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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun Reporter | January 2, 2008
CASTLE HAVEN-- -- Down a one-lane road past barren fields teeming with squawking Canada geese is something that hasn't been found on the Eastern Shore for more than two decades - a river filled with oysters. And Kevin McClarren knows how many are there, because he and his crew have planted every single one. Five million healthy oysters on 3,000 floats on the water's surface, with anywhere from 1,000 to 10,000 oysters each. Every day, McClarren and his four workers - all of whom have degrees in biology or marine science - wade into the water, each with multiple layers of sweat shirts, to tend to their burgeoning crop.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | April 5, 2007
A bill designed to outlaw the trapping of Maryland's diamondback terrapin, which is threatened by a growing market in China, could be weakened by an exemption tentatively approved yesterday. The state Senate voted 27-19 to amend the proposed ban to allow the continued trapping and possession of the turtles for aquaculture. Supporters said the change was designed to protect a Preston waterman who has started breeding thousands of the turtles in tanks behind his home for sale to Asia for turtle soup.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | January 31, 2007
If state officials want to restore the Chesapeake Bay's once-thriving oyster population, they need to provide more funds for producing oysters, building reefs, encouraging aquaculture and preventing poaching from oyster sanctuaries, environmental experts said yesterday. Representatives from the University of Maryland, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and the Oyster Recovery Partnership laid out several ways to bring back the bay's moribund oyster population at a hearing yesterday before the House of Delegates Environmental Matters Committee.
NEWS
By John Balbus and Eliseo Guallar | November 28, 2006
WASHINGTON -- This month, a pivotal article published in Science magazine warned of the risk of depleting the world's seafood supply if current fishing practices remain unchanged. The article came on the heels of a long-awaited report from the Institute of Medicine calling attention to the health benefits of seafood and arguing that Americans should eat seafood for its abundance of lean protein and heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. How can we ensure these human health benefits with seafood stocks facing such a vulnerable future?
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | October 31, 2006
An Eastern Shore judge has rejected a property owner's claim that the state should not have leased land on the bottom of Chincoteague Bay to a fledgling aquaculture business that has been raising clams in the bed. David and Jena Harvey, Pennsylvania residents who own property in Girdletree, had argued that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources had no right to let Steve and Christy Gordon use the public bottom to grow clams. Worcester County Circuit Judge Theodore R. Eschenburg Sr. threw out the claim, though he agreed with the Harveys' contention that the state surveyed the property incorrectly and that the Gordons would have to give up the bed - at least until DNR can resurvey it. DNR officials said they believe Gordon can keep the clams on the bed for 90 days while a survey is done.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | September 24, 2006
GIRDLETREE -- Under the briny waters of this rural Worcester County hamlet, Maryland's fledgling aquaculture industry is getting its sea legs. Here, along the sandy bottom of Chincoteague Bay just south of Ocean City, Steve and Christy Gordon have planted millions of clams on beds leased from the state. The couple hope to take a piece of an industry that, in neighboring Virginia, produced close to $30 million for clam farmers during the past year alone. The Gordons' plan to eventually grow and sell enough clams to become a significant supplier to East Coast businesses might seem like a pipe dream in a place where the waters are known more for rampant pollution and shellfish diseases.
NEWS
By MARY ELLEN SLAYTER and MARY ELLEN SLAYTER,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 2005
CAMBRIDGE -- Andrew Lazur had no trouble finding Nemo. Helping the lovable little clown- fish grow in captivity was a bit harder. Lazur, an associate professor at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, has been perfecting techniques for growing Amphiprion ocellaris - Nemo's scientific name - more easily in a hatchery, reducing the need to raid fragile coral reefs to stock aquariums with the fish, which is prized for its coloring and...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2003
RIDGE - Some folks are ready to write off the Chesapeake Bay's once-fabled oyster, but not Richard Pelz. At his Circle C Oyster Ranch on a postcard-pretty cove in St. Mary's County, the stout, bearded one-time farmer from Ohio has tens of thousands of the bay's beleaguered shellfish corralled in white floating rafts tethered to his dock. A hand-lettered sign offers them for $6 a dozen. Fighting through a thicket of regulatory red tape, Pelz says, he has figured out how to beat the diseases that have nearly wiped out the bay's wild oysters, revive Maryland's moribund oyster industry and clean up the bay in the process - if only the government will let him. "If they turned us loose, I think we could clean up the bay in 10 years," he asserts.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | March 20, 2002
Candy colors In yet another move toward globalization, the makers of M&M's candies are asking citizens from 75 countries to vote on a matter of utmost importance - a new M&M's color. Candidates in the running are pink, violet and aqua. One will be selected in June to join six existing colors. Fans can vote by logging on to gcv.mms.com or calling 877-MM-GLOBE before May 31. Mad for mussels You'll find no shortage of ideas on how to prepare mussels, thanks to a new Web site from the Great Eastern Mussel Farms, the largest mussel aquaculture grower in the United States.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 17, 2000
ELKTON - A Cecil County family whose venture into fish farming failed when thousands of the fish died has filed a lawsuit charging its lender and the former chairman of the state's Aquaculture Advisory Committee with fraud. Scott and Donna McCardell, whose dispute with state aquaculture officials was described last year in The Sun, claim in their lawsuit that Aberdeen fish farmer Douglas C. Burdette Jr., the former chairman of the state's aquaculture advisory panel, sold them a defective system of tanks and filters.
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