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NEWS
December 28, 1990
Watching a dolphin do flips in the air and walk on its tail is the stuff of wide-eyed childhood wonderment, but it evokes a few ooohs and aahs from adults, too. So the new Marine Mammal Pavilion, which opened its doors this week, will make a big splash indeed in Baltimore.The $35 million pavilion is an impressive addition to the National Aquarium. It boasts Beluga whales and Atlantic bottlenose dolphins, a 110-foot-wide pool where dolphins perform, exhibitions, artwork, interactive games, a discovery room with marine animal artifacts, classrooms and a 40-foot replica of a humpback whale.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
A new exhibit will open next spring at the National Aquarium featuring horseshoe crabs and moon jellies among waves, beaches and dunes, the Inner Harbor attraction announced Monday. The $5.5 million "Living Seashore" exhibit, which will span 2,700 square feet, is designed to teach visitors about the "ever-changing Mid-Atlantic seashore. " More than 150 animals will live in the display that will include two large touch pools filled with 5,331 gallons of salt water and a replicated sandy shore.
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NEWS
April 10, 1992
The bottlenose dolphin calf born March 26 appears to be gaining weight again after returning to a more normal nursing pattern, mammalogists at the National Aquarium in Baltimore said today.Last week, officials were concerned because the calf was losing weight and didn't appear to be getting the nourishment it needed."We're still concerned about the calf," said Nedra Hecker, senior mammalogist. "But we're feeling better about it."She said the staff had stopped its 24-hour watch of the calf and now keeps an 8 a.m.-to-6 p.m. watch.
TRAVEL
The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
The annual dolphin count takes place today in Ocean City from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Volunteers can join staff from the National Aquarium's Animal Rescue team at Assateague State Park Day Use Area (6915 Stephen Decatur Highway, Berlin); or at the beach on 40th Street, 81st Street or 130th Street. Last year, participants reported 113 sightings of Atlantic bottle nose dolphins off the coast of Ocean City. That number was a significantly higher than the 31 dolphins seen in 2012. There were 107 sightings in 2011, an amount that is considered relatively normal.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
An 18-month effort to repair damaged tanks at the National Aquarium in Baltimore came to a successful conclusion yesterday as hundreds of schoolchildren, acting like schools of fish, became the first visitors to tour the refurbished Atlantic Coral Reef tank.Board Chairman James A. Flick Jr. announced that the aquarium is just a few thousand dollars shy of reaching its goal of raising $24 million needed to pay for the repairs and build future exhibits.The construction work is "a testimony to our resolve to remain a leader -- a world-class aquarium, exciting and vital, entertaining and educational," he told more than 300 people gathered for the opening ceremonies on Pier 3."
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | March 12, 1991
LETTERS, or you never know who, or what, is out there:Our Glimpses about Baltimore's first aquarium, which opened in Druid Hill Park June 1, 1938, and closed five years later, prompted a letter from Haven Kolb:"As a young member of the Natural History Society of Maryland, I was acquainted with a number of persons active in establishing that aquarium, among them Fred Saffran, whom you quote." Kolb sent along a program from that opening day 53 years ago. Of particular note in the text: "You may join the aquarium by the payment of a dollar."
NEWS
By Susan Schoenberger and Lynda Robinson | October 24, 1990
Three more Atlantic bottlenose dolphins were moved late last night into Baltimore's National Aquarium, joining three others that will be displayed in the new $35 million marine mammal pavilion when it opens in December.The three female dolphins -- Hailey, Schooner and Shiloh -- were purchased from Zoovet, a California-based company that supplies dolphins to aquariums, said Vicki Aversa, an aquarium spokeswoman. The dolphins had been living at the Hawk's Cay marine mammal facility in the Florida Keys.
NEWS
By Sue Nevy | August 7, 1991
ALL APPEARED to be in order on first glance around the quarantine room behind the seal pool at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.Harbor seal 91-05 rested comfortably in his pool. Thin and debilitated when rescued several weeks ago on a Virginia beach, the nearly full-grown seal stirred at my presence, a signal that his breakfast of herring and smelt was probably on its way. His huge dark eyes followed my every movement, reminding me that I wasn't alone SueNevyin being awake and on the job at 7:30 on a Saturday morning.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | March 4, 1995
A year-old harp seal, found stranded on Assateague Island at least 500 miles south of its natural habitat, was in critical condition yesterday at the National Aquarium.T. David Schofield, a senior mammalogist at the aquarium, said the seal was found Monday, weighing 76 pounds -- about 35 pounds below normal -- and was dehydrated and possibly stricken with parasites. Its condition has improved only slightly since it was found, he said."We're watching this animal closely," Mr. Schofield said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1990
A security guard at the National Aquarium passed out early today when he walked into a room where machinery that produces ozone for a water purification system had blown a pressure relief valve.The guard, Sylvester McIntosh, 38, of the 3500 block of Edmondson Ave., was taken to Mercy Medical Center, where he was reported in stable condition, undergoing evaluation.Capt. Patrick P. Flynn, a spokesman for the city Fire Department, said a hazardous materials team was called to the aquarium's new Marine Mammal Pavilion at 6:41 a.m., but aquarium personnel had controlled the leak before they arrived.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
The National Aquarium will expand its sustainable seafood efforts with a new endowed program, it announced on Monday. The National Aquarium Sustainable Seafood Program will include enhanced education programs for consumers about sustainable seafood options and will work to expand those options by creating new partnerships between local fishermen and local restaurants, according to the aquarium. Start-up funding for the new program was provided by a gift from the Dana DiCarlo and Scott Plank Family Foundation and their urban development company, War Horse.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
Melvin Ray Harris, a longtime employee of the United States Information Agency whose love of the outdoors led to stints with the National Park Service and as a volunteer at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore and the National Aquarium, died May 24 at the University of Maryland Medical Center of complications from a stroke. He was 83. A native of Youngstown, Ohio, Mr. Harris moved with his family to Washington, D.C., when he was very young. Save for occasional periods, many while overseas working for the State Department and the USIA, he remained in Washington until moving to South Baltimore in 1990.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 27, 2014
Here are some words that appeared in this column in November 1990: "The National Aquarium and its promoters are out to lunch. They don't have a clue. Their facility is better called the National Anachronism. The new Marine Mammal Pavilion, featuring captured dolphins in a huge tank of water, does not belong to the times in which we are living. It belongs to the times from which we just emerged. It belongs to the age of P.T. Barnum. " That was my protest of the National Aquarium's $35 million investment in a big dolphin tank with an amphitheater so dolphins with cute names could perform up to six daily shows.
NEWS
May 26, 2014
We applaud the National Aquarium in Baltimore for considering closing its dolphin exhibition and moving its eight dolphins to a seaside sanctuary to live out the rest of their lives ( "National Aquarium asks for feedback on dolphins, future plans," May 17). Over the past several decades we have learned that dolphins can swim up to a hundred miles a day and live in family-based pods. Prioritizing the quality of life of these complex creatures is forward-looking and in line with the National Aquarium's focus on conservation.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
When she was a girl, Jackie Burson said, she fell under the spell of dolphins while watching them on TV. She visited aquariums and theme parks to see them perform incredible tricks. "I used to love dolphin shows, too," she hollered through a bullhorn at the Inner Harbor on Saturday. "They're fun. The dolphins like it. Everybody wins, right? Wrong! Keeping [dolphins] in captivity is exactly the same as keeping them in prison. " Burson, of Waldorf, was one of about 50 people who gathered near the National Aquarium to hold up signs, hand out leaflets and protest the attraction's continued ownership of eight bottlenose dolphins - and to urge the aquarium's management to release them to live in an oceanside sanctuary.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
Asked to comment on the National Aquarium's ongoing debate about the proper treatment of its dolphins, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake said that "its success is one of many elements Baltimore has that supports my goal of growing the city by 10,000 families, because to grow a city you have to attract new residents and give those already here more reasons to stay" ( "National Aquarium's dolphin question at center of animal welfare debate," May 18)....
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | November 23, 1994
National Aquarium officials have never seen it happen. But it did. A shark gnawed its way through a collapsible canvas stretcher.And seven people were holding it.Fortunately, no one was hurt, not even the shark."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2001
Has it really been 20 years since opening day at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, and the line to the ticket office stretched four blocks to Light Street? More than 8,000 visitors toured the newest attraction to the Inner Harbor that day, admiring about 5,000 animals. Since Aug. 8, 1981, the aquatic collection has nearly tripled in size and scope, and more than 29 million visitors from all over the world have walked through the aquarium's doors. What a difference two decades make. On Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2001, the aquarium will celebrate 20 years of community support and success with an elaborate birthday bash -- and you're invited.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
If dolphins depart the National Aquarium, officials are contemplating what to do with the 1.2 million-gallon pool where the marine mammals have been on display for more than two decades. Among the possibilities: creating an underwater forest with swaying kelp seaweed stalks, leopard sharks and wolf eels, or a habitat that emulates the southern Pacific Ocean, where groupers and other marine life inhabit rusting fighter airplanes and other war wreckage. The fate of the $35 million Marine Mammal Pavilion, which opened in 1990 and takes up one-third of the aquarium's footprint, is one of many deliberations the National Aquarium has undertaken.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
The big question facing Baltimore's National Aquarium - whether to keep Atlantic bottlenose dolphins in the amphitheater pool or release them to an ocean-side sanctuary - is the latest twist in the decades-long evolution of American zoos and aquatic attractions from circus-like menageries to portals into the natural environment. Much of the change is driven by emerging scientific evidence that shows the advanced intellect of marine mammals compared with species such as sharks and puffins.
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