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NEWS
December 18, 1996
Use of road salt does more harm than goodA Dec. 1 article concerned the continued use of road salt even though it may be environmentally unsafe. Environmentalists say the runoff of road salt into rivers and streams kills fish and aquatic plants. Every year snow covers the terrain and trucks dump an average of 10 million tons of road salt.Sure, the use of road salt is convenient for people who need to get around, but we have to realize that what we are using to rectify this problem is producing a bigger problem.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | September 8, 2007
I need to replace plants I lost to drought this summer. Is there some way to improve survival odds? Drought-proofing? Organic matter in soil acts like a sponge, holding water for plants to use. It also loosens the soil, so rainfall and oxygen can get into the soil and down to roots. Working a composted product into the whole planting bed is better than just adding it to the planting hole. Don't go overboard with the organics, though. Five percent organic matter is considered a good soil.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | September 8, 2007
I need to replace plants I lost to drought this summer. Is there some way to improve survival odds? Drought-proofing? Organic matter in soil acts like a sponge, holding water for plants to use. It also loosens the soil, so rainfall and oxygen can get into the soil and down to roots. Working a composted product into the whole planting bed is better than just adding it to the planting hole. Don't go overboard with the organics, though. Five percent organic matter is considered a good soil.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
An environmental group sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Baltimore yesterday, seeking a ban on the nation's most widely used herbicide -- a weed killer they say is polluting the Chesapeake Bay and other major waterways. The National Resources Defense Council says that up to 70 million pounds of atrazine -- banned in several European countries -- may be causing untold environmental damage by being applied to lawns, golf courses and farms because much of it ends up flowing into the nation's rivers, streams and other bodies of water.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2000
SHALLCROSS CREEK -- It's almost surreal to watch a watercraft built like a cross between a Mississippi side wheeler and a Nebraska corn harvester working its way back and forth across this Eastern Shore creek, ripping out aquatic plants. These aren't the kinds of plants Chesapeake Bay scientists look for as indicators of the estuary's health. They are water chestnuts, an invasive species that forms thick rafts of leaves on bay tributaries, making it difficult to maneuver a canoe and all but impossible to get a powerboat through.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
An environmental group sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Baltimore yesterday, seeking a ban on the nation's most widely used herbicide -- a weed killer they say is polluting the Chesapeake Bay and other major waterways. The National Resources Defense Council says that up to 70 million pounds of atrazine -- banned in several European countries -- may be causing untold environmental damage by being applied to lawns, golf courses and farms because much of it ends up flowing into the nation's rivers, streams and other bodies of water.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Tips provided by Valley View FarmsSUN STAFF | July 14, 1996
Backyard ponds have gone mainstream -- in a big way.Trickling waterfalls, lush waterlilies and exotic fish can be found tucked into a variety of outdoor spaces these days -- from tiny townhouse lots to sprawling suburban acreage.Some homeowners choose to do the work themselves. Others rely on professional landscape architects. Either way, the result is a scenic water garden that brings landlocked residents closer nature."It's taken off by leaps and bounds," says Tim McQuaid, aquatics manager of Valley View Farms in Cockeysville.
NEWS
May 2, 2001
What's for dinner? Yellowbill ducks eat aquatic plants, insects, snails, grain and seeds. Dabbling Ducks ... African yellowbill ducks are the only African ducks with a bright yellow color on the bill. They are widespread across southern and eastern Africa and usually live in large flocks that break into smaller groups when the rainy season begins. Do you know? What does "dabbling duck" mean? Answer: This refers to birds that do not dive for their food but skim the surface of the water to catch their meals.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 7, 2012
Algae isn't always the nuisance it's been in the Chesapeake Bay lately.  Some Baltimore city students learned Wednesday that at least some strains of the microscopic aquatic plants hold promise for beneficial uses, as sources of sustainable fish food or renewable energy. Green Street Academy , a two-year-old public middle-high school in West Baltimore with a focus on the green movement and associated careers, explored algae's energy potential during its "Energy Exchange," a three-day end-of-year expo for students, their families and others in the community.
NEWS
May 12, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer visited South Carroll High School last week -- his second appearance there this academic year.The governor visited South Carroll in October to kick off a pilot recycling program for selected high schools across the state. Both South Carroll and Westminster high schools were chosen as sites for the program.After a school-wide assembly and a discussion with members of theschool's environment club, the governor cut his appearance short, but promised to return at a later date.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2000
SHALLCROSS CREEK -- It's almost surreal to watch a watercraft built like a cross between a Mississippi side wheeler and a Nebraska corn harvester working its way back and forth across this Eastern Shore creek, ripping out aquatic plants. These aren't the kinds of plants Chesapeake Bay scientists look for as indicators of the estuary's health. They are water chestnuts, an invasive species that forms thick rafts of leaves on bay tributaries, making it difficult to maneuver a canoe and all but impossible to get a powerboat through.
NEWS
December 18, 1996
Use of road salt does more harm than goodA Dec. 1 article concerned the continued use of road salt even though it may be environmentally unsafe. Environmentalists say the runoff of road salt into rivers and streams kills fish and aquatic plants. Every year snow covers the terrain and trucks dump an average of 10 million tons of road salt.Sure, the use of road salt is convenient for people who need to get around, but we have to realize that what we are using to rectify this problem is producing a bigger problem.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Tips provided by Valley View FarmsSUN STAFF | July 14, 1996
Backyard ponds have gone mainstream -- in a big way.Trickling waterfalls, lush waterlilies and exotic fish can be found tucked into a variety of outdoor spaces these days -- from tiny townhouse lots to sprawling suburban acreage.Some homeowners choose to do the work themselves. Others rely on professional landscape architects. Either way, the result is a scenic water garden that brings landlocked residents closer nature."It's taken off by leaps and bounds," says Tim McQuaid, aquatics manager of Valley View Farms in Cockeysville.
NEWS
June 15, 2005
About 150 pupils from South Shore and Edgewater elementary schools waded waist-deep into the waters of the Severn River on Monday morning to plant redhead grass along the riverbed. The mass planting was the culmination of a series of projects the pupils have worked on all year through the Chesapeake Connections program. Sponsored by the state Department of Natural Resources, the program is designed to educate pupils and get them involved in keeping the Chesapeake Bay healthy. The pupils grew the grass, one of the few aquatic plants recovering from the pollution and nutrient overload in the river, said Stephen Barry, coordinator of outdoor education for the school system.
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