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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 3, 2001
ABOARD THE USS PELELIU - Marine Cpl. Curtis Holmes will never forget the last night of leave in Darwin, Australia, when a staff sergeant barked at him to get back to the ship, telling him the twin towers were gone, the Pentagon was hit and the Peleliu was leaving early the next morning. "I thought it was a hoax," Holmes, 21, of Landover, Md., recalled yesterday while sitting in the ship's mess. "I started to walk back and people kept yelling, `Everyone to the ship, now.'" Cabs pulled over.
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NEWS
May 9, 2011
I completely disagree with Alan Eason ("After bin Laden, a time for reflection," May 6) and side strongly with Midshipman Hans Vreeland ("Midshipman: This is why we celebrated bin Laden death," May 6) and his comparison of the celebration by midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy to that of the munchkins in the Wizard of Oz after Dorothy's house crushes the Wicked Witch of the East. The spontaneous celebration was appropriate. Like many on the far left, Mr. Eason doesn't seem to get it. Osama bin Laden was the epitome of pure evil, and his innermost desire was to kill every American including Mr. Eason.
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NEWS
April 26, 1993
MATTHEW COYLE, 10, son of Richard and Melissa Coyle and brother of Megan Coyle, of Mystic Woods Court in Mount Airy.School: Fourth-grader at Mount Airy Elementary School.Honored for: Being the top Carroll County scorer in the statewide geography bee held April 2 at Bowie State University.Matthew was especially disappointed because he still believes his last answer was right, even though the judges said it was wrong.He had made it through preliminary rounds until a tiebreaker question between him and two other boys was asked.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 1, 2001
WITH THE MARINES IN AFGHANISTAN - Last night, haunting beauty and inherent mystery mixed under an autumn sky in a patch of desert that is now a temporary home to the Marines. A near full moon cast a halo and shed light on a packed-sand landing strip, the entry point for any visitor to this faraway place on the front line of America's global war against terrorism, the Taliban and Osama bin Laden. Giant cargo planes bumped and rattled across the cracked, pocked desert airstrip, a dry lake bed, the C-17s and C-130s stirring up great dust clouds that move ominously and coat every surface for miles.
NEWS
May 9, 2011
I completely disagree with Alan Eason ("After bin Laden, a time for reflection," May 6) and side strongly with Midshipman Hans Vreeland ("Midshipman: This is why we celebrated bin Laden death," May 6) and his comparison of the celebration by midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy to that of the munchkins in the Wizard of Oz after Dorothy's house crushes the Wicked Witch of the East. The spontaneous celebration was appropriate. Like many on the far left, Mr. Eason doesn't seem to get it. Osama bin Laden was the epitome of pure evil, and his innermost desire was to kill every American including Mr. Eason.
NEWS
By David Morrison | November 4, 1990
Washington With not a shot fired in anger, 42 uniformed Americans have died in accidents in the Persian Gulf region since Operation Desert Shield kicked off in early August -- 19 more than U.S. fatalities in the December 1989 invasion of Panama.This is hardly the first time that realistic combat training exercises have exacted a heavy toll. From 1979 to 1989, more than 15,000 soldiers, sailors and fliers have been killed in training accidents -- almost half the number of U.S. battlefield deaths in Korea.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Tom Bowman and David L. Greene and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 22, 2001
WASHINGTON - Buoyed by military victories against the crippled Taliban, President Bush sent a blunt warning to other nations yesterday that Afghanistan was "just the beginning" and that the United States would be combating terrorism "across the world and across the years." The president, appearing before a raucous crowd of 10,000 soldiers at Fort Campbell, Ky., home of the Army's 101st Airborne Division, urged Americans to be patient. The war in Afghanistan is far from over, he said, adding that U.S. forces were intensifying their efforts to find Osama bin Laden and to dismantle his scattered terrorist cells "piece by piece."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 20, 2001
WASHINGTON - The new war against terrorism could well begin in the dun-colored mountains and the ancient cities of Afghanistan. Cruise missiles fired from Navy ships in the Arabian Sea strike military and political targets, while F-18 attack aircraft screech through the skies and unleash precision bombs. High-flying B-1 bombers unleash a huge cargo of munitions that obliterates portions of the landscape. In the Afghan hills, Arabic-speaking Green Berets from Fort Campbell, Ky., call in airstrikes against terrorist camps or link up with guerrilla fighters for the first time since the Vietnam War. Overhead, small, unmanned drones make long, lazy loops, broadcasting live pictures to commanders, while lumbering spy aircraft zap ground radar installations and vacuum up enemy radio signals.
FEATURES
By Julie Skurdenis | November 10, 1991
The sights of northern India appear on most travelers' must-see lists: the glittering Taj Mahal, devout pilgrims bathing at dawn in the Ganges at Varanasi, the resplendent palaces of the maharajahs at Udaipur and Jaipur.But it is in South India that the true heart of India beats. It is this portion of the subcontinent that most travelers to India never see. Stretching from the Arabian Sea in the west to the Bay of Bengal in the east, it is a land of startling contrasts. Palm-fringed beaches line both the western Malabar coast and the eastern Coromandel coast.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 1, 2001
WITH THE MARINES IN AFGHANISTAN - Last night, haunting beauty and inherent mystery mixed under an autumn sky in a patch of desert that is now a temporary home to the Marines. A near full moon cast a halo and shed light on a packed-sand landing strip, the entry point for any visitor to this faraway place on the front line of America's global war against terrorism, the Taliban and Osama bin Laden. Giant cargo planes bumped and rattled across the cracked, pocked desert airstrip, a dry lake bed, the C-17s and C-130s stirring up great dust clouds that move ominously and coat every surface for miles.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Tom Bowman and David L. Greene and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 22, 2001
WASHINGTON - Buoyed by military victories against the crippled Taliban, President Bush sent a blunt warning to other nations yesterday that Afghanistan was "just the beginning" and that the United States would be combating terrorism "across the world and across the years." The president, appearing before a raucous crowd of 10,000 soldiers at Fort Campbell, Ky., home of the Army's 101st Airborne Division, urged Americans to be patient. The war in Afghanistan is far from over, he said, adding that U.S. forces were intensifying their efforts to find Osama bin Laden and to dismantle his scattered terrorist cells "piece by piece."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 9, 2001
ABOARD THE USS PELELIU -- The old slogan "Loose Lips Sink Ships" flashed on television sets throughout this amphibious assault ship as it cruised the Arabian Sea this week. Sailors and Marines weren't just warned to keep a lid on information -- they were reminded to watch their e-mail, too. And if they had any doubts about the information they might be passing on to their families, the commodore of Amphibious Squadron One said he told them to follow a simple rule: Don't write anything they wouldn't want to see in a big-city newspaper.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 3, 2001
ABOARD THE USS PELELIU - Marine Cpl. Curtis Holmes will never forget the last night of leave in Darwin, Australia, when a staff sergeant barked at him to get back to the ship, telling him the twin towers were gone, the Pentagon was hit and the Peleliu was leaving early the next morning. "I thought it was a hoax," Holmes, 21, of Landover, Md., recalled yesterday while sitting in the ship's mess. "I started to walk back and people kept yelling, `Everyone to the ship, now.'" Cabs pulled over.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 20, 2001
WASHINGTON - The new war against terrorism could well begin in the dun-colored mountains and the ancient cities of Afghanistan. Cruise missiles fired from Navy ships in the Arabian Sea strike military and political targets, while F-18 attack aircraft screech through the skies and unleash precision bombs. High-flying B-1 bombers unleash a huge cargo of munitions that obliterates portions of the landscape. In the Afghan hills, Arabic-speaking Green Berets from Fort Campbell, Ky., call in airstrikes against terrorist camps or link up with guerrilla fighters for the first time since the Vietnam War. Overhead, small, unmanned drones make long, lazy loops, broadcasting live pictures to commanders, while lumbering spy aircraft zap ground radar installations and vacuum up enemy radio signals.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The attacks unleashed by the United States yesterday were achieved with scores of Navy missiles -- each weighing 2,650 pounds and with a range of 1,000 miles -- fired from ships in the Arabian Sea and Red Sea, government sources said.Defense officials provided few details of the strikes. But government sources, speaking on condition of anonymity, said yesterday it was exclusively a Navy effort that involved 75 to 100 cruise missiles and no aircraft.The simultaneous missile attacks, which began about 1: 30 p.m. EDT, targeted alleged terrorist training sites in a remote region of Afghanistan south of Kabul, and an alleged chemical weapons site in an industrial area south of Khartoum, Sudan.
NEWS
April 26, 1993
MATTHEW COYLE, 10, son of Richard and Melissa Coyle and brother of Megan Coyle, of Mystic Woods Court in Mount Airy.School: Fourth-grader at Mount Airy Elementary School.Honored for: Being the top Carroll County scorer in the statewide geography bee held April 2 at Bowie State University.Matthew was especially disappointed because he still believes his last answer was right, even though the judges said it was wrong.He had made it through preliminary rounds until a tiebreaker question between him and two other boys was asked.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 9, 2001
ABOARD THE USS PELELIU -- The old slogan "Loose Lips Sink Ships" flashed on television sets throughout this amphibious assault ship as it cruised the Arabian Sea this week. Sailors and Marines weren't just warned to keep a lid on information -- they were reminded to watch their e-mail, too. And if they had any doubts about the information they might be passing on to their families, the commodore of Amphibious Squadron One said he told them to follow a simple rule: Don't write anything they wouldn't want to see in a big-city newspaper.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The attacks unleashed by the United States yesterday were achieved with scores of Navy missiles -- each weighing 2,650 pounds and with a range of 1,000 miles -- fired from ships in the Arabian Sea and Red Sea, government sources said.Defense officials provided few details of the strikes. But government sources, speaking on condition of anonymity, said yesterday it was exclusively a Navy effort that involved 75 to 100 cruise missiles and no aircraft.The simultaneous missile attacks, which began about 1: 30 p.m. EDT, targeted alleged terrorist training sites in a remote region of Afghanistan south of Kabul, and an alleged chemical weapons site in an industrial area south of Khartoum, Sudan.
FEATURES
By Julie Skurdenis | November 10, 1991
The sights of northern India appear on most travelers' must-see lists: the glittering Taj Mahal, devout pilgrims bathing at dawn in the Ganges at Varanasi, the resplendent palaces of the maharajahs at Udaipur and Jaipur.But it is in South India that the true heart of India beats. It is this portion of the subcontinent that most travelers to India never see. Stretching from the Arabian Sea in the west to the Bay of Bengal in the east, it is a land of startling contrasts. Palm-fringed beaches line both the western Malabar coast and the eastern Coromandel coast.
NEWS
By David Morrison | November 4, 1990
Washington With not a shot fired in anger, 42 uniformed Americans have died in accidents in the Persian Gulf region since Operation Desert Shield kicked off in early August -- 19 more than U.S. fatalities in the December 1989 invasion of Panama.This is hardly the first time that realistic combat training exercises have exacted a heavy toll. From 1979 to 1989, more than 15,000 soldiers, sailors and fliers have been killed in training accidents -- almost half the number of U.S. battlefield deaths in Korea.
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