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NEWS
July 23, 2010
Instead of trying to cultivate seafood indoors, University of Maryland scientists should work to teach people that sea animals are fascinating beings who feel pain just as much as cows, pigs, chickens, and other animals do ("Fish farming research at UM about to get real-world tryout," July 20). Fish farms are notoriously inhumane, and they pollute the environment with fish feces, antibiotic-laden fish feed, and fish carcasses. Fish on fish farms must be fed about five pounds of wild-caught fish to produce one pound of farmed-fish flesh.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
— Oysters may or may not be an aphrodisiac, but they sure bring out passion in those who raise them for a living. Tim Devine barely knew from oysters when he was growing up in Easton, not far from the Chesapeake Bay. Now he's growing them on 10 acres of bay bottom near here that he's leased from the state, and professing to love the hard work and challenges involved in cultivating and selling his prized bivalves. "It just seemed like the stars aligned," Devine, 37, said of his transition from commercial photographer in New York City to yeoman oyster farmer.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
As fish farming grows to feed a world hungry for protein, there's a hitch - the seas are being scoured of the little wild fish to feed the big captive ones destined for the dinner table. Researchers in Baltimore think they may have hit upon a remedy, one that moves aquaculture closer to truly being sustainable. Working at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology, a branch of the University System of Maryland, scientists have developed a plant-based fish food that even finny meat eaters like striped bass gobble up. The fish raised on such a nearly vegetarian diet also are healthier to eat, they say, with fewer of the worrisome chemical contaminants that show up in wild or even many farm-raised fish.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
As fish farming grows to feed a world hungry for protein, there's a hitch - the seas are being scoured of the little wild fish to feed the big captive ones destined for the dinner table. Researchers in Baltimore think they may have hit upon a remedy, one that moves aquaculture closer to truly being sustainable. Working at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology, a branch of the University System of Maryland, scientists have developed a plant-based fish food that even finny meat eaters like striped bass gobble up. The fish raised on such a nearly vegetarian diet also are healthier to eat, they say, with fewer of the worrisome chemical contaminants that show up in wild or even many farm-raised fish.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | October 31, 2006
An Eastern Shore judge has rejected a property owner's claim that the state should not have leased land on the bottom of Chincoteague Bay to a fledgling aquaculture business that has been raising clams in the bed. David and Jena Harvey, Pennsylvania residents who own property in Girdletree, had argued that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources had no right to let Steve and Christy Gordon use the public bottom to grow clams. Worcester County Circuit Judge Theodore R. Eschenburg Sr. threw out the claim, though he agreed with the Harveys' contention that the state surveyed the property incorrectly and that the Gordons would have to give up the bed - at least until DNR can resurvey it. DNR officials said they believe Gordon can keep the clams on the bed for 90 days while a survey is done.
NEWS
By Jean-Michel Cousteau | February 15, 1994
WITH human population growth showing no signs of slowing, many people -- ordinary citizens as well as decision makers -- have begun to wonder how we shall feed the future.One response that always seems to generate enthusiasm is fish farming, or aquaculture.On the surface, it is easy to see why this age-old industry might offer practical cures to current dilemmas. With world fisheries exploited at unsustainable levels, and world protein demand on the rise, aquaculture holds the promise of feeding vast numbers of people with relatively small inputs of energy and capital.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | November 8, 1990
In Thursday's Evening Sun, it was reported that a contractor received all of the $3 million the state spends on its oyster promulgation program. Actually, the contractor gets only part of the money.Dawn breaks over the inky surface of the Chester River as George O'Donnell readies his oyster boat for the day's harvest.He positions his vessel alongside about 20 others that bob above an oyster bar. As the sun climbs over the horizon, the watermen go to work.Some lower long tongs into the shallows and scoop the oysters from the bottom.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 17, 2000
ELKTON - A Cecil County family whose venture into fish farming failed when thousands of the fish died has filed a lawsuit charging its lender and the former chairman of the state's Aquaculture Advisory Committee with fraud. Scott and Donna McCardell, whose dispute with state aquaculture officials was described last year in The Sun, claim in their lawsuit that Aberdeen fish farmer Douglas C. Burdette Jr., the former chairman of the state's aquaculture advisory panel, sold them a defective system of tanks and filters.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | April 5, 2007
A bill designed to outlaw the trapping of Maryland's diamondback terrapin, which is threatened by a growing market in China, could be weakened by an exemption tentatively approved yesterday. The state Senate voted 27-19 to amend the proposed ban to allow the continued trapping and possession of the turtles for aquaculture. Supporters said the change was designed to protect a Preston waterman who has started breeding thousands of the turtles in tanks behind his home for sale to Asia for turtle soup.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 4, 2009
To praise from environmentalists and complaints from watermen, Gov. Martin O'Malley outlined plans Thursday to restore the Chesapeake Bay's depleted oysters by prohibiting commercial harvests in large portions of the bay while leasing other areas for aquaculture. Declaring that Maryland's long-standing approach to managing the bay's oysters no longer makes sense, O'Malley called for a major expansion of the current patchwork of sanctuaries, where oysters may not be removed. And he offered to help watermen move into aquaculture.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler | December 5, 2011
Maryland's fledgling oyster aquaculture industry gets a little national exposure this week, as the Cooking Channel pays a call on the Choptank Oyster Co. near Cambridge. In this week's episode of " Pitchin' In " a new series that appears to be the Cooking Channel's version of "Dirty Jobs ," Chef Lynn Crawford learns the hard way that "farming oysters is a filthy, dirty job," according to the online show blurb . The Choptank Oyster Co ., also known as Marinetics Inc., is arguably one of the most established of the state's oyster farms.  It's been raising millions of oysters in floats since 1996.  Its "Choptank Sweets" and "Choptank Salts" are sold and served on both sides of the Chesapeake Bay. The episode airs at 2:30 a.m. and 10:30 p.m. EST Thursday, Dec. 8, then again at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 10.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2011
Long-awaited "streamlining" of the tangled state and federal red tape Maryland watermen must navigate for permission to establish oyster farming operations finally took effect Monday. Now, instead of seeking approvals from three separate state agencies and then the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, watermen can file a single, joint state-federal application with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. While the Corps still must issue a separate approval, it has agreed to a simplified "Regional General Permit" that federal officials say should shorten the process.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
In his recent article about oyster farming ("State's oyster farmers snagged on red tape," June 20), Tim Wheeler left out several important facts regarding the issuance of aquaculture leases. Had they been included, perhaps the headline of the article might have been, "Despite necessary start-up and transition delays, oyster farming off to a good start. " Lease issuance is a two-part process between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the state of Maryland. While the state may be able to promptly approve an application, few applicants have the time or money to generate multiple maps and perform complex geographical reviews as required by the Corps.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
— The dock built to hold water-filled tanks of baby oysters stands empty. The new marina for landing fully grown bivalves is being used for now by some crabbers. Encouraged by a new state policy to boost private oyster farming, Jay Robinson and Ryan Bergey applied last fall to lease upward of 1,000 acres in Fishing Bay in southern Dorchester County. They planned to "plant" 100 million hatchery-spawned oysters on the bottom there this year and raise them for sale to restaurants and seafood wholesalers.
NEWS
By Carrie Madren | May 16, 2011
For nearly a century, oysters have been pummeled from two sides: us and nature. Our appetite for oysters has spurred overharvesting; at the same time, pollution has made oysters more vulnerable to disease, and sediment has smothered oyster beds. Conservationists, lawmakers and natural resource experts have been scratching their heads for nearly as long, trying to figure out how to save Crassostrea virginica populations. Now, solutions that give us hope are coming from us — and nature.
NEWS
July 23, 2010
Instead of trying to cultivate seafood indoors, University of Maryland scientists should work to teach people that sea animals are fascinating beings who feel pain just as much as cows, pigs, chickens, and other animals do ("Fish farming research at UM about to get real-world tryout," July 20). Fish farms are notoriously inhumane, and they pollute the environment with fish feces, antibiotic-laden fish feed, and fish carcasses. Fish on fish farms must be fed about five pounds of wild-caught fish to produce one pound of farmed-fish flesh.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1999
Scott and Donna McCardell saw a chance to get in on an industry of the future.In rural Cecil County, where farming often means cattle or corn, the husband-and-wife team set out to raise fish. And when they joined forces with a longtime leader in the business -- the chairman of the state's advisory panel on aquaculture, no less -- they confidently bet virtually everything they owned on the venture."It wasn't going to make us rich," said Donna McCardell, "but it was going to be a nice, comfortable living."
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
A technique developed by University of Maryland scientists for cultivating seafood indoors is slated to get its first real-world tryout under a licensing agreement with a newly formed Baltimore company. The technique, in which fish destined for the dinner table are bred in captivity and raised in large tanks of artificial sea water, has been licensed to a biotechnology startup called Maryland Sustainable Mariculture, University System of Maryland officials say. It's a watershed for Yonathan Zohar and his team of scientists and technicians, who've been working for years to perfect their "recirculating marine aquaculture system" in the Columbus Center at the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 25, 2010
The third paragraph in most newspaper stories about efforts to restore the Chesapeake Bay by restricting some human activity — the harvesting of crabs, the spreading of chicken manure on farmland, the development of more suburban housing — contains the predictable "warning" about the consequences of the action. The most recent example of this could be seen on the front page of The Baltimore Sun on Saturday: "The head of the Maryland Oystermen Association warned that the state's move threatens the livelihood of the few hundred watermen still actively harvesting oysters because it would bar them from working many of the most productive shellfish bars or reefs left in the bay."
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