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NEWS
April 4, 2002
The 37th Spring Symposium on Archaeology is scheduled for April 13 at the People's Resource Center, 100 Community Place, Crownsville. The event is sponsored by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development's Office of Archeology and the Archeological Society of Maryland. Speakers will discuss a variety of topics, including the development of public archaeology in Western Maryland and plans for interpreting the St. John's site at St. Mary's City. Registration begins at 9 a.m. The cost is $4 for members of the Archaeological Society of Maryland, $6 for nonmembers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
The just-completed Performing Arts and Humanities Building atop the campus of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, makes quite a statement from almost every angle — the sun-reflecting, stainless-steel-wrapped Concert Hall; the glass-enclosed Dance Cube jutting from the structure; views of the downtown Baltimore skyline from upper floors. Phase one of the project was finished two years ago; phase two wrapped up in time for this week's start of UMBC's academic year. The $160 million, environmentally conscious edifice brings together under one roof (painted white for maximum reflection and energy savings)
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EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | November 25, 2011
Digging into the past can be an intriguing and enlightening experience. But when it involves slogging for hours through shin-deep mud and frigid water on a chilly November morning, it might tend to dampen the intrigue and stifle the enlightenment a little bit. Not so for a dozen or so students from New Windsor Middle School who, on a recent Saturday morning, participated in an ongoing archaeological dig at one of New Windsor's landmarks, its...
NEWS
By Cheryl Clemens | June 10, 2014
Forget popsicle-stick art and freeze tag. So many of today's summer camps are unique, a camper could spend every week of the summer at a new one and never repeat an activity. Over the next three months, Howard County Recreation and Parks will hold more than 300 camps for toddlers to teenagers ranging in themes from rock climbing, chess and musical theater to skate boarding, robotics and cooking. More than 13,000 campers are expected to register this year, more than a third of the county's camps already had waiting lists by early May. “It can be hard to keep up with the demand,” said Dawn Thomas, the county's adventure, nature and outdoor recreation manager.
NEWS
By NICK SHIELDS and NICK SHIELDS,SUN REPORTER | January 30, 2006
Gladys Joy Justice, a soprano soloist and archaeology lecturer, died of liver cancer Saturday at her Parkville home. She was 73. Born and raised in East Baltimore, Gladys Joy Spangler began singing at 6 years old. Her career blossomed in 1959 when her award for winning a music contest was a guest soloist appearance with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. It would be the first of nine appearances with the Baltimore Symphony, said her husband, George Justice. She sang at churches throughout Maryland and at hundreds of weddings in Maryland, Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
NEWS
By Louise Akerson and Louise Akerson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 2000
When you think of an archaeological site, do you think of places such as Egypt, Rome and Greece? Most people do, but archaeological sites are found worldwide. If you live in Howard County, you live near more than 200 such sites. Archaeology is the systematic study and interpretation of the physical remains of past human cultures. Sites that contain artifacts that existed before there was a written record - before our county was settled by European, African and Asian people, for example - are known as "prehistoric sites."
TRAVEL
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 27, 2005
Discover the arts of Veracruz, Puebla and Tlaxcala on a cultural tour that begins Jan. 12. The 11-night tour focuses on the art, archaeology and history of the region, east of Mexico City. "We see archaeological sites, and we see a lot of different types of art - from ancient pre-Columbian to cutting-edge," said tour leader Jean Grimm. In Veracruz, the group will tour the fortress of San Juan de Ulza and trace the trail of Hernando Cortes, the Spanish explorer who landed there in 1519.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard M. Sudhalter and By Richard M. Sudhalter,Special to the Sun | August 18, 2002
The First Americans, by J.M. Adovasio with Jake Page. Random House. 352 pages. $25.95. James M. Adovasio's subtitle for The First Americans is In Pursuit of Archaeology's Greatest Mystery. But he might more accurately have called it, "A broadside against those who seek to discredit my theories of American antiquity." His target, and context, is the so-called Clovis theory of how the Americas were first populated. In brief, it holds that 1930s discoveries at Clovis, N.M., a small town near the Texas border, place the earliest North American dwellers here some 10,000-11,000 years ago. Arriving from Siberia via the 90-mile Bering land (or sea)
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | July 20, 1993
Out of the dirt of generations past come a cup handle, a glass bottle with a stick for a stopper, bone chunks and pieces of a dish that can be fit together to reveal a 19th-century china pattern.Along with lots of rocks and a few bricks, these are the first-day's take for a small group of fledgling archaeologists, digging in a hot plot of earth at Oregon Ridge Park and, subsequently, into the lives of those who lived nearby over the last 150 years.These youngsters are learning not only about archaeology and history, but also about thinking and how to do so more clearly and with more complexity.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2004
All summer under the Annapolis sun, Maisha Washington taught archaeology and history techniques to two dozen African-American children -- secretly hoping that digging into the past will inspire a few of them to choose a future in one of those fields. "We need to broaden the career options we give our children," said Washington, the education administrator at the Banneker-Douglass Museum, which sponsored the program for low-income youths with the University of Maryland. Yesterday, in a carriage house overlooking the historic Paca House garden on the last class day, Washington said the program already had produced results.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  BALLYHOO Living as we do in a culture of promotion, self-promotion, exaggeration, and sensationalism, it is good that we have a fine old American word, both noun and verb, to apply to the phenomenon. Ballyhoo  (pronounced BAL-ee-hoo) is ever so much more colorful and evocative than hype , the clipped, gray, featureless word more commonly in use today.  The etymological origins are obscure and the subject of much fanciful speculation,* but the various authorities agree that ballyhoo emerged in the United States around 1900, perhaps as the spiel of carnival barkers trying to draw customers to a performance.
NEWS
July 26, 2013
Sunday, July 28 Water works Swimmable Action Day will be held at several locations, including Mayo Beach Park, Edgewater, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Swim and kayak on the bay to celebrate the need for clean water. The event is sponsored by the South River Federation. 410-224-3802. Tuesday, July 30 Navy band The Naval Academy Band hosts a concert at Susan G. Campbell Park at the City Dock in Annapolis at 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 31 Lecture Shilo Brooks, a professor of philosophy at Bowdoin College in Maine, will deliver a lecture, "Nietzsche, Hegel, and the Problem of History," at 7:30 p.m. at St. John's College's Francis Scott Key Auditorium, 60 College Ave. in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2013
William D. "Bill" Evans, a retired National Security Agency linguist who also maintained an interest in archaeology, died Wednesday of cancer at his Arnold home. He was 85. William David Evans was born in Midway, Ky., and later moved with his family to Bethesda. During World War II, he served with an infantry unit, and after the end of the war, entered the University of Maryland on the G.I. Bill, where he earned his law degree. Mr. Evans went to work for the NSA in 1954 and later learned Russian and Bulgarian, family members said.
FEATURES
David Driver | February 8, 2013
Summer break finds many kids sleeping in, riding bikes and splashing in the pool. But it's not every day you come across a pastime like Autumn Boit's. “Yesterday I skipped lunch to clean artifacts,” the Ellicott City fourth-grader declared on a humid August morning at Robinson Nature Center. The nature center, which opened in Columbia in the fall of 2011, held its first series of summer camps in 2012 - including Autumn's “Digging Up the Past” archaeology camp. With 18 forested acres, Robinson Nature Center is full of ways to keep children engaged during the summer.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Archaeologists have discovered what they think are remains of a barn or blacksmith workshop in North Bethesda that could date to the days of Josiah Henson, a former slave whose autobiography inspired the novel "Uncle Tom's Cabin. " Looking for evidence of what slave life in Maryland was like, archaeologists with the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission Montgomery Parks and the PBS program "Time Team America" began exploring the Josiah Henson Special Park on Monday.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | November 25, 2011
Digging into the past can be an intriguing and enlightening experience. But when it involves slogging for hours through shin-deep mud and frigid water on a chilly November morning, it might tend to dampen the intrigue and stifle the enlightenment a little bit. Not so for a dozen or so students from New Windsor Middle School who, on a recent Saturday morning, participated in an ongoing archaeological dig at one of New Windsor's landmarks, its...
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
With TV regularly blamed for shortening attention spans and eroding any sense of national history, who would think it could be used to engage a mass audience in the archaeology of America's past? PBS, that's who, and you have to admire public television for the bold thinking behind Time Team America, a new series that digs deep into America's roots starting at 8 p.m. Wednesday 8 on MPT. +For one thing, the producers went with a 27-year-old artist with absolutely no TV experience as host of the program.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2010
Nine large white vessels hover like clouds above the atrium of a recently restored landmark on the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus. The vessels are shaped like vases or Greek amphorae, but they aren't made of clay or porcelain. Instead, they were fabricated with powder-coated steel frames covered by South African shade cloth. The vessels created by Virginia sculptor Kendall Buster help call attention to Baltimore's newest cultural attraction, the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2011
Three years of digging at a prehistoric Indian site in Anne Arundel County has unearthed the oldest structures and human habitations in Maryland and is making this bluff above the Patuxent River one of the most important archaeological sites in the Mid-Atlantic. Last week, archaeologists learned from carbon-14 dating that a stone hearth they uncovered this summer was last used 9,290 years ago. That makes the site, called Pig Point, twice as old as the earliest carbon-dated human habitation found previously in Maryland.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Local archaeologists have not only confirmed that Baltimore's Lafayette Square Park was once the stomping ground of a Civil War army barracks, but they also dug up a little-known fact about the soldiers who dwelled there: They had a knack for losing buttons. On Sunday, volunteers who joined the Baltimore Heritage and Archaeological Society of Maryland in searching for remnants at the former Union army encampment ended a three-day quest of exploring the park's history in the 19th century.
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