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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1996
Restoring nearly $750,000 to the budget of Baltimore's Department of Recreation and Parks will spare from elimination the division that maintains the greenhouse at Cylburn Arboretum and the Conservatory at Druid Hill Park and save the jobs of 13 recreation leaders, the city's budget director said yesterday.The Board of Estimates yesterday approved Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's revised budget plan that includes the additional recreation and parks funds and $986,000 more for the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Robert Lenox Dwight, a retired engineer who founded the National Electronics Museum and was active in the Assateague Coastal Trust and the Cylburn Arboretum, died of pneumonia March 22 at Baywoods of Annapolis. He was 91 and had lived on Gibson Island. Born in New York City, he was the son of Maitland Dwight, an attorney, and Lydia Butler Dwight, a homemaker. After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy, he entered Princeton University in 1941. Following Pearl Harbor, he enlisted in the Navy and entered its V-12 education program.
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NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | July 20, 1993
Tom Ford spent Saturday morning hacking at a tangle of juniper that had taken over a planting at Greenway Gardens TC Environmental Center near Westminster."
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Baltimore will spend more than $2 million to extend the Jones Falls Trail by another 3.1 miles from the Cylburn Arboretum to the Mount Washington Light Rail stop under an agreement approved Wednesday by the city's spending panel. The Board of Estimates agreed to accept the federal money from the state Department of Transportation for the next phase of the $6.6 million bicycle and pedestrian trail, which is planned for a 10-mile stretch beginning at the Inner Harbor and running north along the Jones Falls stream valley.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | June 17, 1993
Environmental education and plant preservation can peacefully co-exist at Greenway Gardens, Carroll County nature lovers decided Tuesday night."We have a lot of uses that would work well together," horticulturist Steve Bogash said to nearly 60 people at the first meeting of Friends of Greenway Gardens."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
Jim Rose gave a tree tour as he walked the perimeter of Harwood Neighborhood Park in Elkridge. On the blackgum: "A woodland tree in Maryland that grows all over the place." On the silver maple: "Not a great tree, it grows too fast and drops limbs." The park is the site of Rose's "arboretum without walls," a project that he developed to identify and describe trees. He figures that if people know more about their environment, they'll take more of an interest in what happens to it. "We take existing trees and put tags and labels on them, so people walking in the park can begin to become more aware of what kinds of trees are there," said the retired computer scientist, who's designed four other arboretums at county parks.
TRAVEL
By Glen Elsasser and Glen Elsasser,Chicago Tribune | May 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Visitors and residents alike have flocked to the capital for the annual rite of spring -- the Cherry Blossom Festival, which floods the Tidal Basin with the pink and white blossoms of the Japanese cherry tree. But in a far corner of the city, there's even more luscious flora -- now and throughout the year -- in the exotic landscape of trees, flowers, birds and scenic vistas of the U.S. National Arboretum. "There are beautiful plants to see in each season," spokeswoman Nancy Luria said of the free garden.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | January 9, 1991
Carroll environmentalists, sportsmen and recreation officials have urged the county's General Assembly delegation to lobby to save an arboretum from being bought and developed for other purposes.Upset that state officials decided last month to postpone purchasing Greenway Gardens & Arboretum in order to trim the budget deficit, they turned out in force Saturday at the annual presession public hearing to lodge their disapproval.About 60 residents attended the hearing at the County Office Building to offer views on recommended state tax structure changes, proposed county liquor law revisions and hunting legislation and the abortion issue.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | December 10, 1992
The state Department of Natural Resources secretary had reason for his late arrival at Greenway Gardens yesterday."I came late on purpose in honor of how long it took us to buy this place," Dr. Torrey C. Brown said with a laugh.The $450,000 transaction took more than three years to arrange, said Bernie Wentker, regional administrator for the state's Program Open Space. And it's still not quite a done deal."The acquisition has been approved by the state Board of Public Works, pending a bond sale," said Mr. Wentker.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2002
For half their married life - and they were married 59 years - the Jeffersons dreamed of building an arboretum around their Mount Airy home. They visited examples across the country. They traveled to national conventions. They even incorporated a nonprofit group to run the envisioned groves and gardens. But the groves and gardens remained just that: envisioned. Three years ago, Pearl Holland Jefferson suggested to her husband that they ought to get a move on. Two years ago, at age 85, she died.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard
For The Baltimore Sun
| October 8, 2013
The next time you're in a liquor store browsing the shelves, imagine you're strolling through a garden. That bottle of gin is a juniper bush with citrus peels and maybe some coriander and even lavender thrown in for good measure. Tequila? Made from the roasted heart of an agave plant. The wine - that's easy - is a tangle of grapevines. That every spirits shop is a garden is the subject of Amy Stewart's best-selling book, "The Drunken Botanist: The Plants that Create the World's Great Drinks.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | September 5, 2013
Baltimore City's Cylburn Arboretum is an artist's paradise, which is why painter Patricia Bennett has been drawn to the 207-acre grounds of trees and gardens since 2005. But unlike other artists who dot the landscape of the longtime city park, Bennett, of Mount Washington, now has an official reason to be there. Since January, the 36-year-old attorney's wife and busy mother of two young children has been working as Cylburn Arboretum's first-ever artist-in-residence, a program that city officials say is designed to formalize the natural connection between artists and the arboretum.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
Doris W. Brumback, an avid gardener who assisted in the rejuvenation of Cylburn Arboretum in the 1970s and 1980s, died Jan. 18 of congestive heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Homeland resident was 92. The daughter of a pharmacist and a homemaker, Doris Weltner was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. After graduating in 1936 from Girls' Latin School, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1940 from Goucher College. During the 1940s, Mrs, Brumback worked for American Airlines.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2011
One of Baltimore's most beautiful settings will be showing off its place in the art world this weekend. More than 50 painters will be exhibiting their work at the Cylburn Arboretum's "Celebration of Art. " While the work will certainly be varied, they'll all share a common theme. Every piece will depict a scene set within the grounds of the 19th-century North Baltimore estate, once home to a prominent Baltimore businessman, now a picturesque oasis of flora and fauna. "When folks visit Cylburn, they find a space that is so inviting," said Nancy Hill, the arboretum's education director.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2009
I found little bugs under my mattress, but I've seen them before along where the ceiling meets the wall. Please tell me they are not bedbugs! Your photos show the larvae of a carpet beetle. These tiny oval beetles are in the Dermestid insect family. Their diet of organic materials ranges from wool, silk, fur, feathers and food items such as grains, spices, dog food and birdseed, to the occasional mouse or animal remains in your attic or basement. Control of carpet beetles is primarily prevention - clean, clean, clean.
NEWS
September 17, 2008
Rachael Berlinrut Rachael will not have a funeral as she elected have her body donated to the state of Maryland. In memory of Rachael and her love of gardens, donations may be made in her name to the Conservatory at Druid Hill Park, the Cylburn Arboretum, or to the U.S. National Arboretum Washington D.C.
NEWS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2002
For half their married life - and they were married 59 years - the Jeffersons dreamed of building an arboretum around their Mount Airy home. They visited examples across the country. They traveled to national conventions. They even incorporated a nonprofit group to run the envisioned groves and gardens. But the groves and gardens remained just that: envisioned. Three years ago, Pearl Holland Jefferson suggested to her husband that they ought to get a move on. Two years ago, at age 85, she died.
NEWS
By Photos by Jerry Jackson and Photos by Jerry Jackson,Sun photographer | July 7, 2008
As the rest of us droop in early July humidity, day lilies of all varieties come to life. The Free State Daylily Society is planning an exhibit and sale of the plants this Sunday at Cylburn Arboretum.
TRAVEL
By Glen Elsasser and Glen Elsasser,Chicago Tribune | May 6, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Visitors and residents alike have flocked to the capital for the annual rite of spring -- the Cherry Blossom Festival, which floods the Tidal Basin with the pink and white blossoms of the Japanese cherry tree. But in a far corner of the city, there's even more luscious flora -- now and throughout the year -- in the exotic landscape of trees, flowers, birds and scenic vistas of the U.S. National Arboretum. "There are beautiful plants to see in each season," spokeswoman Nancy Luria said of the free garden.
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