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ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
Callowhill pool's aqua-aerobics class sounds a lot like a nightclub. Dance music with a heavy beat blares from a mediocre sound system and reverberates through the room. Women, and a few men, groove to the music. "One, two, three, four ... turn it," shouts instructor and facility director Richard Gray. But the "dancers" are submerged in almost 4 feet of water. They jog in place, they pump their arms in the air. However, their heads - many covered with shower caps and swim caps - stay dry. The workout isn't always set to a nightclub soundtrack.
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BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Aqua Sphere CEO Don Rockwell says he had no idea that Michael Phelps , the most decorated Olympic athlete of all time, would come out of retirement when the swimming equipment manufacturer sought earlier this year to partner with him. Talk about added value. "We would have been happy to have him" even if Phelps had not created a massive buzz in the sport by returning to competitive swimming, Rockwell said Tuesday. Phelps will compete in the U.S. Swimming Championships beginning Wednesday in Irvine, Calif.
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NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2002
In the lobby of Columbia's Wilde Lake Middle School, guests are greeted with a colorful fish tank. Blue tangs, small rays and even a little shark are lovely to see, but the tank is not just for display. It is one of 20 aquariums in the building that have schoolchildren checking water pH and algae growth - part of Aqua Havens for Education. "Aqua students" learn to care for marine life and habitats, eventually conducting research that puts them in touch with professional scientists. Aqua Havens' pupil director is Amber Madore, 13, an eighth-grader.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
A new restaurant named Preserve will open later this spring on Main Street in Annapolis. The location is the old Aqua Terra space, which closed in April 2012. The owners of Preserve are a married couple, Michelle and Jeremy Hoffman, who have recently relocated to Annapolis from Alexandria, Va. This is the first restaurant for the couple, who met as students at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. Jeremy Hoffman left his chef de cuisine job at Alexandria's highly regarded Restaurant Eve, where he worked for the seven-time James Beard Foundation award-nominee Cathal Armstrong.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1996
A mini-castle, its rusting turrets rising from a dingy facade, is the last great remnant of Aqua-Land Park.The 400-acre gambling palace and amusement park on the Potomac River is barely recognizable these days -- at least not as the all-night entertainment hub that pulsed and profited at the southern tip of Charles County more than 30 years ago.Instead, the land and the strip of U.S. 301 that leads into it through Charles County have become awkward reminders...
NEWS
July 31, 1996
FireHampstead: Firefighters from Hampstead responded for an investigation at Aqua View Drive and Gross Mill Road at 10: 38 a.m. Monday. Units were out for 30 minutes.Pub Date: 7/31/96
NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 23, 2000
Tall ships are sure great, but tall buildings stay longer. What ever became of every U.S. citizen's constitutional right to cheap gasoline! Water has been discovered on Mars but that's a long way to go for bottled aqua. All crimes are illegal already. Hate crimes are hateful already. So Prince William turned 18. Don't get excited. It happens to everyone.
NEWS
By Jennifer Mendelsohn and Jennifer Mendelsohn,Special to the Sun | June 22, 2003
Stop by the pool at the Jewish Community Center in Pikesville during instructor Malkie Raskas' popular Aqua-Tread class, and the first sounds you might hear are the thumping strains of dance music from a poolside stereo. But listen more closely, and you'll hear other noises echoing against the white-tiled walls: grunts, huffs, puffs and the like -- the undeniable evidence of the exertion of the 20-odd participants in the class as they work to keep up with one of the most progressive workouts in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2002
Bad weather is bad enough. But bad weather that comes as a surprise costs money, makes people angry and embarrasses forecasters. The same is true for predicted storms that veer away after everyone has boarded up their windows and fled to higher ground. Soon, with help from a $70 million set of infrared detectors designed by a physicist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, a new satellite may give meteorologists a way to reduce the frequency of these costly forecast "busts."
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | September 27, 2007
I am sorry, Evian and San Pellegrino and Dasani and all the other bottled waters out there - Aqua Velva, Wells Fargo, Muddy Waters, Joan Rivers, Jerry Springer, whatever - but the current campaign against paying good money for bottled water when tap water is perfectly good is so sensible on the face of it that I am now done with you. Fini. No more designer water. Water is water. If you want lemon flavoring, add a slice of lemon. You want bubbles, stick a straw in it and blow. My father, a true conservative, would have smiled on this.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2011
Dust off that old pashmina, we're going to Aqua Terra. Aqua Terra, when it opened in 2000, was something of an anomaly in Annapolis. Especially on quaint Main Street, it felt like a darker and bluesier take on the open-kitchen restaurant that was showing up everywhere. Today's Aqua Terra combines elements like the curving glass-block entrance wall, a fedora-clad kitchen staff and softly playing jazz to evoke another era — the 1920s maybe, or the 1810s … it's hard to tell — but most people would guess, within a year or two, that Aqua Terra opened in 2000.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | September 27, 2007
I am sorry, Evian and San Pellegrino and Dasani and all the other bottled waters out there - Aqua Velva, Wells Fargo, Muddy Waters, Joan Rivers, Jerry Springer, whatever - but the current campaign against paying good money for bottled water when tap water is perfectly good is so sensible on the face of it that I am now done with you. Fini. No more designer water. Water is water. If you want lemon flavoring, add a slice of lemon. You want bubbles, stick a straw in it and blow. My father, a true conservative, would have smiled on this.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2005
Sherry Westerman peeked out of her apartment window one Saturday night this summer to see searchlights streaking the skies over Canton. Probably a tony new restaurant had opened, or some dignitary was hitting the town, but, to be sure, the financial analyst asked her boyfriend what the hoopla was about. "It's the pool," he said. As in the chlorine-irrigated concrete pit behind their gym, where water aerobicizers thrash, where the pinnacle of fashion is a pearlescent bathing cap? Yep. Much to gym members' surprise, the swimming pool at the Merritt Athletic Club in Canton is masquerading this summer as the Aqua Lounge, a new party spot that purports to be the 180,000-gallon watering hole of Baltimore's beautiful people.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 28, 2005
I've heard about a new trend called water yoga. Can you tell me more about it? I hurt myself doing regular yoga. We posed this question to Dana Pomfrey, member services manager and former aquatic director at the Merritt Athletic Club in Towson. The club offers a class called Yoga H2O, a water-based class consisting mainly of standing poses, Pomfrey says. Water yoga, or aqua yoga, is building a following because it is so gentle on the body. Performed in water at waist to shoulder depth, the added buoyancy helps you move smoothly and avoid injury.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
Callowhill pool's aqua-aerobics class sounds a lot like a nightclub. Dance music with a heavy beat blares from a mediocre sound system and reverberates through the room. Women, and a few men, groove to the music. "One, two, three, four ... turn it," shouts instructor and facility director Richard Gray. But the "dancers" are submerged in almost 4 feet of water. They jog in place, they pump their arms in the air. However, their heads - many covered with shower caps and swim caps - stay dry. The workout isn't always set to a nightclub soundtrack.
NEWS
By Jennifer Mendelsohn and Jennifer Mendelsohn,Special to the Sun | June 22, 2003
Stop by the pool at the Jewish Community Center in Pikesville during instructor Malkie Raskas' popular Aqua-Tread class, and the first sounds you might hear are the thumping strains of dance music from a poolside stereo. But listen more closely, and you'll hear other noises echoing against the white-tiled walls: grunts, huffs, puffs and the like -- the undeniable evidence of the exertion of the 20-odd participants in the class as they work to keep up with one of the most progressive workouts in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 28, 2005
I've heard about a new trend called water yoga. Can you tell me more about it? I hurt myself doing regular yoga. We posed this question to Dana Pomfrey, member services manager and former aquatic director at the Merritt Athletic Club in Towson. The club offers a class called Yoga H2O, a water-based class consisting mainly of standing poses, Pomfrey says. Water yoga, or aqua yoga, is building a following because it is so gentle on the body. Performed in water at waist to shoulder depth, the added buoyancy helps you move smoothly and avoid injury.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | February 6, 2000
The Fells Point Creative Alliance is one of those unsung, under-funded groups that continually makes the improbable possible. A bunch of amateur but energetic swimmers -- of both genders and all body types -- want to put on a water ballet at the Patterson Park Pool? The FPCA will make sure it happens. In fact it did happen last summer. If you were unfortunate enough to miss "Water Shorts," which was performed by the community arts group Fluid Movement before a sold-out audience, you won't want to miss the movie.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2002
In the lobby of Columbia's Wilde Lake Middle School, guests are greeted with a colorful fish tank. Blue tangs, small rays and even a little shark are lovely to see, but the tank is not just for display. It is one of 20 aquariums in the building that has schoolchildren checking water pH and algae growth - part of Aqua Havens for Education. "Aqua students" learn to care for marine life and habitats, eventually conducting research that puts them in touch with professional scientists. Aqua Havens' pupil director is Amber Madore, 13, an eighth-grader.
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