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NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | March 14, 1992
To the ancient Greeks, Arcadia was a place of pastoral peace and simplicity. For most of the year, that's the way of life in Baltimore County's village of Arcadia, too.But during summer and early fall, the one-street rural community rocks and rolls as the volunteer fire company stages one event after another, and just about everybody joins in.In late July, crowds throng tree-lined Arcadia Avenue in front of the big turn-of-the century houses, as marching bands...
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | November 18, 2013
After 20 years as a Mount Washingtonian, Linda Noll felt like she still didn't really know her community and its past as well as she would like. Now, Noll is promoting her new book for Arcadia Publishing, "Around Mount Washington," part of Arcadia's well-known "Images of America" series. "This is a historical journey," said Noll, 64, who has spent recent weeks promoting her book. Noll has given talks and done book signings as close to home as the Mount Washington Fitness and Aquatic Center, at a block party sponsored by the Mount Washington Village Merchants Association, and as a guide on a bus tour for seniors at Springwell Senior Living, an assisted lliving community in Mount Washington.
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NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | September 7, 1994
Every September, thousands park the family car and happily trot away from dependable '90s automotive technology, eyes searching for another sight: puffs of steam, the chug and sputter of cumbersome engines, and heavy whirling wheels painted in carnival color.These people have come to celebrate one part of the history of machines at the Steam Show of the Maryland Steam Historical Society at the Arcadia Exposition Grounds. This year, from Sept. 15 through 18, the 39th show will take place.The show packs the acreage with antique engines powered by steam or gas. Most of them are put to the test: threshing, saw-milling, shingle sawing, or the ever-popular pulling of wagons loaded with children and their parents.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2005
A trio of junkers gang up against a station wagon, the kind with the wood paneling. They take turns smashing it head-on and crashing its sides, until the crumpled metal heap is pinned against a dirt wall. Some local guys nose-dive their cars from a makeshift ramp into a dead man's limo, and a hair stylist blithely walks away from her burning Oldsmobile. An engineering student turns to the dairy aisle for an auto repair trick that he calls "egg drop soup." All in all, it's the perfect setting, one man decides, to propose to his girlfriend.
BUSINESS
By Natasha Lesser and Natasha Lesser,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 25, 2004
You might expect Kathleen Kotarba, Baltimore's head of architectural preservation, to live in one of the city's most recognized havens of preserved architecture: Mount Vernon, Bolton Hill or Roland Park. But Kotarba doesn't call any of these home; instead she has chosen Arcadia, the Northeast Baltimore community that is not as well known as some of the other city addresses. "We moved here because we really loved the architecture and the setting next to Herring Run Park," says Kotarba, who has lived in Arcadia for more than 20 years.
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | July 28, 1993
Carnivals entertain everyone on summertime evenings. They're so popular that firemen's carnivals are a Carroll County tradition. Next week, from Monday to Saturday, the Arcadia Volunteer Fire Company will hold its carnival, with rides beginning at 6:30 p.m. every day.The bright lights of the Arcadia carnival grounds are easy to spot, about 5 miles south of Hampstead. If you're traveling south on Route 30, turn left on Arcadia Avenue and left on Carnival Avenue to the grounds that spread behind the firehouse.
NEWS
By R.N. Marshall and R.N. Marshall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 2004
Playwright Tom Stoppard, author of such classic works of theater as Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead, The Real Thing, Rough Crossing, Travesties and The Real Inspector Hound, among others, is best known for his erudite wit and delicious command of the English language. As a screenwriter, his films, such as Empire of the Sun and Shakespeare In Love, have earned high praise from critics and audiences. Columbia's Rep Stage, the professional theater in residence at Howard Community College, is ending its 2003-2004 season with Arcadia, another Stoppard gem. Set in the early 1800s, as well as present day, Arcadia takes the audience on a fascinating journey back and forth between eras to discover answers to an intriguing mystery of love, history and deception that centers on the romantic poet Lord Byron.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2001
William D. Livingston and pals from Hampden headed out to the country one recent Saturday night, fueled by a passion for pop culture, armed with a cooler full of Natty Boh, eager for the chance to poke fun at the locals. But within minutes of arriving at the Arcadia Demolition Derby, Livingston was standing on top of his Igloo, gleefully shouting as cars collided in a cacophony of crunching sheet metal, hissing radiators and flapping tires. This was a battle to the death, and Livingston was seriously hooked.
NEWS
February 15, 1994
FIRE* Hampstead: Hampstead, Manchester and Arcadia of Baltimore County responded to a chimney fire on Willow View Court at 9:27 Sunday. Units were out 40 minutes.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 10, 2004
THE ARCADIA of ancient Greece was pastoral and isolated, a simple and untroubled place. Some considered it paradise. The Arcadia of Northeast Baltimore isn't bad, either. It's bordered by Herring Run Park on the south, with Lake Montebello nearby, and - I only mention this because tomorrow's the holiday in his honor - it features the oldest monument to Christopher Columbus in the United States, and one of three in Baltimore. (Did we go overboard for this guy, or what? And Italians love to give props to Columbus when it was the Spanish, for cryin' out loud, who gave the guy his ships and his funding.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 18, 2004
In Baltimore County Police identify Arcadia man killed in tractor accident ARCADIA -- Baltimore County police released yesterday the name of a man killed Sunday when a farm tractor he was driving overturned in a creek. Don Baldwin Bruner, 66, of the 16200 block of Trenton Church Road in Arcadia was mowing a field on his property when the tractor fell into a creek, pinning him under 2 feet of water, Baltimore County fire officials said. An autopsy will be conducted, police said. Councilmen, advisory panel to discuss community issues EDGEMERE -- Baltimore County Councilmen John Olszewski of Dundalk and Joseph Bartenfelder of Fullerton will meet tonight with the Southeast Area Educational Advisory Council to discuss community issues.
BUSINESS
By Natasha Lesser and Natasha Lesser,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 25, 2004
You might expect Kathleen Kotarba, Baltimore's head of architectural preservation, to live in one of the city's most recognized havens of preserved architecture: Mount Vernon, Bolton Hill or Roland Park. But Kotarba doesn't call any of these home; instead she has chosen Arcadia, the Northeast Baltimore community that is not as well known as some of the other city addresses. "We moved here because we really loved the architecture and the setting next to Herring Run Park," says Kotarba, who has lived in Arcadia for more than 20 years.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2004
"History never embraces more than a small part of reality," said La Rochefoucauld. The maxim is brilliantly illustrated by Tom Stoppard's Arcadia, the current production at Columbia's Rep Stage. Although it offers plenty of Stoppard's customary wit and word play, Arcadia is a philosophical exercise -- an exploration of chaos theory. The dialogue bristles with references to mathematics, physics, philosophy, history, literature and English culture. It will be a rare playgoer (or reviewer)
NEWS
By R.N. Marshall and R.N. Marshall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 2004
Playwright Tom Stoppard, author of such classic works of theater as Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead, The Real Thing, Rough Crossing, Travesties and The Real Inspector Hound, among others, is best known for his erudite wit and delicious command of the English language. As a screenwriter, his films, such as Empire of the Sun and Shakespeare In Love, have earned high praise from critics and audiences. Columbia's Rep Stage, the professional theater in residence at Howard Community College, is ending its 2003-2004 season with Arcadia, another Stoppard gem. Set in the early 1800s, as well as present day, Arcadia takes the audience on a fascinating journey back and forth between eras to discover answers to an intriguing mystery of love, history and deception that centers on the romantic poet Lord Byron.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 26, 2003
God returns to prime time tonight. That's the larger news connected to the debut of the new CBS drama Joan of Arcadia, about a high school girl to whom God suddenly starts speaking. It is one of three new network dramas - arriving this fall and midseason - that feature young women who hear voices. It's not clear who exactly is talking to the lead characters in the other two dramas, Tru Calling and Wonderfalls, both of which are on Fox. In Tru Calling, a recent college graduate discovers she can relive a day and uses that newfound power to avoid tragedy.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2002
Although it's commonplace for opera-goers to attend preperformance lectures and study libretti before attending unfamiliar operas, such preparation is seldom part of ordinary theater-going. This changed when Colonial Players Inc. scheduled a challenging work by a major playwright with Tom Stoppard's Arcadia, realizing that audience members might welcome some advance preparation. Winner of the 1993 Laurence Olivier award for best play when it premiered in London, and two years later on Broadway the winner of the New York Drama Critics Award, Stoppard's Arcadia moves beyond the usual human appetites to the desire to know about our surroundings in landscape architecture, thermodynamics, the chaos theory, literature and Romanticism.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2001
William D. Livingston and pals from Hampden headed out to the country one recent Saturday night, fueled by a passion for pop culture, armed with a cooler full of Natty Boh, eager for the chance to poke fun at the locals. But within minutes of arriving at the Arcadia Demolition Derby, Livingston was standing on top of his Igloo, gleefully shouting as cars collided in a cacophony of crunching sheet metal, hissing radiators and flapping tires. This was a battle to the death, and Livingston was seriously hooked.
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