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By DENNIS O'BRIEN | June 23, 2006
Researchers say they have discovered the oldest beads ever used for decorative purposes - a finding that pushes back the date for the dawn of modern human culture by 25,000 years. Detailed analysis of beads made from mollusk shells that were dug up years ago in Israel and Algeria show that they were probably hand carved about 100,000 years ago, researchers say. They also are similar to beads believed to be about 75,000 years old that were discovered several years ago. They were at an archaeological site known as the Blombos Cave on the coast of the Indian Ocean in South Africa.
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TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
An authentic Indiana Jones is alive and well, right here in town. Baltimore, meet Douglas Comer. Operating rather inconspicuously from his Charles Village-based firm Cultural Site Research and Management, Comer has overseen some of the region's most important archaeological and historical preservation projects. That's when he's not spur-of-the-moment globetrotting to a newly discovered archaeology site or to play watchdog over the preservation of some of the Earth's most-treasured archaeological finds.
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NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | May 11, 1992
JERUSALEM -- Elie Borowski pleaded with his Jewish parents to flee Poland from the Nazi invasion in 1939. They scoffed at the young man's warnings.He left alone and volunteered to fight in the French army. When his family was devoured in the tempest of the war, he vowed to find a way to combat hatred for his people with understanding of their culture.His solution opens today in Jerusalem, where a fortune in biblical antiquities the wealthy art dealer personally collected over 45 years goes on display in a new museum he built.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
A divided Board of Public Works gave wrecking crews the green light Wednesday to demolish the 55-year-old home of the president of the University of Maryland, College Park to make way for a $7.2 million building that will serve as a residence and a location for large events. The board voted 2-1 to allow the College Park Foundation to move forward with its plans to replace the home, with Comptroller Peter Franchot opposed. Foundation officials contend that the existing 1956 structure is obsolete, hasn't been renovated since 1991 and could not meet contemporary building or safety codes.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | January 8, 1993
Burned by the British and smothered over time by tons of earth, an 18th-century shipyard that was the scene of Anne Arundel County's only Revolutionary War land battle faces a new threat from suburban sprawl.Developers are gobbling up the peninsula at the headwaters of the West River south of Galesville, near the Methodist Church Camp. It would be a tragedy if the historic Stephen Steward shipyard, burned by British raiders in 1781, were gobbled up too, said Michael Cassidy, a member of the West River Federation.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
An authentic Indiana Jones is alive and well, right here in town. Baltimore, meet Douglas Comer. Operating rather inconspicuously from his Charles Village-based firm Cultural Site Research and Management, Comer has overseen some of the region's most important archaeological and historical preservation projects. That's when he's not spur-of-the-moment globetrotting to a newly discovered archaeology site or to play watchdog over the preservation of some of the Earth's most-treasured archaeological finds.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2009
Age: 39 Salary: $85,000 Years on the job: 2 1/2 How she got started: : Growing up in Minnesota, Julie Schablitsky first became interested in archaeology at the age of seven when she discovered fossils in the limestone of her gravel driveway. She went on her first dig at the age of 15 and at the age of 18 began working as an archaeologist in the Midwest for the National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service during the summers. She received a bachelor's degree from the University of Minnesota in anthropology and a master's degree from Oregon State University in anthropology.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
A divided Board of Public Works gave wrecking crews the green light Wednesday to demolish the 55-year-old home of the president of the University of Maryland, College Park to make way for a $7.2 million building that will serve as a residence and a location for large events. The board voted 2-1 to allow the College Park Foundation to move forward with its plans to replace the home, with Comptroller Peter Franchot opposed. Foundation officials contend that the existing 1956 structure is obsolete, hasn't been renovated since 1991 and could not meet contemporary building or safety codes.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | January 18, 2006
ARLINGTON, VA. -- Beginning with the Revolutionary War when British agents and sympathizers attempted to derail independence, there have been people who have tried to infiltrate the United States for the purpose of undermining and destroying it. In modern times, communism and fascism have sent agents among us, but we discovered their plans and defeated them. Now comes what may be the greatest threat: radical Islam, whose "agents" may have established a base more solid and more dangerous than anything we've encountered before.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2001
Archaeologists digging at the site of a future traffic circle in Mount Aetna, in Washington County, thought they might find traces of buildings linked to a nearby iron furnace that forged cannon for the Revolutionary War. Instead, they stumbled on far more ancient weaponry - finished stone spear points, flawed or broken blades and stone chips discarded by Native American craftsmen more than 3,000 years ago. "This site likely served as a short-term camp...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2011
Three years of digging at a prehistoric Indian site in Anne Arundel County has unearthed the oldest structures and human habitations in Maryland and is making this bluff above the Patuxent River one of the most important archaeological sites in the Mid-Atlantic. Last week, archaeologists learned from carbon-14 dating that a stone hearth they uncovered this summer was last used 9,290 years ago. That makes the site, called Pig Point, twice as old as the earliest carbon-dated human habitation found previously in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2009
Age: 39 Salary: $85,000 Years on the job: 2 1/2 How she got started: : Growing up in Minnesota, Julie Schablitsky first became interested in archaeology at the age of seven when she discovered fossils in the limestone of her gravel driveway. She went on her first dig at the age of 15 and at the age of 18 began working as an archaeologist in the Midwest for the National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service during the summers. She received a bachelor's degree from the University of Minnesota in anthropology and a master's degree from Oregon State University in anthropology.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN | June 23, 2006
Researchers say they have discovered the oldest beads ever used for decorative purposes - a finding that pushes back the date for the dawn of modern human culture by 25,000 years. Detailed analysis of beads made from mollusk shells that were dug up years ago in Israel and Algeria show that they were probably hand carved about 100,000 years ago, researchers say. They also are similar to beads believed to be about 75,000 years old that were discovered several years ago. They were at an archaeological site known as the Blombos Cave on the coast of the Indian Ocean in South Africa.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | January 18, 2006
ARLINGTON, VA. -- Beginning with the Revolutionary War when British agents and sympathizers attempted to derail independence, there have been people who have tried to infiltrate the United States for the purpose of undermining and destroying it. In modern times, communism and fascism have sent agents among us, but we discovered their plans and defeated them. Now comes what may be the greatest threat: radical Islam, whose "agents" may have established a base more solid and more dangerous than anything we've encountered before.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2001
Archaeologists digging at the site of a future traffic circle in Mount Aetna, in Washington County, thought they might find traces of buildings linked to a nearby iron furnace that forged cannon for the Revolutionary War. Instead, they stumbled on far more ancient weaponry - finished stone spear points, flawed or broken blades and stone chips discarded by Native American craftsmen more than 3,000 years ago. "This site likely served as a short-term camp...
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2000
Finding the treasure believed buried in some Annapolis woods near Mill Creek would be an archaeological coup. Here, at the first European settlement in Anne Arundel County, Al Luckenbach and his team of archaeologists are digging their way through the domestic debris of Emanuel Drue, a 17th-century tobacco planter and pipe maker who lived on a piece of land called Swan Cove, in the village of Providence. Beneath the pottery shards, brass buttons and oyster shells embedded in the soil, Luckenbach, who heads the county's archaeology department, is looking for the pipe kiln where Drue fired his crude clay pipes.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Evening Sun Staff | February 19, 1991
FOR THE PAST month, allied forces have steadily bombed the lands where humanity took the first steps to make itself civilized. Sometimes, underneath the barrage of military reports, one hears the names of antiquity -- Nineveh . . . Ur . . . Babylon . . . -- names whispered like reproaches from older, wiser relatives.Archaeologists say there are tens of thousands of archaeological sites in Iraq, a country roughly the size of California. The world's earliest cities flourished in the region between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2011
Three years of digging at a prehistoric Indian site in Anne Arundel County has unearthed the oldest structures and human habitations in Maryland and is making this bluff above the Patuxent River one of the most important archaeological sites in the Mid-Atlantic. Last week, archaeologists learned from carbon-14 dating that a stone hearth they uncovered this summer was last used 9,290 years ago. That makes the site, called Pig Point, twice as old as the earliest carbon-dated human habitation found previously in Maryland.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 26, 1995
STONEHENGE, England -- Clews Everard has the toughest job in British tourism.She is the general manager of Stonehenge, the prehistoric circle of stones that lures archaeologists, protesters, Druids, New Age travelers, film crews and 750,000 tourists annually to the green, wind-swept Salisbury Plain.At Stonehenge, people want to celebrate marriages, have their loved one's ashes spread, pray, and play music at sunrise. There was even a group of protesters who showed up in May and rappelled off the stones.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | July 23, 1995
TEL MIQNE, Israel -- Under the rolling wheat fields of a kibbutz lies a 3,000-year-old city that thrived, waned and was finally burned away.Why? Twenty-year-old Catherine Meiseles of Baltimore is helping find out. She and about 90 other students-- including three others from Baltimore -- spent the summer with trowels and shovels to reveal the ancient city of Ekron."
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