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By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Nielsen Holdings on Friday announced an agreement with the Federal Trade Commission that the company says clears the way for it to buy Columbia-based Arbitron. Nielsen, best known for its TV ratings, announced in December plans to acquire Arbitron in a $1.3 billion deal. The FTC subsequently raised charges that the proposed deal could reduce competition significantly, causing advertisers, programmers and others to pay more for certain audience measurement services. The agreement calls for Nielsen, within three months, to sell and license certain Arbitron assets related to its cross-platform audience measurement services to a buyer approved by the FTC, the agency said.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
More than 300 people will lose jobs in Columbia with the shutdown of the Nielsen Audio call center, part of the consolidation of media ratings company Nielsen Holdings and former competitor Arbitron Inc., according to a notice filed with the state. The 325 job cuts, expected by the end of August, come on top of 333 layoffs announced last November at the former Arbitron headquarters. When Nielsen's $1.3 billion acquisition of Arbitron was announced in 2012, Arbitron employed nearly 1,000 full-time workers nationwide, including 640 full-time employees and 220 part-time workers in Columbia.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | March 10, 2009
Media research firm Arbitron Inc. said yesterday that it is relocating its corporate headquarters from New York City to Columbia, where most of its employees work. Michael Skarzynski, Arbitron's president and chief executive officer, said in a statement that he and other executives should live and work in Columbia because it is where most of the company's research is done. "He wanted to be where the action is, where the people who will execute the decisions are," said Thom Mocarsky, an Arbitron spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Media ratings firm Nielsen Holdings will shutter its Columbia call center at the end of August, one of three the company will close as it absorbs Arbitron Inc. A Nielsen spokesman declined to say how many people in Maryland will be affected by the call center's closing. A spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said the agency has not received word about layoffs since November, when Nielsen announced it would shed 330 jobs or about a third of its Columbia work force.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | December 29, 1994
The Arbitron Co., the nation's leading radio ratings consultant, is staking part of its growth and profitability on a new division that will survey which information and entertainment technologies people prefer.The company is investing millions of dollars in Arbitron NewMedia, based in Columbia. It will collect in-depth information about consumers' use of satellite television, on-line computer services, interactive television services and other new technologies.The move comes about a year after Arbitron shut down its TV ratings business and laid off more than 400 people in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1994
The Arbitron Co., the radio-ratings company, plans to move its headquarters to Columbia next year -- a boost to the Howard County economy and to the beleaguered Baltimore-Washington office market.The company will move 400 employees from four other sites in Laurel and Beltsville to 127,000 square feet of office space in the Patuxent Woods Business Park. The lease would be one of the largest private-sector deals in the Baltimore area in years.The 15-year-lease is worth more than $20 million, according to Cole Schnorf, a Manekin Corp.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | August 24, 1993
Arbitron Corp. has scotched what could have been one of the biggest real estate deals of the year, choosing not to move to the Airport Square office complex in Linthicum and instead to stay for at least two more years at three buildings in Prince George's County.The decision by the Manhattan-based company sets the stage for another round of competition over Arbitron and its 1,200 local employees in the next 18 months, said Prince George's Economic Development Corp. President Dennis C. Murphy.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | December 19, 1991
If George Orwell worked for Arbitron Ratings Co., he'd love ScanAmerica.Slated to appear in the Baltimore area in three months, the Big Brother-like system tells Arbitron what television programs a household watches, who is watching and what grocery products are bought, Pierre R. Megroz said yesterday.ScanAmerica first debuted in -- you guessed it -- 1984, in the Denver television market. It came to Pittsburgh, Phoenix and St. Louis last year. Kansas City, Mo., and 500 of the Baltimore area's 940,000 television viewing households are scheduled to get it next year.
FEATURES
December 10, 1991
The first peek at the Arbitron November ratings book shows one significant difference from the numbers released by Nielsen over the weekend as the 11 o'clock news on Channel 13 (WJZ) drops considerably while Channel 11 (WBAL) moves into a strong second place in the late news race.The numbers show WJZ with an 11 rating and 29 share at 11 p.m., WBAL with a 9 rating and 22 share and Channel 2 (WMAR) close behind with an 8 rating, 20 share.In the Nielsen book, Channel 13 had a 14 rating at 11 p.m., doubling the 7 ratings recorded by both Channel 11 and Channel 2. In Arbitron, Channel 11 also had a noticeable lead with its noon news over Channel 13 -- a 9 rating compared to a 7 -- though both were virtually tied in Nielsen.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
The media research firm Arbitron Inc. said Tuesday that it is slashing 10 percent of its work force and cutting other expenses as new management refocuses the business and tries to deal with the weak economy. Under the plan, 110 full-time positions, including 80 in the Baltimore area, would be eliminated, company spokesman Thom Mocarsky said in phone interview. About 71 percent, or 767, of the company's 1,084 full-time employees work in Columbia, where the company moved its headquarters this month.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
Nielsen, which acquired Columbia-based Arbitron in September, confirmed Thursday that it is laying off employees but would not say how many. The company said it is restructuring its Nielsen Audio division as a result of the merger, giving no details about the number of workers affected, the timing or the locations. "Nielsen is implementing changes across the company to enhance growth and to align our resources to meet and exceed client needs," the New York-based company said in its brief statement.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Nielsen Holdings on Friday announced an agreement with the Federal Trade Commission that the company says clears the way for it to buy Columbia-based Arbitron. Nielsen, best known for its TV ratings, announced in December plans to acquire Arbitron in a $1.3 billion deal. The FTC subsequently raised charges that the proposed deal could reduce competition significantly, causing advertisers, programmers and others to pay more for certain audience measurement services. The agreement calls for Nielsen, within three months, to sell and license certain Arbitron assets related to its cross-platform audience measurement services to a buyer approved by the FTC, the agency said.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Shareholders of Arbitron Inc. overwhelmingly approved the sale of the Columbia-based company to Nielsen Holdings N.V. during a special stockholders meeting Tuesday. Nielsen, the TV ratings company, announced late last year that it would pay $1.26 billion in cash for Arbitron, which measures radio audiences. Arbitron spokesman Thom Mocarsky said the deal still needs approval from the Federal Trade Commission. Company officials, though, expect the sale to close by the end of the third quarter.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2012
The company that helps TV networks determine what shows get canceled or live for another season is buying the Columbia-based company that helps radio stations decide whether to change formats. Nielsen Holdings of TV ratings fame announced Tuesday that it agreed to pay $1.26 billion in cash for Arbitron Inc., the company that measures radio audiences. The deal brings together the largest audience research firms for two of the largest entertainment media. It gives Nielsen entry to the radio market and allows Arbitron, which largely operates in North America, to piggyback on Nielsen's global reach.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2010
The chief executive of media research firm Arbitron Inc. has resigned amid allegations that he provided false testimony to a congressional committee. The Columbia-based company said in a statement this week that Michael P. Skarzynski resigned because he had violated a company policy in a matter "entirely unrelated" to financial performance. U.S. Rep. Edolphus Towns, chairman of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, said in a statement that Skarzynski might have provided false testimony during a December hearing about whether Arbitron's people meter would silence minority radio stations.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
The media research firm Arbitron Inc. said Tuesday that it is slashing 10 percent of its work force and cutting other expenses as new management refocuses the business and tries to deal with the weak economy. Under the plan, 110 full-time positions, including 80 in the Baltimore area, would be eliminated, company spokesman Thom Mocarsky said in phone interview. About 71 percent, or 767, of the company's 1,084 full-time employees work in Columbia, where the company moved its headquarters this month.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer Staff Writer Ian Johnson contributed to this report | October 19, 1993
The Arbitron Co. waved the white flag yesterday, saying it would close its money-losing television ratings business, and lay off 733 people -- 413 of them in the company's Laurel and Beltsville operations.The move left the television industry with only one major provider of information on who watches what programs -- A. C. Nielsen. The ratings are used by advertisers to determine how they should spend approximately $15 billion devoted to television spots each year.New York-based Arbitron would retain 407 workers in Maryland, and another 60 employees in other states to service the continuing radio-station ratings business, Executive Vice President Marshall L. Snyder said.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2001
As one of the nation's leading marketing and media research firms begins to trade its stock on the New York Stock Exchange, it is also expanding its Howard County presence into the Gateway office park. Arbitron Inc., best known for its measurement of local radio ratings, has moved into a 20,000- square-foot office on Alexander Bell Drive. The company also has a two-building campus off Snowden River Parkway. The expansion was precipitated by the March 30 reverse spinoff from its parent company Ceridian Corp.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | March 10, 2009
Media research firm Arbitron Inc. said yesterday that it is relocating its corporate headquarters from New York City to Columbia, where most of its employees work. Michael Skarzynski, Arbitron's president and chief executive officer, said in a statement that he and other executives should live and work in Columbia because it is where most of the company's research is done. "He wanted to be where the action is, where the people who will execute the decisions are," said Thom Mocarsky, an Arbitron spokesman.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 26, 2007
This week's version of a light bulb joke: How many sports media columnists does it take to screw up a report on radio ratings? Answer: See picture above. Last week, I said Ravens regular-season games on WBAL (1090 AM) and 98 Rock (WIYY/97.9 FM) in 2006 drew more listeners than the games on JACKfm (WQSR/102.7 FM) and ESPN Radio 1300 (WJFK/1300 AM) in 2005. Which is true. But that may be all I got right. According to numbers compiled by Arbitron, the radio ratings service, WBAL/98 Rock averaged 166,300 Baltimore-area listeners 18 and older for each game.
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