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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 27, 1990
PHILADELPHIA -- The Scholastic Aptitude Test, the college-entrance exam millions of teen-agers take each year, may be significantly changed for the first time in 50 years.Trustees of the College Board, which administers the national test, were to meet in New York today and tomorrow to consider restructuring the exam, in a move to make it harder to coach students for the test and to make the exam more attuned to schoolwork.Although the specific proposals are secret, some board members disclosed that they include introducing more essay-type questions, allowing students to use calculators and adding mathematics problems without multiple-choice answers.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | March 2, 2008
The high-decibel chatter that occasionally typified the start of my 12th-grade English class was suddenly silenced. "I want this noise to stop!" our teacher roared, accentuating her words by slapping her palm on the desk. As we sat stunned, wondering what had we done to derail her normally genteel disposition, she lashed out again: Our daily horseplay, she insisted, indicated how we rarely took classwork seriously. And that, she said, was why we and other South Carolina students were making headlines for performing poorly on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)
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NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | August 30, 1992
Scholastic Aptitude Test scores in Howard County changed little from last year, school officials said. The average scores on the verbal portion of the test dropped to 455 from 458 the year before. Math scores rose to 521 from 517.This year's combined score rose one point to 976. Last year, Howard County school officials reported a 12-point jump in combined scores for county seniors."The fact that we held is not just an aberration," spokeswoman Patti Caplan said. "Our students are holding that score."
NEWS
By TOM BOWMAN and TOM BOWMAN,SUN REPORTER | December 16, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Army met its recruiting goal for November by again accepting a high percentage of recruits who scored in the lowest category on the military's aptitude tests, Pentagon officials said yesterday, raising renewed concerns that the quality of the all-volunteer force will suffer. The Army exceeded by 256 its goal of 5,600 recruits for November, while the Army Reserve brought in 1,454 recruits, exceeding its target by 112. To do so, the Army accepted a "double-digit" percentage of recruits who scored between 16 and 30 out of a possible 99 on the military's aptitude test, said officials who requested anonymity.
NEWS
By Anthony DePalma and Anthony DePalma,New York Times News Service | January 22, 1991
Already under pressure from parents, peers and a society that often sees test scores as measures of success, increasing numbers of students as young as age 12 are taking the difficult, three-hour college entrance examination before entering high school.Last year, 105,700 seventh- and eighth-graders took the Scholastic Aptitude Test, a multiple-choice examination intended for high school juniors and seniors.The number of young test-takers has been growing for the last 20 years; that age group now makes up 6 percent of the 1.7 million students who take the exam each year.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 1, 1990
BOSTON -- The Scholastic Aptitude Test will undergo a major overhaul by 1994, with more emphasis on reading and less on multiple-choice questions, College Board officials announced FTC yesterday.However, a controversial proposal to require a written essay as a standard part of the college admission examination was dropped.Instead, bowing to California educators and Asian-Americans worried about the effect on immigrants, a written essay will replace the multiple-choice English composition achievement test, which is merely supplemental to the regular SAT and is required by far fewer colleges.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Although studies show girls get better grades in high school and college than boys, only about 35 percent of National Merit Scholarship winners are girls, according to a new report that raises questions about the fairness of the nation's most prestigious scholarship program.According to FairTest, an organization striving to keep bias out standardized tests, more than 60 percent of semifinalists in the 1993 competition are boys. In none of the 50 states were more girls than boys selected.
NEWS
June 14, 1993
Robert Sutton, 16, of Gambrills.School: Arundel Senior High.Accomplishments, Interests:Robert recently scored a perfect 800 on the math section of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), better known as college boards.According to the College Board Admission Testing Program offices in New Jersey, only 1 percent of all students nationwide who take the SAT receive a perfect score on the math section.In addition to his regular math instruction at Arundel High, Robert received tutoring from the Sylvan Learning Center SAT preparatory program.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | April 15, 1994
Put your money where your mind is.Coaching classes for standardized education tests have become big business. The goals are qualifying for everything from college entrance to graduate school to professional licensing.This year, with a brand-new Scholastic Assessment Test (the former SAT now has the word "aptitude" removed) for college entrance, there's a 50 percent increase nationwide in coaching-class enrollment at firms such as Kaplan Educational Centers and the Princeton Review. Hundreds of smaller operations also offer coaching.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | August 3, 1992
Three years ago, a shudder went through the hearts of female students and their tuition-paying parents when research by a women's advocacy group concluded that the Educational Testing Service's Scholastic Aptitude Test, or SAT, is biased against girls and women.Each year, more than 1.7 million students who want to go to college, many of them seeking scholarships, plunk down $17 to take the test. Fifty-two percent are female.A riveting study of SAT scores for verbal and mathematical skills in 1989 by Phyllis F. Rosser, director of the Equality and Testing Project in Holmdel, N.J., showed that the gap between SAT scores of females and males was 57 points, with girls averaging 878 points out of a possible 1,600 and boys averaging 935."
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2005
In 2003, Harford school system officials noticed that SAT scores for county students had been stagnant over a span of several years. Hoping to spur improvement on the SAT Reasoning Test - a standard college entrance exam formerly known as the Scholastic Aptitude Test - county schools began offering preparation courses that consist of online and classroom instruction. Although school officials say it's too early to judge the effectiveness of the program, test scores have risen, the prep courses are filling up and more students are taking the SAT. "You need at least a couple of years to look at the numbers to be able to attribute an increase to anything," said Gerald Scarborough, assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction for county schools.
NEWS
By James L. Fisher | July 16, 2002
THE PEAK SAT time will be coming up shortly and the anxiety level of students and their parents is already rising. When will we really take a hard look at the College Board's entrance examination? Should the SAT be changed or de-emphasized or completely dropped as an admission requirement? Passion abounds on both sides -- from diehards who continue to maintain that it is the great equalizer to egalitarians who shout unfair discrimination. Lately, the issue has been further dramatized for me because over the past two years, three of my nine grandchildren have taken the SAT. They scored well and they are honor students.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 23, 2002
The College Board is planning to revamp the main SAT test taken by generations of college-bound students, acknowledging in part that it is doing so in response to criticism from the University of California and others that the test does not reflect enough of what is learned in the classroom. The exact nature of the changes, which would take effect with the high school class graduating in 2006, will not be determined until the College Board trustees next meet in June. But the College Board trustees took the first step this week by asking the staff for recommendations on revising the three-hour verbal and math test.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2000
Baltimore-based Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. said yesterday that it has agreed to sell its Sylvan Prometric computer-testing division to Thomson Corp. of Canada for about $775 million. Sylvan also again warned that its profit for the 1999 fourth quarter would come in below analysts' estimates, though it said it will be a few weeks before it provides details of the shortfall. Analysts had expected the company to earn 48 cents a share in the quarter. Sylvan shares closed higher yesterday at $15.25, up $1.1875 per share.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and By Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | October 24, 1999
"The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy," by Nicholas Lemann. Farrar, Strauss and Giroux. 368 pages. $27.Nicholas Lemann started out thinking he would probably write a history of the Educational Testing Service, the organization that markets the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) to prospective university students. Somehow, he persuaded the management at the secretive organization to open its archives to him. What he found turned out to be fascinating.But alert readers will note that the title of Lemann's new book says nothing specifically about the Educational Testing Service, and fails to mention the SAT by name.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
Howard County third-graders continued to improve their mastery of basic skills, but fifth- and eighth-graders slipped slightly on last spring's Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills.The results of the most recent set of nationally standardized exams indicate that the statewide shift toward more instruction in problem-solving is not coming at the expense of lessons in basic skills for Howard students, school officials say.Howard students have shown "remarkable consistency and made a lot of improvement, too," said Leslie Walker-Bartnick, the school system's supervisor of testing.
NEWS
By James L. Fisher | July 16, 2002
THE PEAK SAT time will be coming up shortly and the anxiety level of students and their parents is already rising. When will we really take a hard look at the College Board's entrance examination? Should the SAT be changed or de-emphasized or completely dropped as an admission requirement? Passion abounds on both sides -- from diehards who continue to maintain that it is the great equalizer to egalitarians who shout unfair discrimination. Lately, the issue has been further dramatized for me because over the past two years, three of my nine grandchildren have taken the SAT. They scored well and they are honor students.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1995
Maybe that explains the world inside the Capital Beltway.After sifting data from a study of gifted seventh-graders, a Johns Hopkins University psychologist found that boys fascinated by politics tended to have lower achievement and aptitude test scores than those who placed little value on command, control and dominance.Meanwhile, boys who enjoyed solving puzzles tended to earn higher scores on achievement tests than those with little interest in such "theoretical" pursuits.Dr. Julian C. Stanley, director of Hopkins' Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth, said he was surprised by his findings, calling the results "very striking."
NEWS
By MICHAEL HOLDEN | June 7, 1996
CHESTERTOWN -- Another school year ends, and we are one year closer to the year 2000, by which time, we are told, 70 percent of all third-, fifth-, and eighth-graders in Maryland public schools reach a ''satisfactory'' score as measured by the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program test.What does ''satisfactory'' mean? No one really knows. The State Department of Education has defined the word as, ''A realistic and rigorous level of achievement indicating [the schools'] proficiency in meeting the needs of the students.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | June 3, 1995
Freshman Baltimore County Councilman Kevin Kamenetz sat on a tiny chair for 80 minutes yesterday in the stifling media center at Fort Garrison Elementary School, eating humble pie.Facing 13 angry, but polite parents led by Principal Lois H. Balcer, the embarrassed young politician, whose district includes Pikesville and Randallstown, learned a painful political lesson:When you get 50 letters written by second-graders from one of zTC your home district's most...
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