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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 1998
MEXICO CITY -- In a plaza next to one of this city's most important shrines, the colossal Monument to the Revolution, a humble water pipe has become a curious monument of its own to what is, literally, Mexico City's continuing collapse.Flush with the ground in 1934 when the Monument to the Revolution was built, the water pipe now soars 26 feet into the air. Firmly anchored in a hard layer of subsoil beneath the city's shallow aquifer, the pipe has stayed put in the last six decades while the city has fallen away.
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NEWS
Donald C. Helm | October 31, 2013
Large-scale plans for hydraulic fracturing and natural gas export in Maryland have recently been set in motion. From my vantage point as a scientist, let me point to clear dangers in hydrofracking. A physical process occurs that is overlooked by methane gas developers. This overlooked process is the upward migration of fractures from depth. A breakthrough in understanding this physical process came with the publication of an award winning paper entitled "Hydraulic forces that play a role in generating fissures at depth" by D.C. Helm, published in the Bulletin of the Association of Engineering Geologists.
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NEWS
February 6, 1998
Mount Airy will spend up to $3,000 to have an engineer study whether an 80-acre town-owned property could be developed without damage to an aquifer that supplies a town well.A citizens committee has been working to persuade school and recreation officials to build a high school and a recreation center there since last summer, when residents identified the two facilities as their top priorities.The town bought the steeply sloping property in Frederick County northwest of the West Ridge subdivision eight years ago to acquire an additional water supply well.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
The purity of well water in southwest Odenton has again fallen into question as recent tests by state and federal regulators revealed unsafe levels of lead in the drinking water at five residences. Three weeks ago, health and environmental regulators tested water at 13 homes for two cancer-causing pollutants, which officials discovered last year in dangerous levels at a nearby aquifer under Fort Meade. The March tests at the residences turned up safe levels of the two chemicals - but uncovered high lead levels, which county health officials say are likely attributable to aging plumbing systems.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
HEBRON -- A group of area residents protested the planned expansion of a rubble pit that sits over a large aquifer in rural Wicomico County yesterday, chanting, carrying signs and briefly blocking 20-ton trucks from entering the facility."
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | June 16, 1994
Giant Food has decided to test how well spring water drawn from beneath a Clarksville farm sells in 10 of its stores.The water bottled and marketed under the Taro Spring Water brand name began showing up on select Giant stores this week, said Robin Keren, gourmet food buyer for the chain."
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
The purity of well water in southwest Odenton has again fallen into question as recent tests by state and federal regulators revealed unsafe levels of lead in the drinking water at five residences. Three weeks ago, health and environmental regulators tested water at 13 homes for two cancer-causing pollutants, which officials discovered last year in dangerous levels at a nearby aquifer under Fort Meade. The March tests at the residences turned up safe levels of the two chemicals - but uncovered high lead levels, which county health officials say are likely attributable to aging plumbing systems.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
The purity of well water in southwest Odenton has again fallen into question as recent tests by state and federal regulators revealed unsafe levels of lead in the drinking water at five residences. Three weeks ago, health and environmental regulators tested water at 13 homes for two cancer-causing pollutants, which officials discovered last year in dangerous levels at a nearby aquifer under Fort Meade. The March tests at the residences turned up safe levels of the two chemicals - but uncovered high lead levels, which county health officials say are likely attributable to aging plumbing systems.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2005
Anne Arundel County officials will sample well water next week at 19 homes adjacent to Fort Meade after the discovery of cancer-causing pollutants in an aquifer underneath the sprawling Army post. The county learned recently that Army tests done in June at three wells near an aquifer revealed excessive levels of tetrachloroethene, a dry-cleaning solution, and carbon tetrachloride, a pesticide. The chemical levels were as much as four times the federal government's contamination standards.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 17, 1992
It is called a "ring of crisis."This ring's darkened boundaries mark a huge and populous area within which southern New Jersey residents are drinking and flushing and lawn-watering and car-washing and bathing themselves to death.They are sucking their water wells dry.And they know it.What they don't know -- or, at least, don't agree on -- is what to do about it.Potential solutions abound. But each one is costly.State officials first tried forcing cuts in water usage. A court said they couldn't do that.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
The purity of well water in southwest Odenton has again fallen into question as recent tests by state and federal regulators revealed unsafe levels of lead in the drinking water at five residences. Three weeks ago, health and environmental regulators tested water at 13 homes for two cancer-causing pollutants, which officials discovered last year in dangerous levels at a nearby aquifer under Fort Meade. The March tests at the residences turned up safe levels of the two chemicals - but uncovered high lead levels, which county health officials say are likely attributable to aging plumbing systems.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2005
Anne Arundel County officials will sample well water next week at 19 homes adjacent to Fort Meade after the discovery of cancer-causing pollutants in an aquifer underneath the sprawling Army post. The county learned recently that Army tests done in June at three wells near an aquifer revealed excessive levels of tetrachloroethene, a dry-cleaning solution, and carbon tetrachloride, a pesticide. The chemical levels were as much as four times the federal government's contamination standards.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
Despite buckets of rain that have drenched Maryland in recent weeks, Brenda DeLalla, a resident of south Anne Arundel County, is worried about running out of water. Around her Turkey Point Island neighborhood, residents are digging deeper to tap an aquifer - a large underground source of water - that state officials say is maxed out in some areas. As she runs down the names of friends and neighbors who have paid thousands of dollars to dig deeper wells, DeLalla grouses about a lack of government oversight regarding water resources, something she and other south county residents have tried to rectify without much luck.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
Despite buckets of rain that have drenched Maryland in recent weeks, Brenda DeLalla, a resident of south Anne Arundel County, is worried about running out of water. Around her Turkey Point Island neighborhood, residents are digging deeper to tap an aquifer - a large underground source of water - that state officials say is maxed out in some areas. As she runs down the names of friends and neighbors who have paid thousands of dollars to dig deeper wells, DeLalla grouses about a lack of government oversight regarding water resources, something she and other south county residents have tried to rectify without much luck.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1999
All new major subdivision developments in the Shady Side and Deale area would have to construct a community well and water distribution system rather than drilling into the well-used Aquia aquifer.Any new businesses in Shady Side would have to be on land already zoned commercial. Agricultural land should be rezoned to lower its chances of being developed into residential property.These are just some of the recommendations from the Deale/Shady Side Small Area Planning Committee's land-use and zoning group to guide the area for the next 20 years.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1999
Stephen and Wendy Bozel have discovered a flaw with their new home near Mays Chapel.They can't drink the water."It's too salty," said Wendy Bozel, a fund-raiser for area schools who, with her husband and two children, lives on bottled water.The Bozels say the well serving the house they moved into last month is contaminated by the same substance that experts say pollutes many wells throughout Maryland -- highway salt."It's a common problem, and we're hearing about more of it," said Bruce Gallup, a consultant who has been installing well water pumping systems since 1946.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1995
State officials have turned off the spigot on four wells supplying drinking water to northern Anne Arundel County because the underground water supply is being drained.The county will make up the shortage by pulling more water from its network of 70 wells and increasing its purchases from Baltimore, the Department of Public Works said. The 1.8 million gallons a day from the four wells could supply 3,600 households.While that solution works for the short term, eventually the county will have to spend millions of dollars to pipe water from Crofton-area wells to the Glen Burnie area, where more development is planned.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | January 5, 1992
The U.S. Army has reassured county officials that explosions in a 60-acre pond planned next to the Bush River will not threaten residential ground water supplies near Aberdeen Proving Ground.But a community activist who sits on an APG environmental advisory panel worriesthat any further development in the area could change the quality ofthe Perryman aquifer that serves homes in the U.S. 40 corridor.Helen Richick, a member of the Technical Review Committee that oversees plans to clean up polluted APG "Superfund" sites, said Thursday that she will ask Army, county and state officials for a meeting toexplore whether contamination from the base could affect drinking water.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1998
Thirty-five million years ago, an asteroid blasted a hole in the ocean floor near what is now the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, and thirsty Virginians are still living with the consequences.A federal geologist based in Baltimore says the asteroid's 55-mile-wide crater is to blame for bad-tasting ground water in parts of southeastern Virginia.David S. Powars, of the U.S. Geological Survey, told a Toronto meeting of the Geological Society of America recently that he believes the crater disrupted the layer cake of underground aquifers in the area.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1998
Opponents of the newly opened Hayfields Country Club won a legal victory yesterday when Maryland's second highest court ruled that Baltimore County officials did not adequately consider the environmental impact of the golf course.The long-awaited ruling by the Maryland Court of Special Appeals will have no immediate effect on the country club, as opponents said they do not plan to seek a court order to close the facility now. The ruling, however, opens up the possibility that the county could eventually shut down the golf course even though project opponents yesterday stopped short of saying that was their goal.
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