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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
The National Aquarium's eight dolphins are no longer a show unto themselves. After two decades of dramatic leaps and crowd-pleasing stunts, aquarium officials are eliminating the 20-minute dolphin shows in favor of a more open-ended exhibit. Beginning Friday, aquarium visitors will be able to visit the dolphin amphitheater throughout the day and interact with trainers. Instead of charging a separate admission price for the dolphin show, the aquarium is raising general admission ticket prices.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
The National Aquarium in Baltimore 's Inner Harbor is redesigning its dolphin show — and its admission prices. Beginning May 4, the "timed, limited-access and separately priced [dolphin] shows" will be eliminated and replaced by all-day access to the dolphins and their trainers, according to a statement released Thursday by the aquarium. Along with the new dolphin show format, the aquarium is increasing its base admission price to $29.95 for adults and $20.95 for children.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
A woman being sought by police for questioning in the deaths of 40 animals found at a Columbia townhouse Monday was a former employee of the National Aquarium in Baltimore . A letter addressed from Howard County police to Beth Lindenau was left at the residence where police removed the dead animals, including some inside of a freezer. Police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn would not confirm the woman's name but said it is police policy to leave addressed letters at homes to inform residents if animals have been impounded.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2011
Events for 2012 are starting to pop up in the inbox. This one got our attention. The National Aquarium's ongoing series of Fresh Thoughts dinners resumes on Jan. 24 with Chad Wells, who will be presenting a menu of invasive species from Maryland waters, including crab, blue catfish and snakehead. Wells has honchoed a few of these invasive-species dinners already -- at his own Alewife , at the Creative Alliance and at an all-star October benefit for the Oyster Recovery Partnership at Rockfish in Annapolis Tickets for the Fresh Thoughts dinner with Chad Wells at the National Aquarium are $89. The evening begins with a cocktail reception and cooking demonstration, followed by a four-course dinner featuring a Maryland blue crab appetizer , a "Frankenfish Taco," and a deconstructed paella with smoked Chesapeake gold oyster and seared blue catfish.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
Sea-inspired melodies are helping efforts to give terminally ill children, disabled veterans and other special-needs groups glimpses of aquatic life at the National Aquarium in Baltimore . Musician Greg Pierce is donating $5 from every sale of "Sea Notes," his CD with eight instrumental compositions, one of which is the background for the aquarium's popular "Jellies Invasion: Oceans Out of Balance" exhibit. Photographer David Simpson, whose cover shot for the album has been reproduced on a poster, is also donating $5 from every poster sold to a program that helps the aquarium honor requests for a no-charge look at its exhibits.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Scientists from the National Aquarium and the Johns Hopkins University say they've found low but potentially harmful levels of toxic oil contaminants in the Gulf of Mexico months after the Deepwater Horizon well blowout was capped. Erik Rifkin, interim executive director of the aquarium's conservation center, and Yongseok Hong, a post-doctoral fellow at Hopkins, say that using devices that mimic the way fish absorb contaminants in their environment, they've detected oil-related chemical compounds on the Louisiana coast that traditional water sampling methods mostly missed.
BUSINESS
Liz F. Kay | September 30, 2011
If you haven't booked all your nights and weekends scheduling events for Free Fall Baltimore , remember you can enjoy a cheaper visit to the National Aquarium in Baltimore every Friday evening after 5 p.m. Visitors will pay only $8 *** to visit the aquarium if they buy tickets from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday nights through March 23. The aquarium also stays open until 9:30 p.m., so this is remains a great option if you want to walk off...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2011
The National Aquarium has revamped its main dining facility, and the new space has a fresh and local focus that is "in perfect harmony with the Aquarium's green business practices and conservation education mission. " Operated by the Gaithersburg, Md-based Sodexo Leisure, the aquarium 's new cafe will feature seasonal produce, artisanal cheeses, grass-fed beef, humanely raised chicken, sustainably-harvested seafood and shade-grown coffee. A press release announcing the new facility says that the new dining facility will act as "an extension of a visit to the National Aquarium.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
  On Vixen! On Prancer! On .... Oceana? They're probably not heading to the north pole, but the three sea turtles the National Aquarium released into the wild on Friday might just be heading in that general direction. The aquarium and Oceana, an ocean protection organization, released three endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtles into the Chesapeake Bay at Point Lookout State Park last week. The turtles had been recuperating at the aquqarium since last winter, when they were founded stranded in Cape Cod. Kemp's ridley's are the most endangered and smallest of all sea turtle species, Aquarium officials say. The wintertime Massachusett's water temperature was especially dangerous for the sensitive turtles.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
Tiger sharks glided swift and smooth, moray eels darted into submerged caves and, in a full-blown rain forest re-created indoors, leafy and humid, tropical birds flitted past tamarin monkeys. John Racanelli, on his first visit to Baltimore's National Aquarium, was nothing short of astounded. Aquariums, he had thought, were dark, dank and strange. This ecological theater was anything but. Racanelli wasn't just a suit on a business trip. Like many representing other cities that hoped an aquarium might do for their town what this one did for Baltimore, he considered himself a pilgrim.
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