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By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,KNIGHT-RIDDER TRIBUNE | March 26, 1997
Risi e bisi, or Italian rice and peas, has all the attributes necessary to qualify as adult comfort food. It's warm, soft and creamy-tasting and quite filling. Yet unlike most comfort foods, this one is low in fat. Just 13 percent of the calories in this cool-weather dish comes from fat.This streamlined version of a traditional northern Italian dish is made with just one tablespoon each of butter and olive oil and a quarter-cup of Parmesan cheese, but no cream. It tastes creamy because it's made with arborio rice, a short-grained variety grown in Italy.
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By Betty Rosbottom | November 11, 2007
Although I adore risotto, I rarely make it for company as it requires a good deal of cooking at the last minute. I have on occasion prepared it in advance, using various techniques, but at heart I am a fan of making this glorious Italian specialty and eating it soon afterward. Imagine my surprise when I stumbled across a recipe for baked risotto. The directions called for spreading Arborio rice in a buttered baking dish, covering the grains with hot, simmering stock and melted butter, then placing the pan in the oven until all the liquids were absorbed by the rice.
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NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 13, 2005
Recently I was very fortunate to dine at a fabulous restaurant. While I was there, the chef prepared a mushroom risotto that was to die for. I must have that recipe (or at least something comparable)! Let's take a look at what makes a risotto great. First, you have to have the correct rice -- Italian arborio. You can make risotto out of other types of rice; you can even make a risotto type of dish from barley. But arborio rice makes it the best. The next critical ingredient is the cheese -- it must be real Parmigiano-Reggiano, not something that comes out of a can. When it comes to cooking risotto, remember a couple of things.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 13, 2005
Recently I was very fortunate to dine at a fabulous restaurant. While I was there, the chef prepared a mushroom risotto that was to die for. I must have that recipe (or at least something comparable)! Let's take a look at what makes a risotto great. First, you have to have the correct rice -- Italian arborio. You can make risotto out of other types of rice; you can even make a risotto type of dish from barley. But arborio rice makes it the best. The next critical ingredient is the cheese -- it must be real Parmigiano-Reggiano, not something that comes out of a can. When it comes to cooking risotto, remember a couple of things.
FEATURES
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 1996
Risotto. Even the word sounds voluptuous as it rolls off the tongue.If cheese is milk's leap to immortality, then risotto surely is rice's descent into sin. It tastes so rich and silken and creamy that it almost seems naughty to eat it.For those who have not tried the Northern Italian rice dish, it is an amalgam of short-grain rice swollen with broth and bound with -- usually -- butter and Parmesan cheese.In Italy, risotto is served, as pasta is, as a first course before the meat or fish entree.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 12, 1994
Recently, I have been impressed and influenced by the simple and effective way good friends, who both work full-time, have been giving successful dinner parties. The hosts' secret lies in carefully selecting and preparing an all-in-one main course and a salad to go with it. They buy such appetizers as cheese and breads or smoked salmon and buy tarts, cakes or cookies at a good local bakery for dessert.This week I decided to adopt their philosophy when planning a small supper for neighbors.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom | November 11, 2007
Although I adore risotto, I rarely make it for company as it requires a good deal of cooking at the last minute. I have on occasion prepared it in advance, using various techniques, but at heart I am a fan of making this glorious Italian specialty and eating it soon afterward. Imagine my surprise when I stumbled across a recipe for baked risotto. The directions called for spreading Arborio rice in a buttered baking dish, covering the grains with hot, simmering stock and melted butter, then placing the pan in the oven until all the liquids were absorbed by the rice.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | November 3, 1993
Q: When a recipe calls for rice, what kind should you use and does it make a difference?A: Unless otherwise specified, basic long-grain white rice (not instant) is a safe choice for a recipe calling for rice. Some varieties of rice are interchangeable without a different cooking time, but can add more flavor. Examples of these are Basmati rice or pecan rice, which both have a nutlike character. Arborio rice is considered the classic rice for such dishes as paella and risotto, but new renditions of these recipes often call for Basmati and therefore will specify their own cooking times.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 29, 1993
New Year's Eve is my favorite night to entertain. However, rather than giving a large party with a crowd of revelers, my husband and I decided long ago we liked sharing this holiday with a small circle of close friends. So, since the '80s we have been welcoming each new year by cooking a special meal with the same group.The ritual is always the same. As the hosts, we are responsible for the table setting and the opening course plus the entree. Others prepare appetizers, side dishes and dessert.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | August 6, 2000
This week's menus Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost- cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's...
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 15, 2001
Some dishes are a challenge to prepare, especially for entertaining, but if they are exceptionally good, they merit the effort. Risotto, the celebrated rice preparation from northern Italy, falls into this category. Made by stirring simmering stock into rice (and often onions, too) which has been sauteed in butter, risotto is not a quick dish. The stock must be added slowly, about a half-cup at a time, and stirred until it has been completely absorbed by the grains. This technique usually takes about 20 minutes, and the cook must stand at the stove the entire time, constantly making circles with a spoon in the pot. The resulting rice, however, is rich and creamy, with grains that remain separate and firm.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | August 6, 2000
This week's menus Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost- cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's...
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | May 20, 1998
Just one spoonful of rice pudding takes Sheena Kadam back to her English childhood, when the sweet, creamy dessert was served almost weekly at school and nearly as often at home.You can hear the nostalgia in her voice as she describes helping her mother stir it on the stove. She tells of her earliest food memory ` eating rice and cream."It's the ultimate comfort food," she says.But Brits aren't the only ones who are passionate about rice pudding (though they may be more passionate than most)
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,KNIGHT-RIDDER TRIBUNE | March 26, 1997
Risi e bisi, or Italian rice and peas, has all the attributes necessary to qualify as adult comfort food. It's warm, soft and creamy-tasting and quite filling. Yet unlike most comfort foods, this one is low in fat. Just 13 percent of the calories in this cool-weather dish comes from fat.This streamlined version of a traditional northern Italian dish is made with just one tablespoon each of butter and olive oil and a quarter-cup of Parmesan cheese, but no cream. It tastes creamy because it's made with arborio rice, a short-grained variety grown in Italy.
FEATURES
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 1996
Risotto. Even the word sounds voluptuous as it rolls off the tongue.If cheese is milk's leap to immortality, then risotto surely is rice's descent into sin. It tastes so rich and silken and creamy that it almost seems naughty to eat it.For those who have not tried the Northern Italian rice dish, it is an amalgam of short-grain rice swollen with broth and bound with -- usually -- butter and Parmesan cheese.In Italy, risotto is served, as pasta is, as a first course before the meat or fish entree.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 12, 1994
Recently, I have been impressed and influenced by the simple and effective way good friends, who both work full-time, have been giving successful dinner parties. The hosts' secret lies in carefully selecting and preparing an all-in-one main course and a salad to go with it. They buy such appetizers as cheese and breads or smoked salmon and buy tarts, cakes or cookies at a good local bakery for dessert.This week I decided to adopt their philosophy when planning a small supper for neighbors.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 15, 2001
Some dishes are a challenge to prepare, especially for entertaining, but if they are exceptionally good, they merit the effort. Risotto, the celebrated rice preparation from northern Italy, falls into this category. Made by stirring simmering stock into rice (and often onions, too) which has been sauteed in butter, risotto is not a quick dish. The stock must be added slowly, about a half-cup at a time, and stirred until it has been completely absorbed by the grains. This technique usually takes about 20 minutes, and the cook must stand at the stove the entire time, constantly making circles with a spoon in the pot. The resulting rice, however, is rich and creamy, with grains that remain separate and firm.
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | May 20, 1998
Just one spoonful of rice pudding takes Sheena Kadam back to her English childhood, when the sweet, creamy dessert was served almost weekly at school and nearly as often at home.You can hear the nostalgia in her voice as she describes helping her mother stir it on the stove. She tells of her earliest food memory ` eating rice and cream."It's the ultimate comfort food," she says.But Brits aren't the only ones who are passionate about rice pudding (though they may be more passionate than most)
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 29, 1993
New Year's Eve is my favorite night to entertain. However, rather than giving a large party with a crowd of revelers, my husband and I decided long ago we liked sharing this holiday with a small circle of close friends. So, since the '80s we have been welcoming each new year by cooking a special meal with the same group.The ritual is always the same. As the hosts, we are responsible for the table setting and the opening course plus the entree. Others prepare appetizers, side dishes and dessert.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | November 3, 1993
Q: When a recipe calls for rice, what kind should you use and does it make a difference?A: Unless otherwise specified, basic long-grain white rice (not instant) is a safe choice for a recipe calling for rice. Some varieties of rice are interchangeable without a different cooking time, but can add more flavor. Examples of these are Basmati rice or pecan rice, which both have a nutlike character. Arborio rice is considered the classic rice for such dishes as paella and risotto, but new renditions of these recipes often call for Basmati and therefore will specify their own cooking times.
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