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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2003
JERUSALEM - A pair of Arab-Israeli legislators who were declared enemies of the state and barred from running for re-election appeared before Israel's Supreme Court yesterday to argue for the right to campaign. Ahmad Tibi and Azmi Bishara were accused of supporting attacks against Israel and ousted from the elections, scheduled for Jan. 28. Their banishment set off a debate over free speech and discrimination in a nation that prides itself on its democratic rule. Israel's election committee said Bishara, a political philosopher at Birzeit University, had praised "popular resistance" during a speech in Syria.
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NEWS
November 7, 2013
On Nov. 5, my wife and I attended a rare public dialogue between Jews and Muslims at Columbia's Beth Shalom Congregation between Imam Yahya Hendi, Muslim chaplain at Georgetown University, and Rabbi Andrew Busch of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation. It is the first in a series of four Tuesday night discussions during November designed to explore the various aspects of the Arab-Israeli conflict. No reporters attended despite invitations, organizers said. In response to a question about how his message of personal good will and reconciliation might be spread more effectively, Imam Hendi recalled once being invited to appear on a network television show, but after a 35-minute "screening" interview, the show was canceled.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 11, 2001
ABU SNAN, Israel - Muhammed Saker Habashi became one of Israel's nightmares this week. The 48-year-old cement salesman killed three people and himself in a suicide bombing Sunday in the coastal town of Nahariya. But he was unlike the bombers that Israel has known before. He was not a Palestinian militant from the West Bank. He was an Israeli - one of 1.1 million Israeli citizens who are also Arabs - and the first Arab-Israeli to carry out a suicide bombing. He did not have to sneak past Israeli checkpoints to reach the crowded train platform where his bomb detonated, killing an elderly couple and a soldier, and injuring at least 85 others.
NEWS
October 18, 2011
Ross Singer's recent commentary revealed a truth that so many on either side of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict refuse to acknowledge ("Friend or foes? Oct. 17). When we get to know people as human beings, regardless of the side with which they identify, we learn that simplistic generalizations and platitudes about the "other" don't fit. The events leading up the establishment of the state of Israel and its aftermath require a much more nuanced reading than political and religious leaders on either side would have us believe.
NEWS
By Neil Hicks | April 6, 2001
WASHINGTON -- We are just beginning to see what a post-peace process Middle East might look like, and it is not a reassuring picture. President Bush heard directly for the first time about Arab concerns regarding the dangerous situation in the Middle East when he met earlier this week with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. Since taking office, the Bush administration has spoken of a need for a more balanced Middle East policy in which focus on the Arab-Israeli conflict will not be allowed to overwhelm other regional concerns, notably Iraq -- a Bush priority.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 7, 2003
TAYBEH, Israel - Potholes filled with rainwater and mud make the roads virtually impassable. Raw sewage runs through open ditches. Schools are overcrowded. Crime and drug abuse are soaring. The Arab-Israeli residents of this town, a rough-and-tumble collection of drab buildings where everything seems to be crumbling, find those problems far more compelling than the peculiar travails of fellow resident Ahmad Tibi, a member of Israel's parliament. Israel's central election committee barred Tibi last week from running in parliamentary elections Jan. 28, accusing him of supporting terrorist organizations that target Israel.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration sees the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights and enmity toward the Palestine Liberation Organization among moderate Arab regimes as potentially fruitful avenues to restarting the Arab-Israeli peace process, a senior administration official says.The Golan Heights, which Israel occupied during the 1967 war and annexed in 1981, is an "interesting area for diplomacy," the official said. A deal between Syria and Israel "ought to be potentially doable."The PLO's disfavor among the gulf states and in Egypt because of its recent support of Iraq could be an avenue to explore in solving the Palestinian conflict, the official suggested.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Even if everything goes right for Madeleine K. Albright with the Israelis and Palestinians -- an unlikely prospect -- the secretary of state will confront an array of tough problems and skeptical leaders elsewhere on her first Middle East trip, which starts today.Seldom since the end of the Persian Gulf war in 1991 has such a level of strains existed between Arabs and Israelis and between Arabs and the United States, analysts say.Moreover, some Arab countries are beginning to make friendly gestures toward America's two nemeses, Iran and Iraq.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | July 29, 1995
QABATIYA, Israeli-Occupied West Bank -- Defeated in battle, humiliated under occupation, the Abdel Rahman al-Nasser now faces an uncertain fate in peace.The al-Nasser is a Jordanian tank, captured in the 1967 Arab-Israeli War and forced for 28 years to be part of a monument to the Israeli victory in a tank battle at this village outside Jenin.The question is, when the Israelis withdraw from the West Bank, will they take the Abdel Rahman al-Nasser?"It has to be moved," said Uri Hurvitz, 68, who was deputy commander of the 45th Israeli brigade, the unit that captured this part of the West Bank.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | July 14, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush, moving to jump-start the Middle East peace process with the help of a more receptive Israeli government, will send Secretary of State James A. Baker III to the region this weekend.Mr. Bush also has invited Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin to Kennebunkport, Maine, next month, it was announced yesterday.Mr. Bush spoke by telephone with Mr. Rabin yesterday as Israel's Parliament formally installed the new Labor-led government. A White House statement said Mr. Rabin voiced a desire to give new momentum to the peace process.
NEWS
June 16, 2009
Progress in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict tends to be painfully incremental. But marginal progress is better than none at all, which is why Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's announcement Sunday that he is willing to accept a Palestinian state is a welcome development - even if it doesn't go nearly far enough. With Mr. Netanyahu's speech, a milestone has been reached. From this day forward, there can no longer be any serious debate about whether a Palestinian state will (or should)
NEWS
By Aaron David Miller | January 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Having worked for six secretaries of state on Arab-Israeli negotiations, I nearly fell off my chair the other day when I read Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice's comment to reporters that diplomacy wasn't about making deals. Maybe "making deals" is too glib a phrase for her, but it's precisely what effective American diplomacy in the Middle East is mostly about. Her legacy may well be judged by that standard. The secretary is absolutely correct in asserting, as she did, that diplomacy is more than deal-making.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 18, 2005
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - Israeli and Palestinian officials are warning that Iran is actively working to promote violence here and undermine chances for an Arab-Israeli peace settlement. Palestinian officials, usually reluctant to acknowledge external threats, say privately they are worried that Iran has a growing involvement. Israeli military intelligence officials say that militant Palestinian cells are receiving money and arms indirectly supplied by Iran, through neighboring Syria and Lebanon.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 3, 2005
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas agreed yesterday to meet in Egypt on Tuesday along with the leaders of Egypt and Jordan, in an apparent breakthrough in relations between Israel and its Arab neighbors. The Israeli and Palestinian leaders were invited by Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, whose aides are also trying to mediate a cease-fire among Palestinian militant groups. The meeting, to be held in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, also marks the steadily warming contacts between Israel and Egypt.
NEWS
By Shibley Telhami | May 9, 2003
THE BUSH administration's dilemma is clear as Secretary of State Colin L. Powell travels to Israel and the West Bank to push for implementation of the "road map" that the administration has unveiled with Russia, the Europeans and the United Nations. On one side, President Bush has stated that he is personally committed to establishing a Palestinian state within three years and to the road map drawn up to get there. This commitment binds him publicly at home and abroad, where the United States has been accused of not following through on the Arab-Israeli conflict.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2003
JERUSALEM - A pair of Arab-Israeli legislators who were declared enemies of the state and barred from running for re-election appeared before Israel's Supreme Court yesterday to argue for the right to campaign. Ahmad Tibi and Azmi Bishara were accused of supporting attacks against Israel and ousted from the elections, scheduled for Jan. 28. Their banishment set off a debate over free speech and discrimination in a nation that prides itself on its democratic rule. Israel's election committee said Bishara, a political philosopher at Birzeit University, had praised "popular resistance" during a speech in Syria.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | May 30, 2002
WASHINGTON - It's clear now that the Israeli-Palestinian clashes that erupted in the spring of 2002 qualify as the sixth Arab-Israeli war - going down in history with the 1948, 1956, 1967, 1973 and 1982 wars. The 2002 war doesn't have a proper name yet (the Suicide War?). But like all previous Arab-Israeli wars, it is having a proper aftermath - shaking up Arab, Israeli and Palestinian politics as much as the five previous wars did. Let's start with the Palestinians. Well before this war there was already bubbling Palestinian criticism that their "Al Aqsa intifada" had no clearly defined goals and that Yasser Arafat, instead of developing them, was just surfing on his people's anger and trying to direct it away from his own misrule.
NEWS
By New York Times | September 24, 1991
ALGIERS, Algeria -- Yasser Arafat, chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization, is expressing support for American efforts to convene a Middle East peace conference, but is offering no specific concessions to meet Israeli demands for Palestinian attendance at such a gathering.Addressing 450 delegates at the opening yesterday of a meeting of the Palestine National Council, the PLO's parliament, Arafat apparently tried to strike a balance between moderates within his organization who want compromise with the United States on the peace talks and hard-liners opposed to any concessions to Israel.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 7, 2003
TAYBEH, Israel - Potholes filled with rainwater and mud make the roads virtually impassable. Raw sewage runs through open ditches. Schools are overcrowded. Crime and drug abuse are soaring. The Arab-Israeli residents of this town, a rough-and-tumble collection of drab buildings where everything seems to be crumbling, find those problems far more compelling than the peculiar travails of fellow resident Ahmad Tibi, a member of Israel's parliament. Israel's central election committee barred Tibi last week from running in parliamentary elections Jan. 28, accusing him of supporting terrorist organizations that target Israel.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 2002
JERUSALEM - Touching off a divisive national debate, the government of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has endorsed a proposed law that would allow Jews to bar Arab citizens of Israel from living in or buying homes in many Israeli communities. The attempt to legalize "Jews-only" towns was swiftly criticized by numerous Israeli politicians and human rights groups, who said it is a discriminatory and racist proposal. Supporters praised the law for protecting what they called the essence of Zionism.
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