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By Eric Siegel 2/3 2/3 | October 4, 1991
News/talk station WBAL-AM (1090) once again edged out urban contemporary WXYV-FM (V-103) for the top spot in the local radio ratings, according to the summer Arbitron figures released yesterday.WBAL finished with an 8.3 share of listeners ages 12 and over, compared with an 8.2 for V-103. In the spring Arbitrons, WBAL had a 9.0 share, compared with an 8.6 for V-103.Each share point represents about 3,500 listeners in an average quarter hour.This is the first time in two years that WBAL has finished first for two consecutive quarterly ratings periods.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
Despite a morning-show shake-up that might suggest otherwise, WERQ-FM (92.3) and its urban contemporary format remain firmly atop Baltimore's ratings heap, more than 12,000 listeners ahead of the competition.Just two weeks after the station fired long-time second-banana Tony Boston from its morning show, Arbitron ratings for the first three months of 1999 place 92-Q 3.5 ratings points ahead of second-place WPOC-FM (93.1). Each point represents about 3,600 listeners in an average quarter-hour.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Baltimore radio listeners have a taste for classical music.Both WBJC-FM (91.5) and WJHU-FM (88.1), the local listener-supported stations that principally play the fine-music format, report they had their biggest audiences ever in the Arbitron ratings for the fall quarter."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
Maybe the folks at what used to be V-103 knew something when they ceded Baltimore's urban radio market to their downtown rivals at 92-Q.WERQ-FM (92.3) has vaulted back to the top of Baltimore's radio heap, according to Arbitron ratings released last week for April-June 1997. And it did so in spectacular fashion, besting its closest competitor (WBAL-AM) by 2.5 share points, or roughly 9,000 listeners.WXYV, which had been battling 92-Q for the urban market, threw in the towel late last month, switching formats from Urban Contemporary to Contemporary Hit Radio, a '90s version of Top 40. The station did not make the top-10 list this go-round, the first time that's happened in recent memory.
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By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
Tip your Stetson and pop the top on a can of Lone Star beer. For the first time in its 18-year history, country station WPOC-FM (93.1) is the No. 1-ranked radio outlet in the Baltimore market.WPOC got an 8.9 share of listeners aged 12 and over in the Arbitron ratings for the winter, which were released yesterday, putting it comfortably ahead of second-place news/talk WBAL-AM (1090), which finished with a 7.2 share.WPOC's winter audience showed a significant increase over last fall, when it finished in third place with a 6.9 share and an even greater increase over the winter 1991 ratings, when it registered a 5.8 share.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
Baltimore's longest-running game of musical chairs continues, as WBAL-AM (1090) has nudged WERQ-FM (92.3) back to second place among the city's most listened-to radio stations.Arbitron ratings for Winter '97 place WBAL squarely atop the leader board, with an audience share of 8.5. That translates to roughly 32,200 listeners in an average quarter-hour.WERQ, which last quarter ended a years-long monopoly of the top two positions by WBAL and WPOC-FM (93.1), finished second this go-round with an 8.0 share, roughly 30,100 listeners in an average quarter-hour.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
Baltimore's longest-running game of musical chairs continues, as WBAL-AM (1090) has nudged WERQ-FM (92.3) back to second place among the city's most listened-to radio stations.Arbitron ratings for Winter '97 place WBAL squarely atop the leader board, with an audience share of 8.5. That translates to roughly 32,200 listeners in an average quarter-hour.WERQ, which last quarter ended a years-long monopoly of the top two positions by WBAL and WPOC-FM (93.1), finished second this go-round with an 8.0 share, roughly 30,100 listeners in an average quarter-hour.
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By Michael Hill | June 3, 1991
Channel 13 (WJZ) continued its domination of the local news ratings in the important May sweeps month, at least doubling the ratings of its competitors every time its news came on the air -- other than at noon -- in both the Nielsen and Arbitron ratings.Channel 11 (WBAL) continued its slide in the Arbitron book, where Channel 2 (WMAR) had twice the number of viewers for its 5 o'clock newscast -- a 10 rating and 29 share to a 5 rating/14 share. The 5 p.m. numbers were much closer according to Nielsen -- 9/26 for Channel 2 to 7/20 for Channel 11.Only in the Nielsen numbers for 11 p.m did Channel 11 get out of third place in the afternoon and evening newscast, getting an 8/20 to Channel 2's 7/17.
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By Eric Siegel | October 10, 1990
The general manager of WBSB-FM (B-104), which recently eliminated hard rock and rap music from its play list, says he will meet tomorrow with former Baltimore disc jockey Johnny Walker in an effort to persuade him to accept a regular air slot on the Top-40 station.Jim Fox, who described the response to Mr. Walker's one-day appearance on the station last month as "phenomenal," said the meeting would take place at Mr. Walker's West Virginia farm and said, "Hopefully, we can bring him back."Mr.
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By Eric Siegel | July 16, 1991
For radio station WBAL-AM (1090), springtime is definitely the right time.WBAL, boosted by its broadcast of Baltimore Oriole baseball games, finished first in the spring Arbitron ratings released yesterday -- the third spring in a row it has finished first in the ratings.The news/talk station got a 9.0 share of listeners age 12 and over, up from 8.6 in the winter, narrowly beating out urban contemporary station WXYV-FM (V-103), which had finished first in three of the last four ratings books.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
Baltimore's longest-running game of musical chairs continues, as WBAL-AM (1090) has nudged WERQ-FM (92.3) back to second place among the city's most listened-to radio stations.Arbitron ratings for Winter '97 place WBAL squarely atop the leader board, with an audience share of 8.5. That translates to roughly 32,200 listeners in an average quarter-hour.WERQ, which last quarter ended a years-long monopoly of the top two positions by WBAL and WPOC-FM (93.1), finished second this go-round with an 8.0 share, roughly 30,100 listeners in an average quarter-hour.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
Baltimore's longest-running game of musical chairs continues, as WBAL-AM (1090) has nudged WERQ-FM (92.3) back to second place among the city's most listened-to radio stations.Arbitron ratings for Winter '97 place WBAL squarely atop the leader board, with an audience share of 8.5. That translates to roughly 32,200 listeners in an average quarter-hour.WERQ, which last quarter ended a years-long monopoly of the top two positions by WBAL and WPOC-FM (93.1), finished second this go-round with an 8.0 share, roughly 30,100 listeners in an average quarter-hour.
NEWS
June 30, 1995
There is no mystery about WJHU-FM's format changes that have strengthened its news orientation while banishing classical music to weekends. The station, owned by the Johns Hopkins University, is going after ratings. It believes it will have higher ratings -- and a stronger identity -- as a news-dominated station.Time was when non-commercial radio stations could ignore ratings. No longer. Today, their formats, like those of commercial stations, are determined by the Arbitron book."Unfortunately, this has become more and more necessary in recent years as institutional support has been cut or eliminated," says Cary Smith, general manager of WJHU's arch-rival, WBJC-FM.
NEWS
March 10, 1994
Limited ProgramStaff Writer Steve McKerrow, in "Classical music hits high note in Arbitron ratings" (Feb. 18) would seem to be the bearer of good news to the Baltimore area -- until one stops to examine what the so-called programming at WBJC and WJHU really consists of.As a listener of these stations for more years that I care to mention, let me inform you that one of the stations has a policy of playing almost exclusively from a list of basic repertory items,...
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Baltimore radio listeners have a taste for classical music.Both WBJC-FM (91.5) and WJHU-FM (88.1), the local listener-supported stations that principally play the fine-music format, report they had their biggest audiences ever in the Arbitron ratings for the fall quarter."
BUSINESS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | March 11, 1993
Baltimore radio station WVRT-FM, recognized by jingle listeners as Variety 104, is up for sale along with four other stations around the nation owned by the Scripps-Howard Broadcasting Co."Radio has been a very small component of our broadcast business," said Lawrence A. Leser, president and chief executive of both the E. W. Scripps Co. and its broadcast subsidiary."Following a review of our broadcast properties, we decided to focus our attention on what we know best -- television."E. W. Scripps said its radio operations generated $12.5 million last year, or about 1 percent of the company's revenue.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1990
A U.S. District Court judge in Baltimore has rejected federal sentencing guidelines and refused to impose a prison term on a Bethesda man who stole TV rating equipment from Arbitron Co. for an attempted sale to the A.C. Nielsen Co., Arbitron's chief competitor.Judge William N. Nickerson, the newest judge on the federal bench here, accepted defense arguments yesterday that the theft was "aberrant behavior" by the defendant, former Arbitron employee Barry D. Glick, who suffers from an unspecified personality disorder.
BUSINESS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | March 11, 1993
Baltimore radio station WVRT-FM, recognized by jingle listeners as Variety 104, is up for sale along with four other stations around the nation owned by the Scripps-Howard Broadcasting Co."Radio has been a very small component of our broadcast business," said Lawrence A. Leser, president and chief executive of both the E. W. Scripps Co. and its broadcast subsidiary."Following a review of our broadcast properties, we decided to focus our attention on what we know best -- television."E. W. Scripps said its radio operations generated $12.5 million last year, or about 1 percent of the company's revenue.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
Tip your Stetson and pop the top on a can of Lone Star beer. For the first time in its 18-year history, country station WPOC-FM (93.1) is the No. 1-ranked radio outlet in the Baltimore market.WPOC got an 8.9 share of listeners aged 12 and over in the Arbitron ratings for the winter, which were released yesterday, putting it comfortably ahead of second-place news/talk WBAL-AM (1090), which finished with a 7.2 share.WPOC's winter audience showed a significant increase over last fall, when it finished in third place with a 6.9 share and an even greater increase over the winter 1991 ratings, when it registered a 5.8 share.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | January 18, 1992
Don O'Brien -- the morning drive time personality for dance-oriented Top 40 station WERQ-FM (92 Q) and one of the area's most identifiable broadcast names and voices -- was fired yesterday.Mr. O'Brien, 36, had been with the station formerly known as WYST-FM since 1990 and was one-half of the infamous Brian (Wilson) and O'Brien morning team on WBSB-FM (B-104) in the mid- and late 1980s."I guess they figured I wasn't young enough or hip enough," said Mr. O'Brien, who added that he was warned in a memo from the management of the station two weeks ago to "get your act together or get another job."
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