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By Frank D. Roylance | July 8, 2011
Volunteer archaeologists are descending on leafy Lafayette Square in West Baltimore this weekend in an effort to uncover relics from Camp Hoffman, a Union army encampment that stood there during the Civil War. Just hours into the project Friday, while dodging rain showers and swarms of June bugs, the diggers had already turned up fragments of mid-19th-century tableware and decorative wrought iron, nails, birdshot and even a piece of an old pocket watch....
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HEALTH
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The tiny brass ring bearing the initials "CC" presents a mystery: Did it belong to Charles Calvert, the third Baron Baltimore? And can the St. Mary's College of Maryland archaeologists who unearthed it ever prove its origins? The archaeologists discovered the ring this summer at a dig at a Charles County site that was a refuge for Piscataway Indians who were pushed from their homelands by other tribes and the arrival of European settlers in the 1600s. The small ring, perhaps designed to be worn on a pinkie finger, might have been a signet ring used to seal documents, said Julia King, the St. Mary's professor who oversaw the dig. King believes the ring might have been used by a representative of Charles Calvert to conduct diplomatic relations with the Piscataway tribe.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Archaeologists conducting a dig in Patterson Park are holding an open house Saturday to share discoveries with the community. The project, organized by nonprofit Baltimore Heritage, is exploring an area in the northwest corner of the park, near the Pagoda, to unearth remnants of a War of 1812 camp there. The archaeologists will hold volunteer training from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. for those interested in participating in the dig, which began Wednesday and runs through May 15. They will be answering questions and showcasing findings from 9 a.m. to noon.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
For local archaeologists, the piece de resistance would be to find items that once belonged to Comte de Rochambeau, the French army commander during the American Revolution. He and 5,000 troops are said to have encamped at Belvoir-Scott's Plantation in Crownsville along Generals Highway, an area now being excavated by archaeologists as a partnership among the State Highway Administration, Anne Arundel County and Rockbridge Academy, the property owner. SHA officials said the highway between Interstate 97 and Annapolis has roots in the American Revolutionary War, the War of 1812 and the Civil War. Generals Highway was originally built in the early 18th century as a second post road between Williamsburg, Va., and Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2010
For months in the spring and summer of 1814, Commodore Joshua Barney and his ragtag flotilla of gunboats had harassed the mighty British navy on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. But outnumbered and outgunned, Barney and his miniature fleet were bottled up in the Patuxent River with no escape and enemy forces approaching. So following orders from Washington, Barney's men scuttled the estimated 17 vessels — including his flagship, the USS Scorpion — near a place known as Pig Point.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2014
Today it's best known for the pagoda, summertime jazz concerts and some of the city's best sledding. But an archaeological dig planned for Patterson Park's Hampstead Hill seeks to revive a largely forgotten 200-year-old story. While most know Fort McHenry's role in the Battle of Baltimore, thanks to Francis Scott Key and "The Star-Spangled Banner," few know or remember what transpired on the hill overlooking the harbor. Buried there could lie remnants of the trenches that helped Baltimore fend off advancing British land forces and end the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
For local archaeologists, the piece de resistance would be to find items that once belonged to Comte de Rochambeau, the French army commander during the American Revolution. He and 5,000 troops are said to have encamped at Belvoir-Scott's Plantation in Crownsville along Generals Highway, an area now being excavated by archaeologists as a partnership among the State Highway Administration, Anne Arundel County and Rockbridge Academy, the property owner. SHA officials said the highway between Interstate 97 and Annapolis has roots in the American Revolutionary War, the War of 1812 and the Civil War. Generals Highway was originally built in the early 18th century as a second post road between Williamsburg, Va., and Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | November 19, 1994
A fist-sized chunk of clear quartz that was just a curiosity when archaeologists found it eight years ago in Baltimore's Carroll Park is now being described as a relic of West African spiritual practices among Maryland slaves.Calling it "a window to the soul," Carroll Park Foundation officials and archaeologists unveiled the rock crystal yesterday at the park's Mount Clare Mansion, where it is now on display.The discovery "shows that people did hold values that were traditionally from their native [West African]
NEWS
By John Noble Wilford and John Noble Wilford,New York Times News Service | September 29, 1992
After all these centuries of calumny, the Philistines are finally having some good things said about them. They were not, it seems, deserving of that withering epithet: Philistine.Archaeologists are uncovering increasing evidence that the Philistines, arch foes of the Israelites in biblical times whose name became synonymous with barbarity and boorishness, were actually creators of fine pottery and grand architecture, clever urban planners and cosmopolitan devotees of the grape. If anything, the Israelites, at the time mostly shepherds and farmers in the hills, were the less-sophisticated and less-cultured folk.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | November 23, 1990
Archaeologists in Anne Arundel County are racing to excavate the remains of a remarkable 8,000- to 10,000-year-old Indian camp before looters destroy the site.The ancient tool-making camp, located in a northern section of the county, already has been badly damaged by an unidentified looter, who dug up huge mounds of dirt over several weeks this fall.Archaeologists called the damage the worst they've ever encountered."This man [the looter] was on his way to killing the last of an extinct species, the equivalent of shooting the last bull elephant, or the last bald eagle," said R. Christopher Goodwin, a Frederick archaeologist hired to salvage what artifacts and information remain buried at the camp.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
When Samuel Smith, major general of the Maryland militia, needed a headquarters to plot Baltimore's defense from British invaders in the summer of 1814, archaeologists believe he called on the owner of a shop that gives Butcher's Hill its name. Jacob Laudenslager leased much of what is Patterson Park today from landowner William Patterson, including a butcher's shop steps from where the park's iconic pagoda sits today. Archaeologists have uncovered a wall of that structure as they embark on a dig for a better understanding of what happened when thousands of militiamen camped along the hills of southeast Baltimore during the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Archaeologists conducting a dig in Patterson Park are holding an open house Saturday to share discoveries with the community. The project, organized by nonprofit Baltimore Heritage, is exploring an area in the northwest corner of the park, near the Pagoda, to unearth remnants of a War of 1812 camp there. The archaeologists will hold volunteer training from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. for those interested in participating in the dig, which began Wednesday and runs through May 15. They will be answering questions and showcasing findings from 9 a.m. to noon.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2014
Today it's best known for the pagoda, summertime jazz concerts and some of the city's best sledding. But an archaeological dig planned for Patterson Park's Hampstead Hill seeks to revive a largely forgotten 200-year-old story. While most know Fort McHenry's role in the Battle of Baltimore, thanks to Francis Scott Key and "The Star-Spangled Banner," few know or remember what transpired on the hill overlooking the harbor. Buried there could lie remnants of the trenches that helped Baltimore fend off advancing British land forces and end the War of 1812.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
An authentic Indiana Jones is alive and well, right here in town. Baltimore, meet Douglas Comer. Operating rather inconspicuously from his Charles Village-based firm Cultural Site Research and Management, Comer has overseen some of the region's most important archaeological and historical preservation projects. That's when he's not spur-of-the-moment globetrotting to a newly discovered archaeology site or to play watchdog over the preservation of some of the Earth's most-treasured archaeological finds.
EXPLORE
By Lane Page | April 2, 2012
He may not sport a fedora on his head or a bullwhip on his belt, but Lee Preston can be recognized by the ARKLOGIST license plate on his car. And by a book that might be tucked under his arm: “Archaeology in Howard County and Beyond: What I've learned in 40 Years about its People and Sites,” written by the man himself. Preston's opus was published last year under his full name, M. Lee Preston Jr., for the James and Anne Robinson Foundation (of the new Robinson Nature Center in Columbia)
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2011
Archaeologists in Southern Maryland say they have solved a mystery that has baffled historians since at least the 1930s. They say they have found Zekiah Fort. The fort was established in 1680 by Gov. Charles Calvert, the third Lord Baltimore, for the protection of the Piscataway people and other Maryland Indian groups that were the targets of raids by "foreign" Susquehannock and Seneca warriors from the north. Five weeks of digging this spring and summer, led by St. Mary's College of Maryland anthropologist Julia King, have turned up Indian pottery mixed with glass trade beads, arrowheads fashioned from English brass, gun parts and a silver belt hanger for an English sword.
NEWS
By Orange County Register | March 14, 1994
DOMENIGONI VALLEY, Calif. -- John Foster stood at the site of the 19th-century homestead of Angelo Domenigoni, the Italian-Swiss namesake of this scenic hollow destined to become Southern California's largest reservoir.Nearby, a half-dozen people dug into ground where Angelo's outhouse once stood."Most privies had about a 10-year life, at the end of which they were filled with trash," Mr. Foster, an archaeologist, said. "By looking at that, we can tell what people ate and drank, what medicines they took, all kinds of personal things about their lives."
NEWS
By Christina Dubitsky and Christina Dubitsky,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 9, 2000
WYOMING, Pa. - Two field archaeologists crouched in trenches in an old cornfield near the Eighth Street Bridge and scraped the earth with their trowels, looking for evidence of American Indians who may have been in the area. The archaeologists tested the area to see if the site could be included in the National Register of Historic Places. The testing must be done before the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation can use the land to build a new bridge. The preliminary testing is a "baby version of a dig," said archaeologist Jamie McIntyre.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2011
Three years of digging at a prehistoric Indian site in Anne Arundel County has unearthed the oldest structures and human habitations in Maryland and is making this bluff above the Patuxent River one of the most important archaeological sites in the Mid-Atlantic. Last week, archaeologists learned from carbon-14 dating that a stone hearth they uncovered this summer was last used 9,290 years ago. That makes the site, called Pig Point, twice as old as the earliest carbon-dated human habitation found previously in Maryland.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Local archaeologists have not only confirmed that Baltimore's Lafayette Square Park was once the stomping ground of a Civil War army barracks, but they also dug up a little-known fact about the soldiers who dwelled there: They had a knack for losing buttons. On Sunday, volunteers who joined the Baltimore Heritage and Archaeological Society of Maryland in searching for remnants at the former Union army encampment ended a three-day quest of exploring the park's history in the 19th century.
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