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Arabian Nights

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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
With "Prince of Persia," producer Jerry Bruckheimer must be hoping that he can once again bring back a lost world of movie fantasy. Will it do for Arabian Nights adventures what "Pirates of the Caribbean" did for pirate movies? It's based on a video game, not a theme-park ride, but it follows the same formula: Boil down a genre's main ingredients and mix them with a newfangled star, in this case Jake Gyllenhaal, not Johnny Depp. Arabian Nights movies have always been filled with scrappy gutter waifs, scheming royal advisers, heroic or ignoble princes and princesses, daft or deadly monarchs, and otherworldly demons, as well as concepts like "the Sands of Time."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2011
The centuries-old classic formally known as "The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night" presents one of the great plot devices: Young maiden Scheherezade escapes murder at the hands of King Shahryar by telling him riveting, to-be-continued stories. In 1992, Mary Zimmerman adapted this material into a colorful work, "The Arabian Nights," which has settled into Arena Stage with a dynamic cast and a fabulous collection of rugs. It's a long show (you may start to feel as if you will have to spend 1,001 nights in the theater)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By sam sessa and sam sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | November 13, 2008
For years, Zeeba Lounge has been in a league of its own. When it debuted in 2004, it was Baltimore's first hookah bar. Even though a handful of other hookah bars have sprung up around town, Zeeba is still the city's swankiest spot for puffing flavored tobacco through big glass water pipes. And it's indisputably in demand: On Friday and Saturday nights, lines routinely snake out the door and onto the sidewalk. A few years back, a hookah bar called Three Kings of Egypt opened right across Light Street from Zeeba.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
With "Prince of Persia," producer Jerry Bruckheimer must be hoping that he can once again bring back a lost world of movie fantasy. Will it do for Arabian Nights adventures what "Pirates of the Caribbean" did for pirate movies? It's based on a video game, not a theme-park ride, but it follows the same formula: Boil down a genre's main ingredients and mix them with a newfangled star, in this case Jake Gyllenhaal, not Johnny Depp. Arabian Nights movies have always been filled with scrappy gutter waifs, scheming royal advisers, heroic or ignoble princes and princesses, daft or deadly monarchs, and otherworldly demons, as well as concepts like "the Sands of Time."
NEWS
By KATHY SUTPHIN | April 30, 1993
There's no need to rub a magic lamp to discover the treasur of prizes, favorite foods and exciting experiences that awaits South Carroll High School juniors and seniors who attend the 1993 "Arabian Nights" After-Prom Party.A $3 ticket is all that is needed to open the doors to the celebration at the Four Seasons Sports Complex in Hampstead. Tickets for the party are on sale at the school, said event co-chairman Ann Laur.The drug- and alcohol-free event, sponsored by the South Carroll Parent Involvement Committee, will be held from midnight to 6 a.m. The party is open to students and their dates who attend the prom on May 8 as well as to all South Carroll juniors and seniors.
NEWS
By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 20, 2006
Romance and excitement are included in the price of your ticket at the Arabian Nights concert of the Columbia Orchestra at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School in Columbia., The two pieces on the program -- Rimsky-Korsakov's popular Scheherazade and Tan Dun's Paper Concerto for Paper Percussion and Orchestra -- share the ability to create a variety of moods, and, to a certain extent, share the moods they create. Scheherazade, based on the tales of the Arabian Nights, is the story of a very clever young woman who becomes the wife of a powerful sultan.
FEATURES
By Cathy Collison and Cathy Collison,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 10, 1993
You've seen "Aladdin" the movie, but have you read the book?While Disney's blockbuster is setting records at the box office, some book publishers are expecting it to spur sales of Aladdin collections. After all, Disney's "The Little Mermaid" and "Beauty and the Beast" created a fresh market for those European folk tales.In fact, "When you talk to kids, they think Disney is the author of everything," says folklorist and author Eric Kimmel, who teaches children's literature at Portland State University and has just written a new version of the Aladdin tale.
NEWS
By Alison Cave and Alison Cave,Special to The Sun | February 5, 1995
Through a retelling of the classic, "A Thousand and One Nights," Egyptian Nobel laureate Naguib Mahfouz weaves a tale of politics, religion, murder and mayhem. "Arabian Nights and Days," originally published in Arabic in 1982, mirrors the current political turmoil in Egypt, and gives insight into the undercurrents of political repression and religious rebellion in other parts of the Arab World.Peopled with familiar characters from "A Thousand and One Nights," the novel revolves around vignettes about the residents in a quarter of a medieval Islamic city, and their interactions with the government, in the form of the sultan Shahriyar and his deputies.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | November 22, 2006
With its swirling instrumental colors and irresistible surges of melody spinning out musical "Tales of the Arabian Nights," Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade is one of the most exotic, best-loved orchestral showpieces of them all. True to the work's pictorial elements, the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's performance of Rimsky-Korsakov's exotic masterwork Saturday evening provided an interesting portrait of where the ASO stands in Year Two of conductor...
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 11, 2004
Claudia Stevens timed the premiere of her one-woman show, The Poisoner on the Train, to coincide with the anniversary of Sept. 11. And the performer's latest monologue with music is surely one of the more eclectic, idiosyncratic works of art to emerge on that subject to date. The impetus for the piece was a conversation Stevens had with a stranger who sat next to her on a train trip from her home in Richmond, Va., in early 2002. The man - whom she dubs "The Poisoner" - claimed that, as a former member of the cult of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, he participated in and served time for the 1984 salmonella poisonings of 750 people at salad bars in Oregon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | March 5, 2009
The owners of El Basha couldn't have picked a worse spot to open a hookah bar. I hate to say it, but it's true. It's almost unfathomable to think that a brand-new hookah bar like El Basha can sustain itself in downtown Baltimore, a stone's throw from The Block. That's right, El Basha, which opened last month, is on Baltimore Street, just a block or two west of one of the city's seediest strips. It's a shame, because El Basha has a lot going for it. Most of the city's hookah bars are small and can feel cluttered.
ENTERTAINMENT
By sam sessa and sam sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | November 13, 2008
For years, Zeeba Lounge has been in a league of its own. When it debuted in 2004, it was Baltimore's first hookah bar. Even though a handful of other hookah bars have sprung up around town, Zeeba is still the city's swankiest spot for puffing flavored tobacco through big glass water pipes. And it's indisputably in demand: On Friday and Saturday nights, lines routinely snake out the door and onto the sidewalk. A few years back, a hookah bar called Three Kings of Egypt opened right across Light Street from Zeeba.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | November 22, 2006
With its swirling instrumental colors and irresistible surges of melody spinning out musical "Tales of the Arabian Nights," Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade is one of the most exotic, best-loved orchestral showpieces of them all. True to the work's pictorial elements, the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's performance of Rimsky-Korsakov's exotic masterwork Saturday evening provided an interesting portrait of where the ASO stands in Year Two of conductor...
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 16, 2006
Beginning Monday, Center Stage will present "First Look: Special Edition," a series of staged readings on three consecutive Mondays. The offerings include an epoch-spanning version of Arabian Nights and a dark comedy about female assassins. The "Special Edition" subtitle was added in part to reflect a youthful aesthetic, says Otis Ramsey-Zoe, Center Stage literary manager and coordinator of the series, which features the work of playwrights in their 20s and 30s. "The idea behind the `special editions' is that these are pieces that are challenging in form and content, somehow stretching the boundaries of what Center Stage normally would produce," he says.
NEWS
By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 20, 2006
Romance and excitement are included in the price of your ticket at the Arabian Nights concert of the Columbia Orchestra at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School in Columbia., The two pieces on the program -- Rimsky-Korsakov's popular Scheherazade and Tan Dun's Paper Concerto for Paper Percussion and Orchestra -- share the ability to create a variety of moods, and, to a certain extent, share the moods they create. Scheherazade, based on the tales of the Arabian Nights, is the story of a very clever young woman who becomes the wife of a powerful sultan.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 11, 2004
Claudia Stevens timed the premiere of her one-woman show, The Poisoner on the Train, to coincide with the anniversary of Sept. 11. And the performer's latest monologue with music is surely one of the more eclectic, idiosyncratic works of art to emerge on that subject to date. The impetus for the piece was a conversation Stevens had with a stranger who sat next to her on a train trip from her home in Richmond, Va., in early 2002. The man - whom she dubs "The Poisoner" - claimed that, as a former member of the cult of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, he participated in and served time for the 1984 salmonella poisonings of 750 people at salad bars in Oregon.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 29, 2000
It has been a dreadful network television season, and the malaise only deepens as we head into its final days, with the start of big-ticket May "sweeps" programming this weekend. Three very expensive productions from what were once known as the Big Three start tomorrow, and the toughest call for this critic is deciding which is worst: NBC's vapid miniseries "The '70s," CBS' weepy bio-pic on the life of John Denver, or another miniseries from the dreaded Robert Halmi Sr., who has gotten rich turning the Great Books into prime-time mush.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | March 5, 2009
The owners of El Basha couldn't have picked a worse spot to open a hookah bar. I hate to say it, but it's true. It's almost unfathomable to think that a brand-new hookah bar like El Basha can sustain itself in downtown Baltimore, a stone's throw from The Block. That's right, El Basha, which opened last month, is on Baltimore Street, just a block or two west of one of the city's seediest strips. It's a shame, because El Basha has a lot going for it. Most of the city's hookah bars are small and can feel cluttered.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 29, 2000
It has been a dreadful network television season, and the malaise only deepens as we head into its final days, with the start of big-ticket May "sweeps" programming this weekend. Three very expensive productions from what were once known as the Big Three start tomorrow, and the toughest call for this critic is deciding which is worst: NBC's vapid miniseries "The '70s," CBS' weepy bio-pic on the life of John Denver, or another miniseries from the dreaded Robert Halmi Sr., who has gotten rich turning the Great Books into prime-time mush.
NEWS
By Alison Cave and Alison Cave,Special to The Sun | February 5, 1995
Through a retelling of the classic, "A Thousand and One Nights," Egyptian Nobel laureate Naguib Mahfouz weaves a tale of politics, religion, murder and mayhem. "Arabian Nights and Days," originally published in Arabic in 1982, mirrors the current political turmoil in Egypt, and gives insight into the undercurrents of political repression and religious rebellion in other parts of the Arab World.Peopled with familiar characters from "A Thousand and One Nights," the novel revolves around vignettes about the residents in a quarter of a medieval Islamic city, and their interactions with the government, in the form of the sultan Shahriyar and his deputies.
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