Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAquarium
IN THE NEWS

Aquarium

ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2001
Has it really been 20 years since opening day at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, and the line to the ticket office stretched four blocks to Light Street? More than 8,000 visitors toured the newest attraction to the Inner Harbor that day, admiring about 5,000 animals. Since Aug. 8, 1981, the aquatic collection has nearly tripled in size and scope, and more than 29 million visitors from all over the world have walked through the aquarium's doors. What a difference two decades make. On Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2001, the aquarium will celebrate 20 years of community support and success with an elaborate birthday bash -- and you're invited.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 25, 1994
Can you tell when fish are relaxing? Faith, Hope and Charity seem to be swimming a little more lazily these days, finning around and around a 12-foot-diameter fiberglass tank in a converted warehouse in Fells Point.No tourists gawking. No kids knocking on the glass. No cameras flashing in their faces. Nobody around but a few handlers to feed them and keep the salinity of their tanks at proper levels.The big grouper fish, you see, are on vacation -- their first since their debut as original residents of the Open Ocean Exhibit when the National Aquarium in Baltimore opened its doors in 1981.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | June 25, 1993
Officer Bill Goodman has been patrolling the Essex area on a bicycle for over a year, in all weather. When he can, he stops and talks with children and sometimes plays a quick game of catch.During one such game a few months ago, the Baltimore County police officer noticed several children from the Village of Tall Trees apartment complex talking about their bad grades. They didn't seem upset. Officer Goodman decided to issue a challenge: If they brought their grades up, he'd take all of them to the National Aquarium in Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
You usually waste no time running away from them. No one ever considers running to them.Jellyfish, those stinging creatures that are avoided at all costs, now will have their own exhibit at the National Aquarium in Baltimore. Staffers are hoping the public will run to see them."Jellies: Phantoms of the Deep" opens Saturday with a ribbon-cutting ceremony by Frances Hughes Glendening, wife of the governor, and it will remain at the aquarium for two years."Jellyfish are just amazing animals," says Mark Donovan, senior director of exhibits and design.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin | January 25, 1992
The National Aquarium has decided to remove its two surviving beluga whales -- in part because of the apparent killing of a beluga by a dolphin last month during a training exercise in the Marine Mammal Pavilion.Aquarium Director Nicholas Brown said last night that the decision to give up the beluga and concentrate on dolphins was made Thursday and announced to his staff in a written memo but was not made public before word had leaked out. It was reported last night by WBAL-TV."I don't have any idea when they're going or where they're going," Mr. Brown said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | November 21, 1990
Of all the things they've discovered about their new home at the National Aquarium's Marine Mammal Pavilion, Akai, Nalu and Nani seem to like the 55-foot-long window wall the best.Walk up to the 8-foot-high acrylic window and the three bottlenose dolphins will soon delight you by swimming up and peering back at you.But, look out. It's a setup."They'll wait and, at just the right moment, a wall of water comes over the side," said Doug Messinger, the assistant curator of dolphins.Several reporters invited yesterday to preview the exhibit before its Dec. 26 opening fell for the gag. They were rewarded with a saltwater baptism squirted over the wall by the marine comedians.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | August 12, 1992
Twenty-one J22 sailboats raced an Olympic course off Fort McHenry last weekend in the second annual Aquarium Cup Regatta, sponsored by the National Aquarium and the Downtown Sailing Club. Jef Eyring, president of Downtown Sailing, did a great job coordinating all the details involved in the two-day event.Among the sailors were state Sen. John Pica, who finished like a good politician -- somewhere in the middle; investment broker Greg Barnhill, chairman of the upcoming Columbus Cup races; and the winners, Marian Bruno of Washington and Dr. Mary Carroll of Baltimore.
NEWS
By knight-ridder news service | March 26, 1997
CAMDEN, N.J. - When it opened five years ago, the New Jersey State Aquarium was a "pioneer" on the Camden waterfront - a successful one at first. Nearly 600,000 visitors passed through its doors in the first four months of operation. During the next 12 months, 832,000 attended.Then, attendance sank.The new aquarium's exhibits weren't as colorful as those at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, and the waterfront was missing attractions to lure visitors outside of the region. Only 447,000 came to the Camden facility in fiscal 1995.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1996
It didn't take long yesterday for some monkey business to start in the fish tank.The National Aquarium in Baltimore added two roughtail rays to its "Wings in the Water" exhibit yesterday -- a male ray caught off the coast of Delaware and a female that was rescued from an intake canal of a nuclear power plant north of Palm Beach, Fla.Those rays joined a male roughtail -- the name comes from its spiny posterior -- and it didn't take him long to roll out...
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2002
Humans, young and old, are not the only species that get bored with their toys. So do animals - and veterinary experts say that is unhealthy. This week, about 25 staffers at the National Aquarium took up power drills, handsaws, PVC pipes and an assortment of hardware to build new toys. Staffers strung together a rope ladder for South American monkeys, chained together Hula-Hoops for bottlenose dolphins and hacked PVC pipes into shapes that will challenge the eight arms of the giant Pacific octopus.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.