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Aquarium In Baltimore

NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | August 12, 1993
When the environmental artist known as Wyland came to Baltimore this week to paint a "whaling wall" -- a large mural of a life-sized whale -- his mission was to raise public awareness about whales and the need to save the oceans.In the process, though, he's stirring up a whale of a controversy about public art in Baltimore -- and where it does and doesn't belong.The site of Wyland's Baltimore mural -- the 11th of 17 he's painting along the East Coast this summer -- is the Lee Electric Co. building at Hamburg and Russell streets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julia Furlong | November 13, 2003
A hungry estate Think your annual preparation of a Thanksgiving feast is a nerve-racking affair? Just think how daunting it would be to create a meal for an entire estate, every night. "From Field to Fork: The Mansion and Farm Worked Together" is being offered at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Hampton National Historic Site in Towson. The program will explore what it took to prepare a meal in the 18th and 19th centuries. Learn how the many people on the vast estate were provided for. This free, one-hour culinary investigation will include viewing the many outbuildings that were necessary components of meal preparation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MATT VENSEL | August 16, 2007
FAMILY CONCERT FOR CONSERVATION Enjoy a night of music and family entertainment while assisting the conservation efforts of the National Aquarium in Baltimore at Disneymania -- Concerts for Conservation on Saturday. Actress Olesya Rulin, of High School Musical and High School Musical 2, hosts the benefit concert, while Disney Records' young hip-hop / pop group T-Squad provides the music. The aquarium is also announcing the first winner of its Muddy Feet Award, an award given to young conservationists.
NEWS
June 18, 2002
Charles S. "Tod" Connor, a former Bethlehem Steel Corp. manager and longtime volunteer at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, died of a brain aneurysm Thursday at Sinai Hospital. The Randallstown resident was 71. Born and raised in Scarsdale, N.Y., Mr. Connor earned a bachelor's degree in agricultural engineering from Cornell University in 1953. After serving in the Army from 1953 to 1955, he moved to Baltimore and went to work for International Harvester Corp. In the late 1950s, he joined the industrial engineering department at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant, and later became superintendent of its production scheduling department.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2003
Sleeping with the fishes was never supposed to be this much fun. The National Aquarium in Baltimore is presenting a new overnight program in which visitors can take part in a "Sleepover With the Sharks," now through August. The adventure includes guided tours, behind-the-scenes access and hands-on activities. The event is geared to adults and children ages 8 and older. The event includes a guided tour throughout the aquarium, including a tour to the food-preparation area to see how the sharks and the rays are fed and cared for. Guests can take a walk along the Shark Catwalk and view the swimming sharks that are just inches below their feet.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | May 3, 1992
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. -- In search of a Baltimore-style rejuvenation, this conservation-oriented city on the Tennessee River has joined the growing ranks of American cities that have opened aquariums.A mile-long parade of 700 children dressed as schools of fish launched a three-day "Festival of Rivers" that Chattanooga is throwing this weekend to celebrate the opening of the $45 million Tennessee Aquarium, which Mayor Gene Roberts calls "our very own, home-grown cathedral of conservation.""The aquarium will establish us as men and women who celebrate clean water and clean air as the lifeblood which sustains us all," he said in opening ceremonies Friday.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | May 6, 1994
OCEAN CITY -- A baby harbor porpoise that washed ashore early yesterday was rescued by residents and flown by Coast Guard helicopter to the National Aquarium in Baltimore, where it was in critical condition last night.The injured porpoise, which is estimated to be between 3 months and 5 months old, was found stranded on the beach by a sanitation worker, and several nearby residents came to its aid."I looked out my front window and saw it laying there, flopping around," said John Rehak who, with a friend, Stacy London, stayed with the porpoise while police were summoned.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1994
Gov. William Donald Schaefer waded last night in the dolphin pool at the National Aquarium, 13 years after his famous 1981 dip in the facility's seal pool.The occasion was a party for Frank A. Gunther Jr., who stepped down May 1 as chairman of the aquarium after two lengthy stints. Mr. Gunther swam in the seal pool with Mr. Schaefer -- then mayor of Baltimore -- in the summer of 1981 to make amends for its opening a month later than scheduled.Mr. Schaefer made his splash this time in the dolphin tank at the Marine Mammal Pavilion on Pier 4. Wearing a black baseball cap, blue aquarium staff shirt and hip-high galoshes, he stood in the shallow end of the pool and signaled to one of the dolphins, which surprised him by leaping out of the water.
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