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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
The deer hunting archery season began in Maryland on Friday, Sept. 6, and will run through Jan. 31. There are two seasons for muzzleloading: an early mid-October (Oct. 17-19) and a late season from Dec. 21 to Jan. 4. The firearm season will run from Nov. 30 to Dec. 14 and again in Region B only Jan. 10-11. The statewide bag limit allows hunters one antlered whitetail deer per season, with a bonus antlered deer allowed in Region B in the season of the hunter's choice. There is also an unlimited number of antlerless deer allowed taken in Region B with archery equipment, and hunters can take up to 10 antlerless deer in each of the other seasons.
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By Marissa Laliberte and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
At the sound of two whistles, Matthew Bitner-Parish sets up at the shooting line. After another whistle, he draws his bow and stands still, eyes focused on the target 70 meters away. On a crisp fall day, Bitner-Parish trains during one of his biweekly practices on a field outside Ridgely Middle School in Lutherville-Timonium. A soccer practice is underway on an adjacent field, and neighborhood residents stroll past on a sidewalk up the hill. When he finally shoots, the string snaps back with a thud as the arrow takes off. It's another bull's-eye.
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By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
Four-year-old Meg Bittinger can check one item off her wish list thanks to the Howard County Recreation and Parks Department: She is learning to use a bow and arrow like her idol, Princess Merida, the heroine of the 2012 Disney movie "Brave. " Amy Bittinger, who lives in Elkridge, said her daughter "is really into princesses, but I want her to have a diversity of interests. " Archery lessons would please both of them, she reasoned, and so she became the first to register her child for the February session of Lil' Archers, an introductory class for 4- and 5-year-olds that uses rubber-tipped arrows.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
When Mike Leiter practices archery at the Harford Bowmen club at Susquehanna State Park, it might not appear he is having fun. Leiter, one of the most successful archers in the country, is a quiet person, especially when practicing. Each shot, even when he's not at the club and is just practicing at his home in Fallston, is a slow process. He draws the bow back deliberately and takes several seconds to line up his shot. After the release, Leiter's stoic face doesn't change, even if he knows it was a bull's-eye.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Staff Writer | September 29, 1992
Jennifer Quinn is a typical sixth-grader. She enjoys school and parties, and has discovered she has a flair for art. She is also pretty handy with a bow and arrow.A bow and arrow?Meet Jennifer Quinn, 11-year-old state archery champion."I've tried other things," said Jennifer, a student at Mayfield Woods Middle School. "My dad tried to teach me how to play golf, but I was terrible. Then we tried tennis, and that was OK. I tried basketball at school. That was all right. Then I tried this."About a year ago, Jennifer's father, Michael, asked her if she'd like to give archery a try. Michael, a novice at the time, had been competing in archery tournaments for about six months.
NEWS
By MICHELLE HOFFMAN | August 12, 1993
An archer for 15 years, Shane Fitzgerald's love of the sport motivated him to open his own archery store two years ago.The Bowhunter's Den, at 12 E. Baltimore St. in Taneytown, has grown from a small supply store to a full-service business, offering archery equipment, supplies and repair.One wall of the store is adorned with trophies, plaques, ribbons and pins he has won in local and national shoots. A second wall displays an arrow split by another arrow. It is a public showcase of his talent.
NEWS
By Marie V. Forbes | July 24, 1991
When writing about archers and archery, reporters have a tendency torefer to their subjects as "latter-day Robin Hoods."In writing about Todd Kibler of Finksburg, however, the image that springs to mind is that of Robin's loyal and gentle sidekick, Little John.John, if you remember your mythology, was a giant of a man whose ability with a quarterstaff was every bit as great as that of the more flamboyant Robin.The 26-year-old Kibler goes John one better bybeing Robin's equal with bow and arrow.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Contributing writer | August 4, 1991
At 8 a.m. on a recent Tuesday morning, Meredith Lathbury stood at the 30-yard marker of the Anne Arundel Archers in Crofton.It already was 85 degrees on a day when temperatures were projected to soar above 100. As the left-hander raised her 35-pound bow to a point just below her left cheekbone, perspiration began to form on her face, causing the strands of her wavy, shoulder-length blond hair to clump.Undaunted by the intense heat, Lathbury, a 1989 graduate of Atholton High, stared down the 12-inch-long sight, which extends outward and at eye level toward the target.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff writer | July 23, 1991
At 8 a.m. yesterday, Meredith Lathbury stood at the 30-yard marker of the Anne Arundel Archer's in Crofton.It already was 85 degrees on a day when temperatures were projected to soar above 100. As the left-hander raised her 35-pound bow to a point just below her left cheekbone, perspiration began to form on her face, causing the strands of her wavy, shoulder-length blond hair to clump.Undaunted by the intense heat, Lathbury stared down the 12-inch-long sight, which extends outward and at eye level toward the target.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | September 2, 2007
To watch two dozen Bhutanese men celebrate Baltimorean Pema Tango's bowmanship yesterday is to understand why the tiny Himalayan kingdom -- where archery is the national sport -- aspires not to wealth but to Gross National Happiness. Ecstatic whoops and hollers rang out as soon as Tango's arrow somehow found the tiny wooden target about 150 yards away. Play was suspended so that the park ranger's teammates could form a circle, singing and dancing in his honor for several minutes. For his part, a beaming Tango couldn't have looked happier if he had won Friday's Mega Millions drawing.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
Four-year-old Meg Bittinger can check one item off her wish list thanks to the Howard County Recreation and Parks Department: She is learning to use a bow and arrow like her idol, Princess Merida, the heroine of the 2012 Disney movie "Brave. " Amy Bittinger, who lives in Elkridge, said her daughter "is really into princesses, but I want her to have a diversity of interests. " Archery lessons would please both of them, she reasoned, and so she became the first to register her child for the February session of Lil' Archers, an introductory class for 4- and 5-year-olds that uses rubber-tipped arrows.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
The deer hunting archery season began in Maryland on Friday, Sept. 6, and will run through Jan. 31. There are two seasons for muzzleloading: an early mid-October (Oct. 17-19) and a late season from Dec. 21 to Jan. 4. The firearm season will run from Nov. 30 to Dec. 14 and again in Region B only Jan. 10-11. The statewide bag limit allows hunters one antlered whitetail deer per season, with a bonus antlered deer allowed in Region B in the season of the hunter's choice. There is also an unlimited number of antlerless deer allowed taken in Region B with archery equipment, and hunters can take up to 10 antlerless deer in each of the other seasons.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Dansicker | March 5, 2013
If watching Katniss fire off arrows in “The Hunger Games” made you yearn for a bow of your own, a trip to Churchville and a visit with George Bennett of Deer Creek Archery may be in your future.  Bennett was a builder by trade, but as he neared retirement, he decided to change gears and opened Deer Creek Archery in 1995. Now, almost 17 years later, at the age of 70, Bennett is taking advantage of the renewed national interest in archery. “The popularity of the sport has risen in the last few years especially with 'The Hunger Games,' and it is being introduced in schools across the country,” says Bennett.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
John Leck will never forget the look on the face of the paralyzed boy sitting in his wheelchair. When the arrow left the bow that had been strapped onto the eighth-grader's arm, a mixture of wonder and excitement was apparent as he watched it sail toward the target inside the gymnasium at Rocky Hill Middle School in Clarksburg. "It was really cool," Leck, a science teacher at the Montgomery County school, recalled one day last week. "It showed him something that he didn't think he could do. " The student, who had been paralyzed months before in an automobile accident, was taking part in an in-school archery program that had been introduced in Maryland in 2005.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | October 7, 2012
For years, archery has been a part of Westminster resident Vicki Clem's life. But Clem, 71, who taught French in the Howard County public school system for 39 years, got started back in 1981, in a somewhat back-handed way - she simply got tired of watching other people compete on the archery range. "My son and ex-husband had gotten into archery, and I used to take my son up to the Mayberry Archers, here in Westminster, to compete," said Clem, whose son, Tony, now lives in Colorado and competes in professional archery competitions.
SPORTS
August 1, 2012
Hooked on vault Nick Sortal Sun Sentinel I don't care about the stories of teenage girls who gave up their whole life for a few moments wearing a sparkly outfit and smiling for millions on TV. But I do care about the athletics. And that's why this year I'm addicted to the women's vault. If it's not the most athletically challenging Olympic sport, it's the most underrated. First is a sprint, then a roundoff onto a springboard, then a dive onto the horse, then twists and flips that rival divers.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
Channel 2 meteorologist Norm Lewis steps into the brightly lighted room, takes a deep breath and narrows his focus. For the next several minutes, accuracy is the only thing on his mind. Working methodically, Lewis delivers -- not a forecast, but a quiver full of arrows. And while his TV delivery has earned him fans, his archery prowess has brought national and regional recognition in the past year. Lewis, 56, is the outdoor national champion in his age group and shooting style. Last month, he finished second in his class and style in the indoor world and national championships held jointly in Tulsa, Okla.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2003
Hank Welling always has liked hunting. At 41, he still has shotguns going back to his teen-age years when he was living on a farm on the Howard County side of Sykesville, not far from where he lives today. Always looking to improve his skills, Welling began playing around with archery about three years ago. He said he accompanied friends on several archery shoots, and has since become enamored with the hunting bow and all that goes with it. He particularly enjoys "3-D shooting," which simulates hunting situations instead of requiring shooters to aim at a formal target from a given distance.
SPORTS
By Ryanne Milani, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
Suzanne Collins'"The Hunger Games" trilogy has sold millions of copies in the United States since the first book was published in 2008. Now, with the release of the blockbuster movie of the same name, the series has achieved even more: It has influenced kids to spend more time outside. Two weekends ago, 13 young "Hunger Games" fans braved the rain to learn about archery. The Saturday event, which was hosted by the Thurmont Regional Library and run by members of the Tuscarora Archers, allowed the teenagers to learn how to shoot a bow. "[It]
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
Kari Kephart grew up as a competitive runner, good enough to win state championships in the two-mile event and in cross country at North Hagerstown High as well as a conference title while on scholarship at Mount St. Mary's. The only things Kephart hunted for in those days were medals and trophies. That changed when she met and married her husband, Jason Kephart, an avid hunter for most of his life who combined his passion with his profession as a taxidermist. When I met him, it was, 'Oh, really, you hunt?
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