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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | May 13, 1991
Stepping up efforts to win business in Kuwait, Marylan companies will exhibit goods ranging from poultry to dredging ,, equipment at an American products trade show this week in the United Arab Emirates.About 25 Maryland businessmen are in Dubai to market their goods in an effort coordinated by the Kuwait Maryland Partnership, said William Touchard, the organization's vice president. In addition, the products of another 25 state companies are being marketed by members of the partnership, who are distributing company brochures and leaflets.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
The jockey had raced an Arabian horse only once before and had never met the trainer before. The trainer, a former jockey himself, has never actually mounted an Arabian. The owner is an 18-year-old Shiek who, according to the trainer, knows very little about horses, even Arabians. Experience seemed to be insignificant when it comes to T M Fred Texas, the 5-year-old Arabian who followed a world championship in Dubai in March with a victory Saturday in the first President of United Emirates Cup at Pimlico Race Course . T M Texas paid $4.40.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1998
Adnan Obaid Mohamed Al Zaabi thinks his country has a car theft problem. But the United Arab Emirates only has a handful every few months.While Zaabi believes homicide is a troubling issue, his tiny desert nation averages only one a year.So when the 33-year-old police captain from Abu Dhabi went for a ride with Baltimore police this week, he got a lesson in big-city crime.In four hours Wednesday, he accompanied police responding to a mugging and to a family squabble, went on a drug raid and watched an officer fight a bureaucracy that couldn't tell him whether his department had towed a 1986 Toyota.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | December 6, 2009
Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, is sometimes upstaged by its neighbor, the uber glitzy Dubai, but that may be coming to an end as concerns about Dubai's debts grow. Abu Dhabi is expected to provide fiscal stability in the region, perhaps garnering more attention from tourists who prefer not worrying about the economic situation. And it can't hurt that Frommer's has named the city a top destination for 2010. Here are five things to do: 1 Get lost in a mosque : Visit Sheikh Zayed Mosque, one of the largest mosques in the world.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1998
Lockheed Martin Corp. failed to hit the target yesterday for the fifth straight time with a high-profile Army missile system that it spent the past year trying to perfect. The $12 million test lasted 5.8 seconds.The failure of the system, which has come under harsh congressional scrutiny as a symbol of trouble in the nation's ballistic missile defense program, marred what could have been a grand day for the Bethesda company.Several hours after the disastrous New Mexico flight test, the United Arab Emirates agreed to a major purchase of F-16 fighter planes.
NEWS
By U.S. Central Command, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia | February 25, 1991
These are the forces participating in the effort to push Iraqi troops out of Kuwait:Land forcesUnited States, Britain, Saudi Arabia, France, Bahrain, United Arab Emirates, Oman, Qatar, Syria, Kuwait, Egypt.Air forcesUnited States, Britain, Saudi Arabia, Italy, Kuwait, Canada, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Qatar.Naval forcesUnited States, Britain, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | January 12, 1994
PARAMUS, N.J. -- Toys "R" Us Inc. said it will open 115 new company-owned stores and expand into the Middle East with franchised stores in 1994 as part of the largest expansion program in the company's history.In addition, the toy company said that it will make an investment of another sort by repurchasing $1 billion of its common stock.The world's largest children's specialty retailing chain recently created a franchising division to enable it to accelerate the expansion of the Toys "R" Us concept throughout the world.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | January 10, 1995
ALMOST EVERYTHING Americans buy is now made outside America. You knew that long ago. I knew it too, but I hadn't really believed it until various women took me shopping in December.This meant killing time in women's wear divisions of assorted marts. What a learning experience these marts afforded. I'd heard that marts were taking over the world, but I had never thought enough about marts to ask, "What is a mart anyhow?"Nothing beats on-site inspection. As a result I now know that a mart is a store selling goods made almost exclusively in Asia and Central America.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 2008
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates -- President Bush called Iran "the world's leading state sponsor of terror" and sought yesterday to shore up opposition to the government in Tehran throughout the Middle East. But even as he criticized Iranian leaders, saying they were seeking to repress their own citizens and to cow neighboring countries, Bush appealed to U.S. allies in the region to open up their own political and economic systems to greater democracy. Iran, meanwhile, promised the head of the United Nation's nuclear watchdog agency yesterday that it will answer all remaining questions about its past nuclear activities within four weeks, including secret activities the United States suspects were linked to a weapons program.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 4, 1995
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- As the United States moves to further isolate what it regards as the outlaw regime in Iran, it is finding it difficult to recruit to the cause those countries seemingly most directly threatened, the oil-rich Arab states on the Persian Gulf.Out on what one Arab official calls "the front line" of potential confrontation with Tehran, the United States' allies in the Persian Gulf war -- Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman and the United Arab Emirates -- are pursuing their own policies on Iran, and not always in step with Washington.
TRAVEL
By Toni Salama and Toni Salama,Chicago Tribune | March 16, 2008
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- There was a haze in the air. Almost as heavy as fog, it was drawn forth by a heat that sapped the very strength of the sea itself. I got out of the tourmaline green water and stood on the sand feeling breathless. It was broad daylight, and as I fixed my gaze, I saw ghosts in the distance, the outline of buildings, buildings, buildings. And among them construction cranes, one-armed wizards there to bid them grow, to multiply. I had been swimming just down the beach from the Burj Al Arab, the sail-shaped hotel, tallest in the world.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 2008
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates -- President Bush called Iran "the world's leading state sponsor of terror" and sought yesterday to shore up opposition to the government in Tehran throughout the Middle East. But even as he criticized Iranian leaders, saying they were seeking to repress their own citizens and to cow neighboring countries, Bush appealed to U.S. allies in the region to open up their own political and economic systems to greater democracy. Iran, meanwhile, promised the head of the United Nation's nuclear watchdog agency yesterday that it will answer all remaining questions about its past nuclear activities within four weeks, including secret activities the United States suspects were linked to a weapons program.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2007
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- A senior Iranian military official said yesterday that his country had drawn up plans to launch airstrikes against Israel in case of war between the two countries, according to an interview published by an Iranian news agency. Gen. Mohammed Alavi, a deputy commander in the Iranian air force, told the semi-official Fars News Agency that his country could attack Israel with long-range missiles as well as fighter planes in case of war between the two countries.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Alexandra Zavis and Peter Spiegel and Alexandra Zavis,Los Angeles Times | August 3, 2007
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates -- Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates acknowledged yesterday that the Bush administration underestimated the difficulty of getting a political truce in Iraq, where the government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has been crippled by a walkout of Sunni Muslim ministers. Gates insisted that he was optimistic about military progress in several Iraqi regions, particularly western Anbar province, once a haven for insurgents. But he said he was discouraged by the inability of Iraq's Shiite-led government to reach a compromise on legislation aimed at reconciling the country's ethnic and sectarian groups.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | December 25, 2006
MIAMI -- The rich rulers of the United Arab Emirates might be fans of camel racing, but the sheiks say they don't enslave children as riders for their country's popular sport. On Friday, they launched a legal and media counteroffensive against a lawsuit filed this fall in Miami federal court that accused them of forcing boys to become jockeys. Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum, the UAE prime minister, and his brother, Sheik Hamdan bin Rashid al Maktoum, the emirates' finance minister, sought the dismissal of the proposed class action case and unveiled a Web page, www.dubai cameljockeys.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | February 27, 2006
ATLANTA -- President Bush turns out to be a great professor of politics. His lessons - he teaches through example - have become essential political wisdom. He taught Americans that all Arabs are alike by toppling Saddam Hussein, who had nothing to do with the terrorist atrocities of 9/11. Mr. Bush taught us that in the pursuit of power, politics trumps principle. So you never risk alienating the part of your base that's loony and hateful by publicly criticizing their xenophobia. And the president taught us that a war on terror can cover a lot of ground.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 2006
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates --A succession crisis in Kuwait continued yesterday, as the country's Cabinet began proceedings to remove the new emir, who is ailing. The extraordinary move occurred amid growing concern over who should lead the oil-rich city-state after the death of Emir Sheik Jaber al-Ahmad al-Sabah on Jan. 15. The crown prince, Sheik Saad al-Abdullah al-Sabah, believed to be 76, became emir under the constitution, and he has insisted that parliament call a special session to allow him to take the oath of office.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2007
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- A senior Iranian military official said yesterday that his country had drawn up plans to launch airstrikes against Israel in case of war between the two countries, according to an interview published by an Iranian news agency. Gen. Mohammed Alavi, a deputy commander in the Iranian air force, told the semi-official Fars News Agency that his country could attack Israel with long-range missiles as well as fighter planes in case of war between the two countries.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | February 24, 2006
Days after Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said he was exploring options to block the sale of port of Baltimore operations to a United Arab Emirates company, members of his administration said the governor has no position on whether the deal should go through. The sale of operations contracts for six East Coast ports, strongly backed by the Bush administration, has riled members of both parties in Congress and in state and local governments. On Wednesday, Mayor Martin O'Malley sent Ehrlich a letter asking that he co-sign an appeal to Bush to stop the deal, but Ehrlich press secretary Greg Massoni said the governor wouldn't do so. "It's a political document," Massoni said yesterday.
NEWS
February 22, 2006
Dangerous to allow Dubai firm at ports It's sickening to contemplate that operations at the port of Baltimore may fall into the hands of the United Arab Emirates ("Terms of ports deal are faulted," Feb. 20). What a mockery this makes of homeland security and our war on terror. The UAE borders on Saudi Arabia, the country from which most of the 9/11 terrorists came. Even though this modern and progressive nation may pose little threat at the moment, lethal organizations with knowledge of that country's language and customs could infiltrate Dubai Ports World and Baltimore's maritime infrastructure.
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