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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
She had won a string of beauty pageants - and was the original St. Pauli Girl of beer advertising fame - so Debbie Walker, a blond model from Washington, D.C., was accustomed to her fair share of attention. But she'd never seen anything like the morning of July 15, 1981. She had to wear a skin-tight, sequined costume with a 15-foot train for that gig. A team of frogmen carried her across a makeshift pond and placed her on a rock. And as cameras from media outlets around the world clicked, flashed and rolled, three seals swam over to pay her a visit, followed by an equally frisky mayor of Baltimore, William Donald Schaefer.
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BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2012
Attendance at the National Aquarium this year is expected to tick up a little more than 1 percent to 1.33 million, but remains significantly below levels experienced several years ago before the recession. Still, an economic impact report to be released Wednesday found that many of the visitors to the Inner Harbor attraction come from out of state, spend a good deal of money in the region and cite the aquarium as the reason they came. The study, conducted by Sage Policy Group, estimates that the aquarium is responsible for an economic impact of nearly $320 million in the Baltimore and Washington region, providing an underpinning for more than 3,300 jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
Marylanders can knock up to $8 off the cost of a morning visit to Baltimore's National Aquarium, under a program announced Monday. The "Maryland Mornings" promotion discounts adult admission by $8 and child admission by $4 for visits that start before noon Sunday through Friday. "Maryland Mornings is one of the ways for us to show our appreciation to our fellow community members," Aquarium CEO John Racanelli said in a news release. "National Aquarium may have a reach that spans across the country and world, but our roots are in Maryland and many of our conservation and education efforts are based here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
The National Aquarium resumes its Fresh Thoughts series on Sept. 25 with Chris Becker, executive chef, and Omar Semidey, chef de cuisine, of the soon-to-be opened Fleet Street Kitchen. Fresh Thoughts: A Sustainable Seafood Series features educational cooking demonstrations by well-known local chefs, followed by seated dinners. Previous guest chefs have included Bryan Voltaggio (Volt), Jason Ambrose (Salt), Thomas Dunklin (B&O American Brasserie), and Chad Wells (Alewife). The evening will conclude with a stroll through the Aquarium.
BUSINESS
Sun Staff | August 20, 2012
The National Aquarium announced Monday that it would issue a special Grand Prix-week ticket that will allow guests to visit the venue as many times as they like for seven consecutive days. The seven-day ticket can be purchased online at aqua.org or at the National Aquarium in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. All tickets issued for Aug. 27 through Sept. 3 will be good for seven full days, the aquarium said in a news release. Also, Grand Prix ticketholders can bypass the aquarium's general admission line by presenting their entry pass to the race, the aquarium announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
A planned $12.5 million coral reef exhibit will be the first step toward a rejuvenated National Aquarium, officials said this week. The Wings in the Water exhibit, the centerpiece of the Pier 3 Pavilion and a home for rays, sharks and other large fish, will be turned into what officials are calling Blacktip Reef. The replica of an Indo-Pacific Coral Reef - thinkAustralia'sGreat Barrier Reef, though much smaller - it will be home to a school of more than a dozen sharks, plus other creatures that call such habitats home.
NEWS
By Nick Cafferky, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
The National Aquarium's Marine Animal Rescue Program staff is inviting the public to go to the beach with them and look for dolphins. On Friday, July 20, from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m., the National Aquarium will conduct its annual effort to collect information on the number of Atlantic bottlenose dolphins. This species - which can also be found in the Baltimore aquarium - uses Maryland waters for migration, feeding and summertime breeding. The event, which has been held since 1997, encourages volunteers to collect data that helps provide a picture of the animals' populations and reproductive rates.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser | June 19, 2012
You'd think that almost being bitten by a 9-foot-long python would turn Kyle Mays running for the door. But for some reason, the Woodberry resident has continued working at Baltimore's National Aquarium for five years. "I have always wanted to work with animals and teach. I get to do both at the aquarium," said, Mays, 29, one of two herpetologists at the exhibit "Animal Planet Australia: Wild Extremes. " Some of his day-to-day responsibilities include taking care of the reptiles and amphibians such as Australian freshwater crocodiles, flying foxes, which are a type of fruit bat, and freshwater whip rays.
FEATURES
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
You've heard of once in a blue moon, but what about once in a blue lobster? The crew of The Potluck fishing boat came up with a sparkling catch last week off the shores of Ocean City: a rare blue lobster. Capt. John Gourley brought in the blue lobster with his normal catch to Martin Fish Co. in West Ocean City, where he typically sells his lobsters in the retail market. But a different fate awaits Toby, as the cerulean crustacean is now known. Weighing a little more than a pound, the lobster is destined for the National Aquarium in Washington, according to Ginger Nappi, the assistant manager of Martin Fish Co., where the lobster is currently residing in a tank until aquarium officials arrive.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 8, 2012
Happy World Oceans Day - sort of.  Today marks the annual observance of the vast water bodies that cover nearly three-quarters of Earth's surface.  It's a time for taking stock. Oceans regulate our climate (El Nino and La Nina, anyone?) and feed us, among other things. But 90 percent of the big predator fish that once roamed the seas are gone, according to biologists, and 20 percent of the coral reefs are similarly depleted.  Yet less than 2 percent of the oceans are formally protected.
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