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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2006
In the age of high-octane gaming consoles such as Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3, arcade games can seem almost prehistoric. But one addictive arcade brand still attracts and connects a large following in bars across the country: Golden Tee. When the first Golden Tee Live came out in 2005, it allowed gamers to link up to a global network and play golf against each other for money. It fostered a community of arcade gamers who played together in bars -- not alone in front of TVs. That sense of camaraderie is one of the game's draws, said Dan Schrementi, a marketing associate for Golden Tee parent company Incredible Technologies Inc. "With Golden Tee in general, even though you're connected in that online community, it's a social experience," Schrementi said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
James L. Akers Jr., a retired financial analyst and businessman who collected and restored vintage arcade machines, died Wednesday of kidney cancer at his Ellicott City home. He was 73. The son of a dentist and a homemaker, James Lee Akers Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Regester Avenue in Stoneleigh. Herbert W. Dorsey grew up a few doors away, and they remained lifelong friends. "It was a neighborhood of boys, and we naturally gravitated to his home because Jim had a pool table," said Mr. Dorsey, a retired Public Health Service officer who lives in Bethesda.
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TRAVEL
By Bo Smolka and Bo Smolka,Special to the Sun | April 18, 2004
Time is at something of a standstill in Duncannon, Pa., a no-stoplight town tucked along a bend in the Susquehanna River about 80 miles north of Baltimore. Trains still rattle the windows of houses as they rumble through town, carrying freight through the Pennsylvania coal region. The Doyle Hotel in the center of town looks as if it hasn't been touched in years. But nowhere in Duncannon is time locked in more of a deep freeze than at the Old Sled Works, a former sled factory turned antiques shop at the north end of town.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
For a video-game enthusiast like Billy Smith, walking into Crab Towne USA is like walking into a shrine — one you can play for 25 cents a pop. "Holy heck, it felt like I just stepped out of the 1970s," Smith, 23, says after spending some time with the 120-plus arcade video games and pinball machines at the Glen Burnie eatery. "This is probably misty-eyed nostalgia talking, but these are just so cool. " Stepping into Crab Towne is, indeed, like setting foot inside a time machine, going back to a day before consoles brought video-gaming into the home, when the nimble-fingered had to plunk a quarter into a machine to play Pac-Man, Space Invaders or Galaga.
SPORTS
September 7, 2007
A weekly look at a fun place to catch a Ravens game: CHEERS Where: 1900 East Joppa Road, Parkville Viewing pleasure: Two 10-foot monitors, nine plasmas, 10 20-inch TVs Best seat in the house: In the dining area there are seven plasmas surrounding you and one of the 10-foot monitors. You can watch all the games from there. Crowd: Mostly Ravens fans, including a Ravens Roost fan club. Pre-game meal: $10 for a bucket of five beers; $5 for cheese sticks, $6 for 12 wings. On the wall: Arcade games and mirrors.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2004
Last week's question: What is your favorite thing to do at amusement parks? 52.6 percent Ride the roller coasters (41 votes) 12.8 percent Watch the people (10 votes) 10.3 percent Ride the water rides (8 votes) 6.4 percent Play in the water park (5 votes) 5.1 percent Ride other rides (4 votes) 3.8 percent Play arcade games (3 votes) 3.8 percent Walk around (3 votes) 2.6 percent Cut lines (2 votes) 2.6 percent Eat (2 votes) 0 percent Shop (0 votes) 78 total votes Question of the week: What's the best summer movie so far?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
James L. Akers Jr., a retired financial analyst and businessman who collected and restored vintage arcade machines, died Wednesday of kidney cancer at his Ellicott City home. He was 73. The son of a dentist and a homemaker, James Lee Akers Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Regester Avenue in Stoneleigh. Herbert W. Dorsey grew up a few doors away, and they remained lifelong friends. "It was a neighborhood of boys, and we naturally gravitated to his home because Jim had a pool table," said Mr. Dorsey, a retired Public Health Service officer who lives in Bethesda.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL STROH and MICHAEL STROH,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1998
There was a time when 6-foot-tall video arcade games ruled the Earth.When Pac-Man was on the radio, best-seller lists, and blue jeans. When Americans pumped 20 billion quarters - more than they spent on movies and casinos combined - into arcade games for a quick digital fix.Decades later, these electronic dinosaurs are vanishing, run out of shopping malls and 7-Elevens by personal computers and home entertainment systems. But the games that once entranced us are flickering back to life, revived by the same nostalgic forces that gave birth to "Leave It To Beaver" marathons and classic-rock radio.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | July 11, 1995
One of Towson's most visible landmarks is changing images. The old Finkelstein's store on York Road is trading in its family-oriented, department-store demeanor to become a billiard hall.And video arcade. And ice cream parlor. And an under-21 weekend nightclub.The Four Corners of Towson entertainment center is expected to open Aug. 10, replacing the store that closed in 1994, after 66 years at the site. "It gives kids something else to do," David Betz, vice president of Four Corners, said yesterday.
FEATURES
By Anne Miller and Anne Miller,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Asteroids. Space Invaders. Visions of Pac-Man ghosts dancing in your head.For more than two decades, video games have often been derided as the mental equivalent of bubble gum, a diversion for aimless youths intent on frittering away time and money.But arcades as socio-economic catalysts? Pong as essential forerunner of Windows '95? Tokyo Wars as educational endeavor?Keith Feinstein thinks so. And, in a crusade to educate America about the virtues of video arcade games, the computer buff from New Providence, N.J., has created a traveling, museum-style exhibit to support his case.
SPORTS
September 7, 2007
A weekly look at a fun place to catch a Ravens game: CHEERS Where: 1900 East Joppa Road, Parkville Viewing pleasure: Two 10-foot monitors, nine plasmas, 10 20-inch TVs Best seat in the house: In the dining area there are seven plasmas surrounding you and one of the 10-foot monitors. You can watch all the games from there. Crowd: Mostly Ravens fans, including a Ravens Roost fan club. Pre-game meal: $10 for a bucket of five beers; $5 for cheese sticks, $6 for 12 wings. On the wall: Arcade games and mirrors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2006
In the age of high-octane gaming consoles such as Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3, arcade games can seem almost prehistoric. But one addictive arcade brand still attracts and connects a large following in bars across the country: Golden Tee. When the first Golden Tee Live came out in 2005, it allowed gamers to link up to a global network and play golf against each other for money. It fostered a community of arcade gamers who played together in bars -- not alone in front of TVs. That sense of camaraderie is one of the game's draws, said Dan Schrementi, a marketing associate for Golden Tee parent company Incredible Technologies Inc. "With Golden Tee in general, even though you're connected in that online community, it's a social experience," Schrementi said.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2005
It's a surf war of sorts: Atlantic vs. Pacific, sunrise vs. sunset, from concentrate vs. fresh-squeezed, pines vs. palms. O.C. vs. The O.C. The people of Ocean City, Md. - known locally, of course, as O.C. - insist that they'd make a far better story line than a certain swankier beach community that has lately usurped their nickname. "Everyone knows that O.C. means Ocean City, not Orange County," said Rick Michaels, who air blasts T-shirts at Pop's Joke Shop, and who is not a fan of The O.C., Fox's hit nighttime soap about nattily dressed California teens and their lovelorn parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2004
Last week's question: What is your favorite thing to do at amusement parks? 52.6 percent Ride the roller coasters (41 votes) 12.8 percent Watch the people (10 votes) 10.3 percent Ride the water rides (8 votes) 6.4 percent Play in the water park (5 votes) 5.1 percent Ride other rides (4 votes) 3.8 percent Play arcade games (3 votes) 3.8 percent Walk around (3 votes) 2.6 percent Cut lines (2 votes) 2.6 percent Eat (2 votes) 0 percent Shop (0 votes) 78 total votes Question of the week: What's the best summer movie so far?
TRAVEL
By Bo Smolka and Bo Smolka,Special to the Sun | April 18, 2004
Time is at something of a standstill in Duncannon, Pa., a no-stoplight town tucked along a bend in the Susquehanna River about 80 miles north of Baltimore. Trains still rattle the windows of houses as they rumble through town, carrying freight through the Pennsylvania coal region. The Doyle Hotel in the center of town looks as if it hasn't been touched in years. But nowhere in Duncannon is time locked in more of a deep freeze than at the Old Sled Works, a former sled factory turned antiques shop at the north end of town.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2002
Counter-terrorist Tony Seo was dying a miserable death, slowly bleeding out after being ambushed by his enemies in Glen Burnie. Worse, they taunted him as they ran from the scene. "They knew where I was," Seo grumbled as he slumped in his chair, wincing at catcalls from the other end of the room. "They must have looked at my screen." Seo was dying in the world of "PC bangs" - noisy, garishly-lighted late-night PC game rooms equipped with high bandwidth Internet connections and violent game action.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2005
It's a surf war of sorts: Atlantic vs. Pacific, sunrise vs. sunset, from concentrate vs. fresh-squeezed, pines vs. palms. O.C. vs. The O.C. The people of Ocean City, Md. - known locally, of course, as O.C. - insist that they'd make a far better story line than a certain swankier beach community that has lately usurped their nickname. "Everyone knows that O.C. means Ocean City, not Orange County," said Rick Michaels, who air blasts T-shirts at Pop's Joke Shop, and who is not a fan of The O.C., Fox's hit nighttime soap about nattily dressed California teens and their lovelorn parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Film Critic | September 3, 2000
QUEENS, N.Y. --- Who knew that television dates back all the way to the 19th century? That Orson Welles could sketch nearly as well as he could direct? That movie merchandising didn't begin with "Star Wars," but goes as far back as the silent cinema? Such surprising nuggets of entertainment trivia are among the manifold delights of a 12-year-old museum hidden away in a Queens neighborhood. Even in a city known for cultural institutions, the American Museum of the Moving Image is a singular delight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2000
I feel about Pac-Man the way my mother feels about "Casablanca." Just like a great movie, a classic rock'n roll song or the season the Red Sox almost beat the Reds in the World Series, my favorite arcade games bring back memories of youth. During the arcade craze of the early 80s, I was a teen-ager in Massachusetts, and quarters burned holes in my pocket until I could get a bunch of friends together to head for the cartoonish lights and sounds of Holyoke Mall's arcade. It was all about fun. Now, at 36, I get that feeling again - at least for a few nostalgic hours a week - thanks to a 200-pound arcade cabinet in my basement that stands nearly six feet tall.
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