substance and relevance, died of a heart attack yesterday at Brotman Medical Center in Los Angeles. The Emmy Award-winning actor was 76 and his wife Nancy was by his side. O'Connor, who attended college in Ireland and began his acting on the stage in Dublin, appeared in 28 films and more than 90 television programs before arriving in America's living rooms on Jan. 12, 1971, as the cantankerous loading dock foreman at Prendergast Tool and Die. Television was never the same once we let Archie into our homes, and many of us would not have allowed that to happen had a less gifted actor been in the role.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2000
Old-fashioned in the best sense of the word, "Return to Me" is a little heart-warmer of a film that keeps threatening to turn into a trite Hallmark valentine. But some old acting pros in supporting roles, and the sure hand of first-time director Bonnie Hunt, keep it from crossing over into so-cute-I-can't-stand-it territory. Bob Rueland (David Duchovny) is an architect whose latest project is designing a new gorilla house for the zoo where his wife, Elizabeth (Joely Richardson), works.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | February 16, 1991
TelevisionTrip down memory laneOne show was a raucous breakaway from convention, while the other was television's last regular gasp of the vaudeville stage, and both are getting attention on CBS this weekend. At 8 tonight (Channel 11) comes the "All in the Family 20th Anniversary," with highlights of the social satire series which in 1971 gave us Archie Bunker (Carroll O'Connor), "Dingbat" Edith (Jean Stapleton), "Meathead" Michael (Rob Reiner) and all the rest. And at 9 p.m. tomorrow, "The Very Best of the Ed Sullivan Show" brings back Old Stoneface and some of the "reealy big shews" he provided for 23 years.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Evening Sun Staff | October 21, 1991
In an office in Baltimore, a boss pats his secretary below her waist, and convinces himself that the woman welcomed the attention.Elsewhere in the city, a supervisor tells a lewd joke to a female worker, and secretly enjoys seeing her cringe with embarrassment.A third boss is more blatant in revealing his sexism. A woman who spurns his advances is called into his private office, pawed and threatened with firing unless she gives in.Why do some men harass women at work? Psychologists say the cases range from mischievous Archie Bunker behavior to vicious aggression, and the motives are as complex as male sexuality itself.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 11, 1994
Let it rest already, Norman. Let it rest.You don't need me to tell you that "All in the Family" and Archie Bunker were landmark TV when they arrived in 1971. Your formula launched a thousand spinoffs, such as "Maude," "Sanford and Son" and "The Jeffersons." You practically owned prime time.But somebody needs to say that your recent attempts to revisit the well just aren't making it."Sunday Dinner" three years ago -- strike one."The Powers That Be" two years ago -- strike two.And, now, "704 Hauser," which debuts tonight on CBS -- steeeerike three and yer out of there, Norman.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 11, 1994
The Fonz as Rush Limbaugh.Who but those wacky folks at Fox -- the ones who brought us Chevy Chase as a comatose late-night host -- could have come up with this concept?"
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