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Aquarium In Baltimore

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By Karin Remesch | July 19, 1998
Mission: To stimulate interest, develop knowledge and inspire stewardship of aquatic environments by providing cultural, recreational and educational experiences through exhibits and programs. The aquarium's diverse collection of more than 10,000 animals, representing more than 600 species of fish, birds, amphibians, reptiles and marine mammals, lives in re-created habitats.Latest accomplishment: Since March, the aquarium's temporary exhibit space has been taken over by 40 species of terrestrial and aquatic venomous animals,including the death adder, gaboon viper, velvet ants and gila monster.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Toby is one lucky lobster.   He was born with a blue-hued shell, a 1-in-2 million variation that arises as the result of an excess of a certain protein, according to the University of Maine Lobster Institute. The crew of the Pot Luck fishing boat plucked Toby from the waters near Ocean City in June 2012.  After a few nerve-racking days chilling in the lobster tank at Martin Fish Co. in West Ocean City, Toby was put on display at the National Aquarium in Washington, D.C.  But then the Washington location of the Aquarium closed in September 2013 and Toby and 1,700 other animals from the collection needed to be moved to the Aquarium's Baltimore venue.  Today, at an age when most of his peers have been dunked in drawn butter or mixed with a little mayonnaise on a bun, Toby arrived in his fourth home.  Toby will now spend his days wiggling his antennae in the Atlantic Shelf gallery in the "Maryland: Mountains to the Sea" exhibit at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 9, 2009
Its stars may be as frolicsome and endearing as ever, but designers of the new dolphin show at the National Aquarium in Baltimore say the idea is to do more than simply show the aquatic charmers at play. "In the old show, Play, we tried to show play as a form of learning," says Nancy Hotchkiss, the aquarium's senior director for visitor experiences. "We wanted people to see that with the dolphins, and realize that for themselves." The new show, titled Our Ocean Planet, tries for something a little more serious, she says.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | March 12, 2010
There's a new dolphin calf at the National Aquarium in Baltimore. An Atlantic bottlenose dolphin named Jade gave birth to the calf Wednesday night. The newborn dolphin was about 30 pounds and 2 to 3 feet long at birth. Aquarium staff haven't been able to determine the sex of the calf yet. But they say the calf appears to be healthy. It has started to nurse and has been swimming alongside Jade and another female dolphin. The aquarium notes that even with a successful birth and an experienced mother, about one-third of dolphin calves don't survive their first year of life -- either in the wild or in captivity.
NEWS
By Ilene Hollin and Ilene Hollin,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2004
The beauty of the underwater world, from the vibrant color of fish to their swift glide through the water, can now be experienced without seeing a thing. The first large group of visually impaired children took an audio tour of the National Aquarium in Baltimore yesterday designed specifically for them - an effort to open the popular tourist attraction to those without sight. "Through accessible programs like this, it really opens up museums to other people," said Dale Otto, president of Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind and a blind man who after nine years in Baltimore had never visited the aquarium.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1997
Dr. Stewart Bauman, an 84-year-old Columbia resident who has a degenerative disease, was leaving the National Aquarium in Baltimore in his wheelchair after silently watching the jellyfish and electric eels.Staffer member Audrey Suhr offered a warm goodbye. The occasion was Aquarium Cares, a free program inviting mentally and physically challenged visitors twice a year to have the entire place to themselves and family.In response, Bauman, looked at her and spoke words that were magic to his daughter, Nechie King, who had accompanied him:"I had a lovely time."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 4, 1996
LEWES, Del. -- It had been a dogfish day afternoon for a team of researchers from the National Aquarium in Baltimore.On the fourth day of a weeklong Delaware Bay expedition hunting for sharks and other exotic sea creatures, four marine biologists kept pulling up the apparently uninteresting and toothless dogfish shark -- 15 of them to that point. They frowned and tossed all of them back.The aquarium staff comes to the Delaware Bay each year in search of sandbar sharks to add to its collection and to release sandbar sharks that have become too big and too aggressive to keep in the tank with smaller fish.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and By Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2001
Its pyramid-shaped rooftops help define the city skyline and are as much a symbol of the new Baltimore as white marble steps, hard-shelled crabs and decrepit docks were of the old. As the countdown continues to its 20th anniversary Wednesday, the National Aquarium in Baltimore welcomed the 30 millionth visitor yesterday to its submerged world of kaleidoscopic colors and seldom-seen species. That milestone, marked by considerable fanfare, equates to nearly six times the state's population -- not bad for a building that was derided as a mere "fish tank" when it was proposed but quickly became a cornerstone of the city's Inner Harbor revival.
TRAVEL
By Philip Hersh and Philip Hersh,Chicago Tribune | August 17, 2008
I was kneeling under 12 feet of water when the sensation began, the feeling of something soft and velvety on the back of my neck. A minute passed, then another, and it was still there, a feathery pressure. There were nine sharks, including two very playful zebra sharks, swimming near me, but I wasn't worried about the tickle coming from one of them. They all kept a respectable - if not respectful - distance, even if that was barely a foot away at times. After all, I had told dive master Yves Delpech I would not be intimidated by having the creatures on top of me, in a manner of speaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | August 12, 2001
Architect Peter Chermayeff was 38 when he got a phone call about the possibility of designing an aquarium for Baltimore's waterfront. Housing commissioner Robert C. Embry Jr. had visited Boston's popular New England Aquarium, which opened in 1969, and envisioned building a similar attraction for Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Aware that Chermayeff led the design effort for New England, Embry wanted to hire him for Baltimore as well. It was an enormous responsibility for such a relatively young architect, but Embry didn't consider it a gamble.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
Exhibit on Baltimore NAACP opens today at central Pratt A new exhibition sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library and the Baltimore branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People opens today at the Central Library, 400 Cathedral St. Titled "97 Years and Counting," the exhibition contains memorabilia from the nearly century-old Baltimore branch of the NAACP. On display are historic photographs, posters and documents from the NAACP's start in 1912 through the civil rights movement and the organization's work today.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Hanah.cho@baltsun.com | June 25, 2009
National Aquarium in Baltimore, whose bond rating was downgraded by a major Wall Street firm this week, said Wednesday that the nonprofit has been taking steps to improve its financial condition during tough economic times. Moody's Investors Service cut the aquarium's rating from "A3" to "Baa1," which is still an investment-grade category but a move that makes it more expensive to borrow money. Moody's cited concerns about the aquarium's diminishing financial resources due to recent investment losses, using funds from the group's foundation arm to finance capital projects and pressure on attendance as well as exposure to debt with a variable rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 9, 2009
Its stars may be as frolicsome and endearing as ever, but designers of the new dolphin show at the National Aquarium in Baltimore say the idea is to do more than simply show the aquatic charmers at play. "In the old show, Play, we tried to show play as a form of learning," says Nancy Hotchkiss, the aquarium's senior director for visitor experiences. "We wanted people to see that with the dolphins, and realize that for themselves." The new show, titled Our Ocean Planet, tries for something a little more serious, she says.
NEWS
November 23, 2008
Woman stabbed to death at Baltimore County store 1 A 23-year-old woman was fatally stabbed yesterday afternoon in a liquor store in western Baltimore County near the city line, Baltimore County police said. The woman was in the Charing Cross Liquors store in the 5200 block of Baltimore National Pike around 4 p.m. when she was stabbed in the neck, Cpl. Ben Yohe said. The woman, whose name was not released, was taken to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center where she was pronounced dead, Yohe said.
TRAVEL
By MICHELLE DEAL and MICHELLE DEAL,michelle.deal@baltsun.com | October 19, 2008
The "staycation" trend has been around since last summer and with the recent economic turmoil, it's probably here to stay. Even if the market rebounds quickly, there's still baggage fees, fewer flights and general travel weariness dragging down tourism. There are a couple of bright spots in the recent patch of dreary financial news. One is the rising strength of the dollar against some foreign currencies, which could help you save a few bucks on a hotel in London or Quebec. Another is falling gas prices that make the quick weekend getaway a bit more tempting.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | September 25, 2008
What was that thing in the water? A dolphin? A shark? Gail Hill was calmly feeding the ducks off her pier in Essex's Norman Creek on Tuesday evening when she spotted what was unmistakably a large form moving just under the surface. Wait, make that two. It was only when one of the beasts popped its whiskered snout out of the water that Hill realized the visitors were manatees - a not-too-common animal in the Chesapeake Bay and its estuaries. Normally, they're sunning themselves in balmy Florida.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2005
This is a scene from an Eisner Communications television ad for the National Aquarium in Baltimore's Australia exhibit, which is scheduled to open Dec. 16.
NEWS
October 28, 2006
On October 24, 2006, ROBERT S. CHRISTY; beloved husband of Jean (nee Ensign); loving father of Cynthia (Ralph), of Rochester, NY and Craig, of Irvine, CA; grandfather of Eric, Alison, Ian, Keanan and Zachary. Services private. Contributions may be made to the National Aquarium in Baltimore, 501 E. Pratt St., Baltimore, MD 21202
TRAVEL
By Philip Hersh and Philip Hersh,Chicago Tribune | August 17, 2008
I was kneeling under 12 feet of water when the sensation began, the feeling of something soft and velvety on the back of my neck. A minute passed, then another, and it was still there, a feathery pressure. There were nine sharks, including two very playful zebra sharks, swimming near me, but I wasn't worried about the tickle coming from one of them. They all kept a respectable - if not respectful - distance, even if that was barely a foot away at times. After all, I had told dive master Yves Delpech I would not be intimidated by having the creatures on top of me, in a manner of speaking.
NEWS
By Euna Lhee and Euna Lhee,Sun reporter | August 1, 2008
A female dolphin calf that was born Sunday at the National Aquarium in Baltimore appears to be in "robust health," but her survival for the critical first year will depend on her mother, aquarium officials said yesterday. Chesapeake, a 16-year-old Atlantic bottlenose dolphin, gave birth at 7:13 a.m. to a 30-pound, 2- to 3-foot-long calf - her third since 1992. The mother will not appear in any shows for at least another year, a spokeswoman said. The birth comes about two weeks after the loss of a dolphin male calf, which was stillborn July 14. Aquarium officials are awaiting the results of a necropsy at the Johns Hopkins University's comparative pathology lab. "Since we put so much time and care into these animals, we're very excited with this calf's arrival," aquarium spokeswoman Jen Bloomer said.
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